Complete List of all Calibers of Ammo Ever Made

Rimfire cartridges

.17 Hornady Mach 2 (.17HM2)

The .17 Hornady Mach 2, or .17 HM2, is a rimfire cartridge introduced in 2004 by the ammunition manufacturer Hornady, following the successful launch in 2002 of the .17 HMR. The .17 HM2 is based on the .22 Long Rifle “Stinger” case, necked down to .17 caliber (4.5 mm) and using a bullet weighing less than half what typical .22 Long Rifle bullets weigh.

.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire (.17HMR)

.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire (4.5×27mmR), commonly known as the .17 HMR, is a rimfire rifle cartridge developed by the ammunition company Hornady in 2002. It descended from the .22 Magnum by necking down the .22 Magnum case to take a .17 caliber (4.5 mm) projectile. Commonly loaded with a 17 grain (1.1 g) projectile, it can deliver muzzle velocities in excess of 775 m/s (2550 ft/s).

.17 Winchester Super Magnum

 

.17 Winchester Super Magnum, is a rimfire rifle cartridge developed by the ammunition company Winchester in 2012. It descended from the .27 caliber nail gun blank by necking down the blank case to take a .17 caliber (4.5 mm) bullet. Initial loadings were with a 20 grain bullet, delivering muzzle velocities around 3000 ft/s .

.22 BB Cap

.22 BB Cap (Bulleted Breech Cap) is a variety of .22 caliber rimfire ammunition. .22 BB cap and .22 CB refer to cartridges that are low velocity and project reduced noise.

.22 Extra Long

Introduced around 1880, the .22 Extra Long was used in Remington, Ballard, Wesson, Stevens, and later (1916) models of Winchester’s M1902 and M1904 single-shot bolt-action rifles, as well as in Smith & Wesson revolvers. e .22 Extra Long is a .22 in (5.6 mm) American rimfire rifle and handgun cartridge.

.22 Long

.22 Long is a variety of .22 caliber (5.6 mm) rimfire ammunition. The .22 Long is the second-oldest of the surviving rimfire cartridges, dating back to 1871, when it was loaded with a 29 grain (1.9 g) bullet and 5 grains (0.32 g) of black powder, 25% more than the .22 Short it was based on. It was designed for use in revolvers, but was soon chambered in rifles as well, in which it gained a strong reputation as a small game cartridge, and sold very well

.22 Long Rifle

The .22 Long Rifle (metric designation: 5.6×15mmR) cartridge is a long-established variety of .22 caliber rimfire ammunition, and in terms of units sold is still by far the most common ammunition in the world today.The cartridge is often referred to simply as .22 LR (“twenty-two-/ˈɛl/-/ˈɑːr/”) and various rifles, pistols, revolvers, submachine guns and even some smoothbore shotguns (No. 1 bore) have been manufactured in this caliber.
.22 Short

.22 Short is a variety of .22 caliber (5.6 mm) rimfire ammunition. Developed in 1857 for the first Smith & Wesson revolver, the .22 rimfire was the first American metallic cartridge.[1] The original loading was a 29 or 30 gr (0.066 or 0.069 oz; 1.879 or 1.944 g) bullet and 4 gr (0.0091 oz; 0.2592 g) of black powder. The original .22 rimfire cartridge was renamed .22 Short with the introduction of the .22 Long in 1871.[1]

Developed for self defense, the modern .22 Short, though still used in a few pocket pistols and mini-revolvers, is mainly used as a quiet round for practice by the recreational shooter. The .22 Short was popularly used in shooting galleries at fairs and arcades; several rifle makers produced “gallery” models for .22 Short exclusively. Due to its low recoil and good inherent accuracy, the .22 Short was used for the Olympic 25 meter rapid fire pistol event until 2004, and they were allowed in the shooting part of modern pentathlon competitions before they switched to air pistols.[1]

Several makes of starter pistols use .22 Short blank cartridges. Some powder-actuated nail guns use the .22 Short cartridge as a power source.

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire (.22 WMR)

The .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire (5.6×27mmR), more commonly called .22 WMR, .22 Magnum, or simply .22 Mag, is a rimfire cartridge. Originally loaded with a bullet weight of 40 grains (2.6 g) delivering velocities in the 2,000 feet per second (610 m/s) range from a rifle barrel, .22 WMR has also been loaded with bullet weights of 50 grains (3.2 g) at 1,750 feet per second (530 m/s) and 30 grains (1.9 g) at 2,250 feet per second (690 m/s). More recently, a high-quality 30gr Vmax cartridge from Hornady has been released. This exceeds 2200fps in a rifle and has a reputation for much greater consistency and accuracy than was previously attributed to this calibre. Accuracy around 1 MOA is achievable and this has led to this cartridge regaining ground previously lost to the excellent .17 HMR, especially as the 30gr bullet weight (nearly double that of the HMR’s normal 17gr) gives it a reputation for hitting harder on larger varmints such as fox and coyote.

.22 Winchester Rimfire (.22 WRF)

The .22 Winchester Rimfire (commonly called the .22 WRF) is an American rimfire rifle cartridge.

Introduced in the Winchester M1890 slide rifle, it had a flat-nose slug, and is identical to the .22 Remington Special (which differed only in having a roundnosed slug).[1] It uses a flat-based, inside-lubricated bullet, which differs from the outside-lube slug of the .22 Short, Long, LR, and Extra Long rounds.[1]

When introduced, the .22 WRF “was the first notable improvement in the killing power” over the .22 LR,[2] and was able to kill cleaner at up to 75 yd (70 m). It is somewhat less accurate than the .22 LR[1] and is most suited to hunting small game such as rabbits or prairie dogs.[2]

Shortly before World War II, propellants were developed that greatly increased the effectiveness of the .22 LR. These new “High Velocity” loadings offered a nearly 300fps increase in velocity over the original 1050fps .22 LR load.[citation needed] This increase in power of the smaller round, coupled with its cheaper price and sheer number of rifles already owned in .22 LR, effectively killed the .22 WRF.[citation needed]

A variety of Winchester, Remington, and Stevens single-shot and repeater rifles were offered from 1890 onward, but new rifles are not made for this cartridge. .22 WRF ammunition is periodically offered by commercial makers for use in the old guns.[1] It can be fired in any rifle chambered for the more powerful .22 WMR.[1] The shorter WRF cartridge may be limited to single shot use in WMR rifles, since it may not feed from WMR-length magazines, depending on design.

.25 Stevens

The .25 Stevens was an American rimfire rifle cartridge.[1]Developed by J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company and Peters Cartridge Company,[1] it was developed between 1898 and 1900; catalogs suggest it was introduced in 1898, but most sources agree on 1900.[1] It was offered in the Crack Shot #15 rifle, which debuted in 1900.[1] It may also have been available in the Favorite rifle, which was first released in 1894.[2] It originally used a 10 to 11 gr (0.65 to 0.71 g) black powder charge under a 67 gr (4.3 g) slug; this was later replaced by smokeless.With “an excellent reputation”[1] as a small game (such as rabbit) and varmint round, it suffered excessively high trajectory (a drop of 5.1 in (130 mm) at 100 yd (91 m))[3] compared to the .22 Long Rifle.[1] It was available with either solid lead or hollow point bullet.[1]Serving as the parent for the less-successful .25 Stevens Short and experimental Remington .267 Rimfire, it was dropped in 1942.[1]

.32 Rimfire (.32 Short and .32 Long)

The term .32 rimfire refers to a family of cartridges which were chambered in revolvers and rifles in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. These rounds were made primarily in short and long lengths, but extra short, long rifle and extra long lengths were offered.[1]

5 mm Remington Rimfire Magnum

The 5mm Remington Rimfire Magnum or 5mm RRM[3] is a bottlenecked rimfire cartridge introduced by Remington Arms Company in 1969. Remington chambered it in a pair of bolt-action rifles, the Model 591 and Model 592, but the round never became very popular, and the rifles were discontinued in 1974.[4] About 52,000 rifles and 30,000 barrels for the T/C Contender pistol were sold during its brief production run. Remington discontinued the cartridge itself in 1982,[4] leaving owners with no source of ammunition.[5][6]

In 2008, the cartridge was reintroduced by Mexico’s Aguila Ammunition in collaboration with Centurion Ordnance.[7][8][9]

Standard Centerfire Cartridges

Smaller than .30 caliber

.17 Hornet

 

The .17 Hornet is a .17 caliber centerfire rifle cartridge originally offered as a “wildcat cartridge” made by P.O. Ackley in the early 1950s. He created this non-factory (wildcat) offering by simply necking-down the .22 Hornet to .17 caliber and fire-forming the resized cases in his new chamber design. The result was a small quiet cartridge capable of high velocity. Ackley mentions it as one of the most balanced of the .17 cartridges of his time; likely, this is still true.[1]

Sixty years later, Hornady Manufacturing Company (Grand Island, Nebraska, USA) has taken Ackley’s idea into a commercial product with a similar cartridge; the 17 Hornady Hornet uses a 20 grain (1.3 gram) “Superformance” V-max projectile at a published velocity of 3650fps (1113 metre/second). [2]

However, the new standardized ammunition/brass is not built to exactly the same dimensional specifications as the original wildcat or the dimensions listed on this page. Hornady’s standard has a shorter body with less taper and shorter overall case length while the overall loaded length remains that of the original .22 Hornet (in order to fit the standard Hornet Magazines). Shooters wishing to use the .17 Hornady Hornet in a .17 Ackley Hornet chamber will experience the bullet jumping to the rifling and may lose some of the inherent accuracy for which the cartridge has been known.

It has been reported the .17 Hornady Hornet uses a thicker rim than the original Hornet case. However, the 9th Edition of the Hornady “Handbook of Cartridge Reloading” shows them to be the same (.065 inches); measuring the rims of actual factory cases shows the Hornady Handbook to be correct. Moreover, Ackley’s “Pocket Manual for Shooters and Reloaders” shows the rim thickness for his wildcat to range between .069″ and .063″ which is consistent with the Hornady Handbook. Both cartridges head-space on this rim.

While the Ackley cartridge uses a 30-degree shoulder angle and the Hornady is 25 degrees, its longer shoulder is accommodated by Ackley’s longer case body. Fireforming will move the Hornady’s shoulder forward at the expense of neck length.

Yet there is a final size issue: according to Ackley’s Manual, his wildcat cartridge is only .289″ over the shoulder while the Hornady factory round measures .294″. This is the reason the Hornady’s case capacity is almost identical to that of the Ackley. Since there is five thousands less taper in the case body, the new .17 Hornady Hornet cases may not fit an Ackley chamber without full-length resizing.

Existing rifles chambered for the Ackley wildcat can have their barrels set back one turn and rechambered to the new .17 Hornady Hornet which meets the SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) standard for the .17 Hornet. This would fix the bullet jump issue and improve ammunition availability with little risk of diminished performance.

.17 Remington

 

The .17 Remington was introduced in 1971 by Remington Arms Company for their model 700 rifles.

It is based on the .222 Remington Magnum case necked down to .172 in (4.37 mm), with the shoulder moved back.[3][4] It was designed exclusively as a varmint round, though it is suitable for smaller predators. There are those such as P.O. Ackley who used it on much larger game, but such use is not typical.

Extremely high initial velocity (over 4000 ft/s 1200 m/s), flat trajectory and very low recoil are the .17 Remington’s primary attributes. It has a maximum effective range of about 440 yards (400 m) on prairie dog-sized animals, but the small bullet’s poor ballistic coefficients and sectional densities mean it is highly susceptible to crosswinds at such distances.

The smaller .172 bullet typically has a much lower ballistic coefficient than other typical varmint calibers, such as that of the .223 Remington. Because of this, the .172 bullet loses velocity slightly sooner and is more sensitive to wind; but by no means does this render the cartridge useless. The advantages of this cartridge are low recoil, flat trajectory, and minimal entrance wounds. The tiny entrance wound and usual lack of exit wound on coyote-sized animals make it an ideal round for fur bearing animals from which the hunter intends to collect a pelt. A significant disadvantage is the rapid rate at which such a small-caliber rifle barrel can accumulate gilding metal fouling, which is very detrimental to accuracy and may also eventually result in increasing pressures caused by the fouling’s constriction of the bore.[5][6] Many .17 Remington shooters have reported optimum accuracy when the bore is cleaned after every 10 – 20 shots,[5][6][7] though more modern metallurgy used in both barrels and bullets has largely mitigated the fouling issue.

The .17 Remington is also one of the few cartridges in which powder charge weight is often greater than bullet weight. Though this condition has been known to degrade accuracy, the .17 Remington is noted for exceptional accuracy.[6] This reputation for accuracy is due in no small part to the fact that only good quality bolt action and single shot rifles have been so chambered from the factory. Although the cartridge is based on the .223, it cannot be used in the AR-15 and Ruger Mini-14 without feeding and magazine issues,

 

.17 Remington Fireball

The .17 Remington Fireball was created in 2007 by Remington Arms Company as a response to the popular wildcat round, the .17 Mach IV. Factory loads drive a 20 grain (1.3 g) bullet around 4,000 ft/s (1,219 m/s). Velocity is close to the .17 Remington but with significantly less powder, and therefore less heat and fouling. Both are important issues to high-volume shooters such as varmint hunters.

 

It is based on the .221 Remington Fireball necked down to accept a .17 caliber bullet and is very similar to the .17 Mach IV. Reports on this cartridge show mild recoil, high velocity, with minimal report (noise).[2]

.22 Accelerator

The .22 Accelerator is a special loading of the .30-30, .308, and .30-06 cartridges that is manufactured by Remington.[1] It consists of a sub-caliber 0.224-inch (5.7 mm) diameter bullet held in a .30-caliber 7-grain (0.45 g) six-fingered plastic sabot with a hollowed base. The bullet separates from the sabot approximately 14 inches (360 mm) from the muzzle. The cartridge allows for using a large-caliber rifle for varmint shooting, although the accuracy is somewhat diminished.[1] The advantage, however, is the extremely high muzzle velocity from factory-loaded ammunition (see the info box).
.22 Hornet

 

 

The .22 Hornet or 5.6×35mmR[2] is a varmint, small-game, predator, and competition centerfire rifle cartridge commercially introduced in 1930. It is considerably more powerful than the .22 WMR and the .17 HMR, achieving higher velocity with a bullet twice the weight. The Hornet also differs very significantly from these in that it is not a rimfire but a centerfire cartridge. This makes it handloadable and reloadable, and thus much more versatile. It was the smallest commercially available .22 caliber centerfire cartridge until the introduction of the FN 5.7×28mm.

 

The .22 Hornet fills the gap between such popular varmint/predator cartridges as the .22 WMR and the .223 Remington. In regard to muzzle velocity, muzzle energy and noise, it is well suited to vermin and predator control in relatively built-up areas.

.22 CHeetah

 

The .22 CHeetah (both C and H are upper-case,[1] referring to Carmichel / Huntington[2]) is a .22 wildcat cartridge developed in the 1970s or 1980s by Jim Carmichel and Fred Huntington.[3]

 

The .22 CHeetah is essentially a Remington 308 BR, modified to fit the 22 caliber,[4] and is the most popular wildcat; two custom gunmakers, Shilen Rifle Company and Wichita Engineering, are now making rifles specifically for the cartridge.[5] The cartridge’s 50-grain .22-caliber bullets have a muzzle speed upward of 4,300 ft/s (4,250 according to some[6]), and the cartridge is known for its long-range accuracy and velocity.[2] Its high intensity is notoriously hard on barrels, which require constant cleaning.[6][7]

.204 Ruger

 

The .204 Ruger is a centerfire rifle cartridge developed by Hornady and Ruger. At the time of its introduction in 2004, the .204 Ruger was the second highest velocity commercially produced ammunition and the only centerfire cartridge produced commercially for bullets of .204 inch/5 mm caliber.
.218 Bee

 

 

The .218 Bee is a .22 caliber centerfire rifle cartridge designed for varmint hunting by Winchester in 1937. The cartridge was originally chambered in the Winchester Model 65 lever-action rifles, which may have ultimately led to its lack of popularity. The cartridge is named for the bore diameter of the barrel in which the cartridge is chambered rather than the usual practice in the United States of having the cartridge’s nomenclature reflect in some way the bullet diameter.

.219 Zipper

 

 

The .219 Zipper cartridge was created by Winchester Repeating Arms in 1937 to be used in their lever-action Model 64 rifle. It is a 30-30 Winchester cartridge necked down to a .22 caliber bullet. Marlin Firearms also offered their Marlin Model 336 rifle (Marlin 336 Zipper) chambered for the cartridge.

 

While the .219 Zipper was supposed to compete against other varmint cartridges of the time, most lever-action rifles use tubular magazines, which prohibit the use of pointed bullets. This led to problems with accuracy. Winchester stopped producing .219 Zipper ammunition in 1962, Remington Arms stopped production of the cartridge soon afterwards. The .219 Zipper is the parent case of the .219 Donaldson Wasp, and P.O. Ackley created the .219 Zipper Improved in 1937. Leslie Lindahl’s Chucker and Super-chucker and “wildcat” case modifications by Hervey Lovell, Lysle Kilbourne, and W. F. Vickery offered similarly superior ballistics in stronger single-shot and bolt actions.[1]

 

Though the flat- or round-nosed slug causes rapid loss of velocity, the .219 Zipper is suitable for small game or varmints, including wolf or coyote, and even deer if loaded with a heavier 55 grain bullet.[2] It works well in guns designed to fire rimmed ammunition, such as rebarreled Lee–Enfields, but not in Mauser-type actions, which are not.[2]

.220 Russian

 

The .220 Russian (5.6×39mm) cartridge was developed in the late 1950s for deer hunting in Russia. It is a 7.62×39mm cartridge necked down to hold a 5.6 mm bullet. It was later adopted by Finland, and by around 1965 was being produced by SAKO and Lapua. When it was introduced to the United States, Sako, and later Lapua, brass was stamped “.220 Russian”.

 

The .220 Russian is the parent case for the .22 PPC, 6mm PPC, and the 6.5mm Grendel cartridge.
.220 Swift

 

The .220 Swift (5.56×56mmSR) is a semi-rimmed rifle cartridge developed by Winchester and introduced in 1935 for small game and varmint hunting. It was the first factory loaded rifle cartridge with a muzzle velocity of over 4,000 ft/s (1,200 m/s).[3]

.221 Remington Fireball

 

The .221 Remington Fireball is a centerfire cartridge created by Remington Arms Company in 1963 as a special round for use in their experimental single-shot bolt-action pistol, the XP-100.[2] A shortened version of the .222 Remington, it is popular as a varmint and small predator round while also finding use among target shooters. It has application as both a pistol round and as a rifle round.
.22-250 Remington
The .22-250 Remington is a very high-velocity (capable of reaching over 4000 feet per second), short action, .22 caliber rifle cartridge primarily used for varmint hunting and small game hunting, though it finds occasional use on deer.[2] This cartridge is also sometimes known as the .22 Varminter or the .22 Wotkyns Original Swift.[3] Along with the .220 Swift, the .22-250 was one of the high-velocity .22 caliber cartridges that developed a reputation for remote wounding effects known as hydrostatic shock in the late 1930s and early 1940s.[4][5]

.222 Remington

 

The .222 Remington, which is also known as the Triple Deuce/Triple Two/Treble Two is a centerfire rifle cartridge. Introduced in 1950, it was the first commercial rimless .22 (5.56 mm) cartridge made in the United States. As such, it was an entirely new design, without a parent case.[2] The .222 Remington was a popular target cartridge from its introduction until the mid-1970s and still enjoys a reputation for inherent accuracy. It remains a popular vermin or “varmint” cartridge at short and medium ranges with preferred bullet weights of 40-55 grains and muzzle velocities from 3000-3500 fps.

.222 Remington Magnum

 

The .222 Remington Magnum was a short-lived commercially produced cartridge derived from the .222 Remington. Originally developed for a US military prototype Armalite AR-15 rifle in 1958, the cartridge was not adopted by the military, but was introduced commercially in sporting rifles.

.223 Remington

 

 

The .223 Remington (.223 Rem) is a rifle cartridge. The name is commonly pronounced either two-twenty-three or two-two-three Remington. It is commercially loaded with 0.224 inch (5.56 mm) diameter jacketed bullets, with weights ranging from 40 to 85 grains (2.6 to 5.8 g), though the most common loading by far is 55 grains (3.6 g). A 90 gr Sierra Matchking bullet is available for reloaders. [3] The .223 Rem was first offered to the civilian sporting market in December 1963 in the Remington 760 rifle. [4] In 1964 the .223 Rem cartridge was adopted for use in the Colt M16 rifle which became an alternate standard rifle of the U.S. Army. The military version of the cartridge uses a 55 gr full metal jacket boattail design and was designated M193. In 1980 NATO modified the .223 Remington into a new design which is designated 5.56×45mm NATO type SS109. [5]

.223 Winchester Super Short Magnum

 

The .223 WSSM (Winchester Super Short Magnum, 5.56×42mm) is a .224 caliber rifle cartridge created by Winchester and Browning based on a shortened version of the Winchester Short Magnum case.

.224 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .224 Weatherby Magnum (5.56×49mmB) is a sporting cartridge that was developed in 1963 by Roy Weatherby after about 10 years of development.[2] It is a proprietary cartridge with no major firearms manufacturers chambering rifles for it other than Weatherby. It was originally called the .224 Weatherby Varmintmaster when it was introduced alongside the Weatherby Varmintmaster rifle, but the rifle was discontinued in 1994 and the cartridge was renamed.

.225 Winchester

 

The .225 Winchester cartridge was introduced in 1964 by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company.

 

Based on the .219 Zipper case but with a reduced rim diameter[2] to fit the common .473″ bolt face, it was intended as a replacement for the .220 Swift cartridge which had a reputation for burning out barrels. Despite having a modern straight taper design, the round was eclipsed by the older .22-250 Remington, already a popular wildcat introduced commercially a year later.

 

The .225 Winchester was chambered in factory rifles by Winchester (Models 70 and 670) and Savage (Model 340). All commercially produced rifles chambered in .225 Winchester were turn-bolt actions. Winchester ceased producing rifles chambered in .225 Winchester in 1971, however seasonal production of loaded ammunition and brass continues by Winchester. Reloading dies for the round are readily available.

 

The .225 Winchester’s case is a parent case for some of SSK Industries'[3] popular line of JDJ cartridges designed by J.D. Jones, chosen for its strength and semi-rimmed design which makes it well suited for use in break-open actions.[4]

.240 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .240 Weatherby Magnum was developed in 1968 by Roy Weatherby. In the development of his own .240in/6 mm cartridge, Weatherby was significantly influenced by both the success and the limitations of the .244 H&H Magnum cartridge devised in England by his friend and colleague David Lloyd. It was the last cartridge to be designed by Roy Weatherby.[2]

.243 Winchester

 

The .243 Winchester (6×52mm) is a popular sporting rifle cartridge. Initially designed as a target/varmint round, it may be used for animals such as coyote, blacktail deer, whitetail deer, mule deer, pronghorn, and wild hogs. It can also be used against larger animals such as black bear or elk but is sometimes said to be “too light” for such large animals. Rounds of at least 90 grains are better suited for hunting larger animals while rounds less than 90 grains are more suitable for varmints.[3] The .243 is based on a necked down .308 cartridge case. It is very popular with target shooters, Metallic Silhouette, and long range shooters, because of its accuracy and low recoil.

.243 Winchester Super Short Magnum

 

 

The 243 Winchester Super Short Magnum or 243 WSSM is a rifle cartridge introduced in 2003. It uses a .300 WSM (Winchester Short Magnum) case shortened and necked down to accept a .243in/6mm diameter bullet, and is a high velocity round based on ballistics design philosophies that are intended to produce a high level of efficiency.[2] The correct name for the cartridge, as listed by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI), is 243 WSSM, without a decimal point.[3] Winchester has discontinued the manufacture of 243 WSSM ammunition. As of the first half of 2016, Winchester/Olin did manufactured and release for sale some WSSM ammunition. The product is only manufactured periodically, often on inconsistent intervals.

.244 H&H Magnum

 

The .244 Holland & Holland Magnum cartridge was created in 1955 in Great Britain by deerstalker and rifle-maker David Lloyd of Pipewell Hall, Northamptonshire and Glencassley in Sutherland, Scotland, and is not to be confused with the smaller-cased and much milder 6 mm (.244 in) Remington. Stalking on extremely steep deer forests such as his own at Glencassley, Lloyd was in search of a “canyon rifle” cartridge that would shoot exceptionally fast and with a very flat trajectory across deep valleys and over distances out to 300 yards (270 m) and more, to make range estimation less critical for accurate bullet placement, and to deliver a hard-hitting bullet weighing a minimum of 100 grains. The .244 H&H Magnum easily met these criteria.
.244 Remington

 

 

The 6mm Remington rifle cartridge, originally introduced in 1955 by Remington Arms Company as the .244 Remington, is based on a necked down .257 Roberts cartridge using a .24/6mm bullet. Known for a combination of high velocity, long range, and accuracy, it is suitable as a dual use hunting cartridge for both varmints and medium-sized big game. When used in the less common earlier slow twist barrels, it offers exceptional range for varmint applications. While not as commercially popular today as it’s close cousin and competitor, the .243 Winchester, the 6mm Remington enjoys a slightly ballistic advantage and continues to be popular with handloaders and custom rifle builders.

.25 Winchester Super Short Magnum

 

The .25 Winchester Super Short Magnum is a third member of the Winchester Super Short Magnum (WSSM) cartridge family created by Winchester and Browning. It is the largest caliber of the WSSM’s and is the most capable of handling large game such as deer and wild boar.

 

.25-06 Remington

 

The .25-06 Remington had been a wildcat cartridge for half a century before being standardized by Remington in 1969. It is based on the .30-06 Springfield cartridge necked-down (case opening made narrower) to .257 caliber with no other changes. Nominal bullet diameter is 0.257 inches (6.53 mm) and bullet weights range from 75 to 120 grains (4.9 to 7.8 g).

.25-20 Winchester

 

The .25-20 Winchester, or WCF (Winchester center fire) was developed around 1895 for the Winchester Model 1892 lever action rifle. It was based on necking down the .32-20 Winchester. In the early 20th century, it was a popular small game and varmint round, developing around 1,460 ft/s with 86-grain bullets.

 

While the SAAMI pressure rating is a full 28,000 CUP, modern ammunition is often loaded lighter in deference to the weaker steels used on many of the original guns. The early black powder cartridges were loaded to about 20,000 psi, but the SAAMI rating is close to that of the high velocity smokeless rounds produced later. The high velocity loadings developed 1,732 ft/s.[2]

 

It was easy and economical to reload, and was once a favorite with farmers, ranchers, pot hunters and trappers. Though the .25-20 has been used on deer and even claimed the James Jordan Buck, a whitetail deer of long standing record in 1914,[3] it is now rarely used on large-bodied game due to its sedate ballistics and light bullet construction, which make humane one-shot kills unlikely.

 

The 25-20 Winchester should not be confused with the similarly named .25-20 Single Shot; the two cartridges are markedly different and will not interchange with one another.

.25-35 Winchester

 

The .25-35 Winchester, or WCF (Winchester Center Fire) was introduced in 1895 by Winchester for the Winchester Model 1894 lever action rifle. The case was based on the .30-30 cartridge.

.250-3000 Savage

 

The .250-3000 Savage is a rifle cartridge created by Charles Newton in 1915 and is also known as the .250 Savage. The name comes from its original manufacturer, Savage Arms and the fact that the original load achieved a 3000 ft/s (910 m/s) velocity with an 87 grain (5.6 g) bullet.[2]
.257 Roberts

 

The .257 Roberts also known as .257 Bob [2] is a medium-powered .25 caliber cartridge. It has been described as the best compromise between the low recoil and flat trajectory of smaller calibers such as the .22 and 6mm, and the strong energy but not the strong recoil of larger popular hunting calibers, such as the 7mm family and the popular .30-06.[3]

.257 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .257 Weatherby Magnum is a .257 Caliber (6.35 mm) belted bottlenecked cartridge. It is one of the original standard length magnums developed by shortening the .375 H&H Magnum case to approx. 2.5 in (64 mm). Of the cartridges developed by Roy Weatherby, the .257 Weatherby Magnum was known to have been his favorite, and the cartridge currently ranks third in Weatherby cartridge sales, after the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum and the .300 Weatherby Magnum.[2]

 

The .257 Weatherby Magnum is among one of the flattest shooting commercial cartridges. It is capable of firing a 115 gr (7.5 g) Nosler Ballistic Tip bullet at 3,400 ft/s (1,036 m/s) generating 2,952 ft·lbf (4,002 J) of energy[3] which is comparable to factory loadings of the .30-06 Springfield and the .35 Whelen in terms of energy.

 

Discrepancies between the metric and U.S. diameters of the bullet may cause some confusion. A .257 bullet has a metric bullet diameter of 6.53 mm. However, in Europe cartridge designation nomenclature for a large part relies on the bore diameter. As the bore diameter of the rifle is .250 inches this would make the .257 Weatherby Magnum a 6.35 mm caliber cartridge rather than a 6.5mm caliber cartridge.

.260 Remington

 

 

The .260 Remington (also known as 6.5-08 A-Square) cartridge was introduced by Remington in 1997. Many wildcat cartridges based on the .308 Winchester case had existed for years before Remington standardized this round. Although loaded to higher pressures, the ballistics of this cartridge are basically similar to the 6.5×55mm when bullet weights do not exceed 140 grains. When loaded with heavier bullets, the 6.5×55mm is capable of greater velocity.[1] Due to its shorter overall length the .260 Remington can be chambered in a shorter length action than the 6.5×55mm.

 

Because 6.5 mm (.264″) bullets have relatively high ballistic coefficients, the .260 Remington has seen success in rifle competition including bench rest, metallic silhouette, and long range. It is capable of duplicating the trajectory of the .300 Winchester Magnum, while generating significantly lower recoil.[2] Also, converting a rifle chambered for the .308 Winchester (or any of its offspring, such as the .243 Winchester, 7mm-08 Remington, or .338 Federal) to .260 Remington generally requires little more than a simple barrel change.

 

 

.264 Winchester Magnum

 

The .264 Winchester Magnum is a belted, bottlenecked rifle cartridge. Apart from the .244 H&H Magnum and .257 Weatherby Magnum, it is the smallest caliber factory cartridge derived from the 2.85 in (72 mm) Holland & Holland belted magnum case. It was introduced in the late 1950s and early 1960s with the .338 Winchester Magnum and the .458 Winchester Magnum as one of a family of short-cased 2.5 in (64 mm) belted magnum cartridges developed by Winchester based on the .375 Holland & Holland parent case. It was officially introduced to the public by Winchester in 1959. After many years of dwindling use it began enjoying a mild resurgence in popularity in the mid-2000s among long range rifle enthusiasts and reloaders due to the high ballistic coefficient of the heavier 6.5mm bullets and increasing popularity of cartridges such as 6.5mm Creedmoor, .260 Remington, 6.5 Grendel, benchrest and wildcat cartridges in 6.5mm.

.270 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .270 Weatherby Magnum was the first belted magnum based on the .300 H&H Magnum to be developed by Roy Weatherby. It has the characteristic double-radius shoulders and is necked down to accommodate the .277in bullets. Like most Weatherby cartridges, the .270 Weatherby was standardized by the Small Arms and Ammunitions Manufacturers Institute in 1994, and it has a SAAMI maximum pressure limit of 62,500 psi. The first Weatherby cartridge to be used in Africa was the .270 Weatherby on a jackal on June 8, 1948.[2]

.270 Winchester

 

The .270 Winchester (or 6.8×64mm) was developed by Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1923 and unveiled in 1925 as a chambering for their bolt-action Model 54.[3] The cartridge is a necked down .30-03, which is the same length as the .280 Remington, both of which are longer than the .30-06 Springfield. The .270, .280, and .30-06 were all derived from the .30-03 parent case.

.270 Winchester Short Magnum

 

The 270 Winchester Short Magnum or 270 WSM is a short, unbelted, magnum cartridge created by necking down the .300 Winchester Short Magnum and fitting it with a .277 caliber bullet. The correct name for the cartridge, as listed by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI), is 270 WSM, without a decimal point.[3]

.280 Ross

 

The .280 Ross, also known as the .280 Nitro, .280 Rimless Nitro Express Ross (CIP) and .280 Rimless cartridge, is an approximately 7mm bullet diameter rifle round developed in Canada by F.W. Jones as a consultant to Sir Charles Ross, 9th Baronet, and his Ross Rifle Company of Quebec, Canada for use as a Canadian military cartridge as a replacement for the .303 British, and in a civilianised and sporterised version of his controversial Mark II and Mk III Ross rifle, and first commercially produced by Eley Brothers of London, England, in late 1907.[1]

.280 Remington

 

The .280 Remington, also known as the 7mm-06 Remington and 7mm Express Remington, was introduced in 1957 for the Remington model 740, 760, 721, and 725 rifles.

.284 Winchester

 

The .284 Winchester is an example of a commercially unsuccessful cartridge that has enjoyed a resurgence due to interest from long-range competitive shooters.[2] Introduced by Winchester in 1963, the .284 Winchester was designed to squeeze .270 Winchester and .280 Remington performance from the new Winchester Model 100 autoloader and Winchester Model 88 lever action rifles.

 

The end result was a 7 mm cartridge with about the same overall length as the .308 Winchester but with a wider body that yields a powder capacity about the same as that of the .270 Winchester and .280 Remington.[3]

.30 caliber – .40 caliber

.30 Carbine

 

The .30 Carbine (7.62×33mm) is the cartridge used in the M1 Carbine introduced in the 1940s. It is a light rifle round[2][3][4][5] designed to be fired from the M1 carbine’s 18-inch (458 mm) barrel.

.30 Newton

 

The .30 Newton cartridge was designed by Charles Newton for Fred Adolph, a gunsmith, in 1913, and was originally known as the .30 Adolf Express. The Newton Arms Company was the only manufacturer of commercial rifles chambered for this cartridge. It should not be confused with the .30 Belted Newton (a.k.a. .30-338), which is a different cartridge not designed by Charles Newton. Although suitable for any large North American game, it is an obsolete round no longer manufactured. Before World War II, loaded cartridges were once offered by Western Cartridge Company. Buffalo Arms currently sells unloaded brass.

.30 RAR

 

The .30 Remington AR cartridge was created in 2008 by Remington Arms to fill a perceived gap in performance on game between the .223 Remington and larger cartridges such as the .308 Winchester and the 6.8 SPC.[1] Design of the cartridge is considered a joint effort between companies under the “Freedom Group” name through a private equity firm [1] and included such companies as Bushmaster, DPMS and Remington itself. It is a rebated rim cartridge designed to fit Remington’s R-15 semiautomatic hunting rifle. It was designed to fit the dimensional constraints of the AR-15 magazine and is based on a modification of the .450 Bushmaster, which in turn was based on the .284 Winchester.[2]

.30-30 Winchester

 

The .30-30 Winchester/.30 Winchester Center Fire (7.8x51R) cartridge was first marketed in early 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever-action rifle.[2] The .30-30 (thirty-thirty), as it is most commonly known, was the USA’s first small-bore, sporting rifle cartridge designed for smokeless powder.

.30 Remington
The .30 Remington cartridge was created in 1906 by Remington Arms. It was Remington’s rimless answer to the popular .30-30 Winchester cartridge. Factory ammunition was produced until the late 1980s, but now it is a prospect for handloaders. Load data for the .30-30 Winchester can be used safely for the .30 Remington.

.30 Remington AR

 

The .30 Remington AR cartridge was created in 2008 by Remington Arms to fill a perceived gap in performance on game between the .223 Remington and larger cartridges such as the .308 Winchester and the 6.8 SPC.[1] Design of the cartridge is considered a joint effort between companies under the “Freedom Group” name through a private equity firm [1] and included such companies as Bushmaster, DPMS and Remington itself. It is a rebated rim cartridge designed to fit Remington’s R-15 semiautomatic hunting rifle. It was designed to fit the dimensional constraints of the AR-15 magazine and is based on a modification of the .450 Bushmaster, which in turn was based on the .284 Winchester.[2]

.30 TC

 

The .30 TC is a cartridge developed by Thompson Center Arms.[1] It was released for sale in 2007. It was initially offered in the Icon series of bolt-action rifles, which were released at the same time. It was an attempt by Thompson Center to make a 308 Winchester length round with 30-06 Springfield performance. While it did accomplish this goal, consumer acceptance was low, and the round has remained on the sidelines.[2] The 6.5mm Creedmoor cartridge was created by necking down the .30 TC and that cartridge has achieved widespread popularity.

.30-06 Springfield

 

The .30-06 Springfield cartridge (pronounced “thirty-aught-six” or “thirty-oh-six”), 7.62×63mm in metric notation and called “.30 Gov’t ’06” by Winchester,[3] was introduced to the United States Army in 1906 and later standardized; it remained in use until the early 1980s. The “.30” refers to the caliber of the bullet. The “06” refers to the year the cartridge was adopted—1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6mm Lee Navy, and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the U.S. Army’s primary rifle and machine gun cartridge for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62×51mm NATO (commercial .308 Winchester) and 5.56×45mm NATO, both of which remain in current U.S. and NATO service. It remains a very popular sporting round, with ammunition produced by all major manufacturers.

.30-30 Winchester (.30 WCF)

 

The .30-30 Winchester/.30 Winchester Center Fire (7.8x51R) cartridge was first marketed in early 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever-action rifle.[2] The .30-30 (thirty-thirty), as it is most commonly known, was the USA’s first small-bore, sporting rifle cartridge designed for smokeless powder.

.30-40 Krag (.30 Army)

 

The .30-40 Krag (also called .30 U.S., or .30 Army) was a cartridge developed in the early 1890s to provide the U.S. armed forces with a smokeless powder cartridge suited for use with modern small-bore repeating rifles to be selected in the 1892 small arm trials. Since the cartridge it was replacing was the .45-70 Government, the round was considered small-bore at the time. The design selected was ultimately the Krag–Jørgensen, formally adopted as the M1892 Springfield. It was also used in M1893 and later Gatling guns.

.30-378 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum is a .30 caliber (small bore), belted, bottle-necked rifle cartridge.[2] The cartridge was developed in response to a US Army military contract in 1959. While still unreleased to the public, the cartridge went on to set world records for accuracy including the first ten 10X in 1,000 yards (910 m) benchrest shooting.[3] It is currently the highest velocity .30 caliber factory ammunition available.

.300 H&H Magnum

 

The .300 H&H Magnum Cartridge was introduced by the British company Holland & Holland as the Super-Thirty in June, 1925.[1] The case was belted like the .375 H&H Magnum, and is based on the same case, as also is the .244 H&H Magnum. The belt is for headspace as the cases’ shoulders have a narrow slope rather than an actual shoulder. More modern magnums continue this practice, but headspacing on the belt is not necessary with their more sharply angled shoulders. The cartridge was used by American shooter Ben Comfort to win the 1000-yard Wimbledon Cup Match at Camp Perry in 1935,[1] and it was used again to win the international 1,000 yard competition in 1937.[2] Winchester chambered the Model 70 in .300 Holland & Holland Magnum in 1937.[1]

 

The cartridge offered superior ballistics to the .30-06 for long range, and the .300 H&H is almost as versatile with all bullet weights and types, especially if well-developed handloads are used. It excels with the heaviest .30-calibre bullets in the 180–220-grain range. SAAMI has set the pressure limit for this cartridge at 54,000 P.S.I.[2] Its case length calls for a full-length magnum action, and surplus military actions chambered for the .308 Norma Magnum or the .300 Winchester Magnum offered a lower cost alternative for similar ballistics in the 1960s.[3] The long .300 H&H case was designed for loading cordite, and those two modern magnum cartridges offered similar powder volume in a shorter case better adapted to ballistic uniformity with United States Improved Military Rifle (IMR) smokeless powder.[4]

 

It has never been as popular as the .30-06; but the mystique of well-crafted rifles chambered for the .300 H&H keeps the cartridge in use despite its repeatedly reported demise. The .300 H&H is a fine African plains game cartridge, and suitable for all but the most dangerous big game and pachyderms.

.300 AAC Blackout (7.62×35mm)

 

300 AAC Blackout, SAAMI short name 300 BLK, also known as 7.62×35mm is a rifle cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. Its purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacity. Care should be taken not to use 300 BLK ammunition in a rifle chambered for .223/5.56 or 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical.[1]

.300 Remington SA Ultra Mag

 

.300 Remington Short Action Ultra Magnum (also known as 300 RSAUM, 300 RSUM or 300 Rem SAUM) is a .30 caliber short magnum cartridge that is a shortened version of the Remington 300 Ultra Mag, both of which derive from the .404 Jeffery case. The Remington Short Ultra Mag was put on the market shortly after Winchester released its 300 WSM round in 2001, resulting in the Winchester product getting the marketing advantage that has eclipsed the Remington offering.[1]

 

 

 

.300 Remington Ultra Magnum

 

 

The .300 Remington Ultra Magnum, also known as the .300 Ultra Mag’ or .300 RUM is a 7.62 mm (.308in.) caliber rifle cartridge, 7.62×72mm, or .30 caliber rifle cartridge introduced by Remington Arms in 1999. The .300 Remington Ultra Magnum is one of the largest commercially available .30 caliber magnums currently being produced. It is a beltless, rebated rim cartridge, capable of handling all large North American game, as well as long-range shooting. Among commercially produced .30-caliber rifle chamberings, the .300 Remington Ultra Magnum is second only to the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum in cartridge-case capacity.

.300 Ruger Compact Magnum

 

 

The .300 Ruger Compact Magnum or .300 RCM is a rimless, short-length rifle cartridge designed for the hunting of Medium-to-Large-sized North American game. It is designed to closely duplicate the performance of the historic .300 Winchester Magnum cartridge, yet to be chambered in a short length action rifle. The cartridge was designed by Hornady and Ruger in partnership and released commercially in 2008 and chambered in various Ruger rifles.[1]

.300 Savage

 

The .300 Savage cartridge is a rimless, .30 caliber rifle cartridge developed by the Savage Arms Company in 1920. It was designed to replace the less powerful .303 Savage in their popular Savage Model 99 lever-action rifle.[3] Despite having a short case and a rather stumpy neck, the cartridge is capable of propelling a 150-grain (9.7 g) bullet at over 2,600 ft/s (790 m/s) with an effective range of over 300 yd (270 m).[4]

 

 

 

.300 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .300 Weatherby Magnum is a .30 caliber rifle cartridge created by Roy Weatherby in 1944 and produced by Weatherby. It has become the most popular of all the Weatherby cartridges.[1]

 

 

.300 Winchester Magnum

 

The .300 Winchester Magnum (also known as .300 Win Mag or 300WM) (7.62×67mm) is a belted, bottlenecked magnum rifle cartridge that was introduced by Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed to fit in a standard rifle action. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which has been blown out, shortened, and necked down to accept a .30 caliber (7.62 mm) bullet.[3]

 

The .300 Winchester is extremely versatile and has been adopted by a wide range of users including hunters, target shooters, military units, and law enforcement departments. Hunters found the cartridge to be an effective all-around choice with bullet options ranging from the flatter shooting 165 grain to the harder hitting 200+ grain selections available from the factory. The .300 Win Mag remains the most popular .30 caliber magnum with American hunters, despite being surpassed in performance by the more powerful .300 and .30-378 Weatherby Magnums and the newer .300 Remington Ultra Magnum.[4] It is a popular selection for hunting moose, elk, and bighorn sheep as it can deliver better long range performance with better bullet weight than most other .30 caliber cartridges. Military and law enforcement departments adopted the cartridge for long range sniping and marksmanship. As a testament to its accuracy, since its introduction it has gone on to win several 1,000-yard (910 m) competitions.[5]

.300 Winchester Short Magnum

 

.300 Winchester Short Magnum (also known as .300 WSM) is a .30 caliber rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire short magnum cartridge that was introduced in 2001 by Winchester.[1]

.303 British

 

The .303 British (designated as the 303 British by the C.I.P.[2] and SAAMI[3]) or 7.7×56mmR, is a .303-inch (7.7 mm) calibre (with the bore diameter measured between the lands as is common practice in Europe) rimmed rifle cartridge first developed in Britain as a black-powder round put into service in December 1888 for the Lee–Metford rifle. In 1891 the cartridge was adapted to use smokeless powder.[4] It was the standard British and Commonwealth military cartridge from 1889 until the 1950s when it was replaced by the 7.62×51mm NATO.[2]

.303 Savage

 

The .303 Savage is a rimmed, .30 caliber rifle cartridge developed by the Savage Arms Company in 1894 which was designed as a short action cartridge for their popular Savage Model 99 hammerless lever-action rifle. The cartridge was designed for smokeless powder at a time when black-powder cartridges were still popular. The .303 Savage round was ballistically superior to the .30-30 Winchester, but only marginally. The .303 Savage remained popular through the 1930s.[1]

.307 Winchester

 

The 307 Winchester cartridge was introduced by Winchester in 1982 to meet the demand of .300 Savage performance in a lever-action rifle equipped with a tubular magazine. It is nearly dimensionally identical to the more common .308 Winchester cartridge, the only differences being a rimmed base and thicker case walls.

 

The Winchester Big Bore Model 94 Angle Eject rifle was the only rifle produced to fire the cartridge, though competitor Marlin Firearms created some prototype model 336 rifles chambered in .307 Win. It is still commercially loaded today, but many handload to gain better performance and accuracy. Because of safety concerns owing to the rifle’s tubular magazine, flat-nosed bullets are normally used.

 

The .307 Winchester cartridge sees widespread use today, especially among sporting shooters in Spain, due to Spanish gun laws that prohibit civilian use of “military calibers” such as .308 Winchester-the civilian equivalent of the 7.62×51mm NATO cartridge.

.308 Marlin Express

 

The .308 Marlin Express is a cartridge developed in 2007 by Marlin Firearms and Hornady. It is based on the .307 Winchester with a goal to duplicate .308 Winchester performance. The cartridge uses a slightly shorter, semi-rimmed case similar to that of the .220 Swift to function in lever action rifles. As introduced in Hornady’s LEVERevolution line of cartridges, it is the highest velocity production cartridge designed for lever action rifles with tubular magazines. It is chambered in Marlin’s Model 308MX and 308MXLR rifles using the Marlin Model 336 action.[1]

.308 Norma Magnum

 

The .308 Norma Magnum (7.62×65mmBR) cartridge was created by Nils Kvale at Norma, Sweden. Like the larger .358 Norma Magnum it is based on the .300 H&H Magnum.[1] The length of the case is the longest that would fit in a standard Mauser action. While it appeared to have a bright future initially, it was soon superseded in popularity by the .300 Winchester Magnum. The first, and one of the few, manufacturers to offer rifles in .308 Norma Magnum was Schultz & Larsen of Denmark and they still are.

 

In the late 1940s Kvale designed a wildcat called 8mm Kvale. It was intended for use in the German surplus 8mm Mauser M98 that flooded the American market after the war and was therefore nicknamed ‘Poor Man’s Magnum’. Kvale used the case from the .300 H&H Magnum and reduced the rim diameter so it would fit the bolt of a Mauser M98. The lessons learned from this cartridge were put into the .308 and .358 Norma Magnum.

 

Cases for the cartridge can be purchased from Norma or made in three ways: Necking up a 7 mm Remington Magnum case, necking down a .338 Winchester Magnum case, or running .300 Winchester Magnum cases through a full-length sizing die. Since the first two options leave the brass a bit short, the third is generally considered to be the best option. Ammunition for this caliber is not cheap (typically US$50–60 for 20 cartridges) and as such it is mainly of interest only to handloaders who own a rifle chambered in this caliber. The cartridge makes use of a belted case for headspacing.

 

It’s short powder column give it an edge in efficiency over most of the older.30 cal magnums, not including ultra magnums or wsm caliber. the longer neck helps with seating longer/heavier projectiles better than the shorter necked 300 win mag. The shorter neck means that the projectile in certain rifles has to go deeper into the case whereby taking up more powder space.

 

The demise of the Norma magnum case can be summed up as a marketing failure on Normas part. Although rifles were available in this caliber only brass for reloading was available in large quantities, with Norma the only manufacturer of ready made ammo. Winchester however was able to produce the popular model 70 rifles in their caliber and mass-produced ready made ammo to the American public. This was the main reason of the 300 Winchester magnums popularity over the 308 norma mag. The 308 norma magnum is considered by many reloaders as a better caliber compared to the 300 winchester magnum that essentially replaced it.

.308 Winchester

 

The .308 Winchester (pronounced: “three-oh-eight”) is a rimless, bottlenecked rifle cartridge and is the commercial cartridge from which the 7.62×51mm NATO round was derived. The .308 Winchester was introduced in 1952, two years prior to the NATO adoption of the 7.62×51mm NATO T65. Winchester branded the cartridge and introduced it to the commercial hunting market as the .308 Winchester. Winchester’s Model 70 and Model 88 rifles were subsequently chambered for the new cartridge. Since then, the .308 Winchester has become the most popular short-action, big-game hunting cartridge worldwide.[2] It is also commonly used for civilian hunting, target shooting, Metallic Silhouette, bench rest target shooting, palma, metal matches and military sniping, and police sharpshooting. The relatively short case makes the .308 Winchester especially well-adapted for short-action rifles. When loaded with a bullet that expands, tumbles, or fragments in tissue, this cartridge is capable of high terminal performance.[3][4][5]

 

Although very similar to the military 7.62×51mm NATO specifications, the .308 cartridge is not identical, and there are special considerations that may apply when mixing these cartridges with 7.62×51mm NATO, and .308 Winchester chambered arms.[6] Their interchange is, however, considered safe by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI).[7]

.32 Remington

 

The .32 Remington (also known as the .32 Remington Auto-Loading or .32 Remington Rimless) is an American rifle cartridge. A rimless, smokeless powder design, this cartridge was once considered to be suitable for game larger than deer and black bear.[1] Similar contemporary cartridges include the rimmed .32 Winchester Special, a cartridge introduced by Winchester and offered as a chambering in Winchester’s lever action rifles.

 

The .32 Remington cartridge dates to 1906 and its introduction by Remington in the Remington Model 8 rifle. Other rifles chambered for the .32 Remington include the Remington Model 81, Remington Model 14 slide-action, Remington Model 30 bolt action, Stevens Model 425 lever-action, and Standard Arms Company rifles. Due to their similar dimensions, the .25 Remington, .30 Remington, and .32 Remington together were known as the Remington Rimless cartridge series.[2] Firearm manufacturers generally offered all three of these cartridges as chamberings in a rifle model rather than just one of the series.

 

This cartridge was chambered in the Remington Model 141 also. The 35 Remington was also a part of the old Remington rimless lineup, although it is based on a rimless version of the .30-40 Krag. This cartridge is a ballistic twin of the 32 Winchester Special.

.32 Winchester Self-Loading

 

Winchester introduced the .32SL and .35SL cartridges in the Winchester ’05 self-loading rifle, a centerfire version of the Winchester ’03. The .32SL never gained popularity as a hunting cartridge, although it may be suitable for the largest small game such as fox and coyote at ranges under 150 yards.[1] Both the .32SL and .35SL were soon superseded by the introduction of the more powerful .351SL in the Winchester ’07.[2]

 

When first introduced however, the notable firearm expert Townsend Whelen noted the .32SL cartridge as displaying similar ballistics as the .32-40 Winchester black powder, low-pressure cartridge.[3] He further suggests the best use of the .32 SL as being for rapid-fire target shooting for ranges up to 300 yards. Within such ranges, it is quite an accurate cartridge.

 

In October 1940. an Army Ordnance circular suggested development of a light rifle using a .30 caliber cartridge similar to the “Winchester Self-loading Cartridge, Caliber .32” to replace the pistol and submachine gun. This led to the production of the “Caliber .30 SL, M1” cartridge directly based on the .32 SL in February 1941 and, after a design competition, adoption of the Winchester-designed M1 carbine in October 1941.[4]

.32 Winchester Special

 

The .32 Winchester Special (or .32 WS) is a rimmed cartridge created in October 1901 for use in the Winchester Model 94 lever-action rifle.[2] It is similar in name but unrelated to the .32-20 Winchester cartridge (which is also known as .32 WCF).

.32-20 Winchester (.32 WCF, .32-20 Marlin, .32 Colt Lightning)

.32-40 Ballard

 

The .32-20 Winchester, also known as .32 WCF (Winchester center fire), was the first small-game lever-action cartridge that Winchester produced.[2] It was initially introduced as a black-powder cartridge in 1882 for small-game, varmint hunting, and deer.[3][4] Colt produced a single-action revolver chambered for this cartridge a few years later.[5]

 

The name .32-20 refers to the 32 caliber bullet of .312-inch-diameter (7.9 mm) and standard black-powder charge of 20 grains (1.3 g).

.32-40 Winchester
Introduced in 1884, the .32-40 was developed as a black powder match-grade round for the Ballard single-shot Union Hill No. 8 and 9 target rifles. Using a 165-grain (10.7 g) bullet over 40 grains (2.6 g) of black powder (muzzle velocity 1,440 ft/s (440 m/s), muzzle energy 755 ft·lbf (1,024 J)), the factory load gained a reputation for fine accuracy, with a midrange trajectory of 11 inches (28 cm) at 200 yd (180 m).[2] It was available in Winchester and Marlin lever rifles beginning in 1886.[2] It stopped being a factory chambering around 1940.[2]

 

It provides performance sufficient for deer at up to 300 yards (270 m) in a modern rifle, for which it can be loaded to about equal the .30-30.[2] It is more than enough for varmints, including coyotes and wolves, or medium-sized game.

 

The .32-40 also served as the basis for Harry Pope’s wildcat .33-40.

.325 Winchester Short Magnum

 

The .325 Winchester Short Magnum, commonly known as the 325 WSM is a 8mm caliber rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire short magnum medium bore cartridge. The cartridge was introduced by Winchester Ammunition in 2005.[1][2]

 

The name of the cartridge is a misnomer as the bullet diameter is .323 in (8.2 mm).[3] Introduced at the 2005 Shot Show in Las Vegas, NV, it is the largest member of the Winchester Short Magnum family of cartridges. The .325 WSM was intended for the hunting of medium and large bodied thin skinned dangerous and non-dangerous big game animals of Africa, Asia, Europe and North America.[3]

.333 Jeffery Flanged

 

The .333 Jeffery and .333 Jeffery Flanged are medium bore centrefire rifle cartridges developed by W.J. Jeffery & Co and introduced in 1908.

.40 caliber – .50 caliber

.40-454 JDJ

.44-40 Winchester

 

The .44-40 Winchester, also known as .44 Winchester, .44 WCF (Winchester Center Fire), and .44 Largo (in Spanish speaking countries) was introduced in 1873 by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. It was the first metallic centerfire cartridge manufactured by Winchester, and was promoted as the standard chambering for the new Winchester Model 1873 rifle.[1][2] As both a rifle and a handgun caliber, the cartridge soon became widely popular, so much so that the Winchester Model 1873 rifle became known as “The gun that won the West.”[3]

.45-70 Government

 

The .45-70 rifle cartridge, also known as . 45-70 Government, was developed at the U.S. Army’s Springfield Armory for use in the Springfield Model 1873, which is known to collectors as the “trapdoor Springfield”. The new cartridge was a replacement for the stop-gap .50-70 Government cartridge which had been adopted in 1866, one year after the end of the American Civil War.

.400 H&H Magnum

 

The .400 H&H Magnum also known as the .400 Holland & Holland Belted Rimless or the .400 Holland & Holland Magnum is a .411 caliber belted rimless bottlenecked cartridge introduced in 2003 by Holland & Holland together with the .465 H&H Magnum in 2003. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum case.

.400 Jeffery Nitro Express

 

The .400 Jeffery Nitro Express or .450/400 3-inch Nitro Express is a medium bore, bottlenecked, Nitro Express cartridge designed by W.J. Jeffery & Co in 1902, intended for use in single shot and double rifles.

.401 Winchester Self-Loading

 

The .401 Winchester Self-Loading (also called .401SL or .401WSL) is an American rifle cartridge.

 

Winchester introduced the .401SL in the Winchester ’10 self-loading rifle as a supplement to the Winchester ’07 and the .351SL in their offering of hi-power, self-loading rifles. The only chambering available in the Winchester Model 1910, the .401SL was used by France, Russia, and American company security forces in the First World War.[1]

 

The .401SL proved powerful enough for both deer and other large game at ranges under 150 yards.[2] Both 200gr and 250gr bullet weights were offered by Winchester and other ammunition manufacturers as factory loadings. With extra available detachable magazines holding 4-rounds each, the Model ’10, could provide lots of firepower for the big-game hunter. This feature helped promote the use of the .401SL on dangerous game such as moose and grizzly bear in spite of the lack of controlled expansion bullet designs, which doubtlessly would have improved game-taking performance and the subsequent reputation of the .401SL cartridge.[3]

 

The .401 SL is of similar size to the later .41 Remington Magnum; but the longer self-loading rifle cartridge produced a muzzle energy of 2,000 foot-pounds force (2,700 J) with a 200-grain (13 g) bullet,[4] while the magnum revolver is credited with a muzzle energy of 790 foot-pounds force (1,070 J) with a 210-grain (14 g) bullet.[5] The .41 Rem magnum revolver comparison is not entirely relevant, however, since in a carbine the same cartridge generally at least doubles its energy over the much shorter barreled version.[citation needed]

.404 Jeffery

 

The .404 Jeffery is a large-caliber, rimless cartridge[4] designed for large, dangerous game, such as the “Big Five” (elephant, rhino, cape buffalo, lion and leopard) of Africa. Other names for this cartridge include .404 Jeffery Rimless, .404 Rimless Nitro Express, and 10.75× 73mm. It was created by W.J. Jeffery & Co of England based on their desire to duplicate performance of the .450/400 (3¼”) cartridge.[5] There are two basically similar sets of dimensions for this case, depending on the manufacturer.[6] The .404 Jeffery as originally loaded fired a .423″ diameter bullet of either 300 gr (19 g) with a muzzle velocity of 2,600 ft/s (790 m/s) and muzzle energy of 4,500 foot-pounds force (6,100 N·m) or 400 gr (26 g) with a muzzle velocity of 2,125 ft/s (648 m/s) and 4,020 foot-pounds force (5,450 N·m) of energy.[7] It is very effective on large game and is favored by many hunters of dangerous game. Performance and recoil are similar to other African dangerous game cartridges. The .404 Jeffery was popular with hunters and game wardens in Africa because it gave good performance with a manageable level of recoil. By way of comparison, the .416 Rigby and .416 Remington Magnum both fire a 400 grain .416 in bullet at 2,400 feet per second (730 m/s) with a muzzle energy of approximately 5,000 foot-pounds force (6,800 N·m), which handily exceeds the ballistic performance of the .404 Jeffery but at the price of greater recoil and, in the case of the .416 Rigby, rifles that are significantly more expensive.

.405 Winchester

 

The .405 Winchester (also known as the .405 WCF) is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced in 1904 for the Winchester 1895 lever-action rifle.[2] It remains to this day the most powerful rimmed cartridge designed specifically for lever-action rifles; the only modern lever action cartridge that approaches its performance is the .450 Marlin, introduced in 2000. The .405 was highly regarded by U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt during his safari in East Africa.[3]

.408 CheyTac

 

The .408 Cheyenne Tactical (or .408 CheyTac) is a specialized rimless, bottlenecked, centerfire cartridge for military long-range sniper rifles that was developed by Dr. John D. Taylor and machinist William O. Wordman. The round was designed with a possible military need for a cartridge for anti-personnel, anti-sniper and anti-materiel roles with a (supersonic) precision range of 2,200 yards (2,000 m). It is offered as a competitor to the most common military NATO long-range service cartridges such as .338 Lapua Magnum and the .50 BMG.

.416 Barrett

 

The .416 Barrett or 10.6×83mm centerfire rifle cartridge is a proprietary bottlenecked centrefire rifle cartridge designed in 2005. It is an alternative to the .50 BMG in long-range high-power rifles. It was designed in response to a request for a medium/heavy rifle/cartridge combination that was issued from Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division in late 2004. Its metric size is 10.6×83mm.

.416 Remington Magnum

 

The .416 Remington Magnum is a .416 caliber (10.6 mm) of a belted bottle-necked design. The cartridge was intended as a dangerous game hunting cartridge and released to the public in 1989. The cartridge uses the case of the 8 mm Remington Magnum as a parent cartridge. When the cartridge was released in 1988, author Frank C. Barnes considered the .416 Remington Magnum to be the “most outstanding factory cartridge introduced in decades”.[2]

 

The cartridge was conceived as a less costly alternative to the .416 Rigby cartridge and was intended to replace the latter. While today the .416 Remington Magnum is considered in the field the most popular of the .416 cartridges,[3] the .416 Remington did not replace the .416 Rigby as had been anticipated. Rather, it sparked a renewed interest in the .416 caliber (10.36 mm) cartridges which led to the revival of the .416 Rigby and the introduction of other .416 cartridges such as the .416 Weatherby Magnum and the .416 Ruger.

 

The .416 Remington Magum is one of the more popular dangerous game cartridges used for the hunting of dangerous game in Africa. It also has been increasingly used in North America, in Alaska in particular for the hunting of and as a defense against large bears.[3]

.416 Rigby

 

The .416 Rigby or 10.6×74mm was designed in 1911 by John Rigby,[2] of John Rigby & Company, as a dangerous game cartridge. It is the first to use a bullet with a diameter of 10.6 millimetres (0.416 in). The rifles, as built by John Rigby & Co., were initially made up on Mauser magnum-length actions, although in later years, some were made on standard length actions, a perfect example being the rifle used by legendary professional hunter Harry Selby.[3] Other famous users of the cartridge were Commander David Enderby Blunt, John Taylor, and Jack O’Connor.

.416 Ruger

 

The .416 Ruger is .41 caliber (10.4mm), a beltless, rimless, bottlenecked cartridge designed as a joint venture by Hornady and Ruger in 2008.

.416 Weatherby Magnum
The .416 Weatherby Magnum is a belted, bottlenecked cartridge designed by Ed Weatherby and launched commercially in 1989. It is a dangerous-game cartridge intended for the hunting of heavy dangerous game such as elephant and African Cape buffalo. It is considered the most powerful commercial .416 cartridge, besting the Remington, Rigby and Ruger .416s by a velocity of 300 ft/s (91 m/s). Unlike earlier Weatherby cartridges which were designed by Roy Weatherby, this cartridge was designed by his son Ed Weatherby.

 

Beginning in the 1960s and through the 1970s, safari hunting in Africa was on the decline, and in turn demand for big-bore cartridges waned. Furthermore, the introduction of the .458 Winchester Magnum, which could be chambered in inexpensive rifles, further put a nail in the coffin of other big-bore cartridges such as the .416 Rigby, which required an oversized rifle action. Due to the lack of interest, ammunition manufacturers like Kynoch ceased operations.

 

However, by the 1980s, a renewed interest in safari hunting created a demand for big-bore dangerous-game cartridges. In 1988 Remington stepped up to the plate with their iteration of the .416 Hoffman, which was given the name .416 Remington Magnum. Unlike the Rigby, the Remington cartridge utilized the .375 H&H Magnum case and therefore, unlike the .416 Rigby, could be chambered in most firearm actions.

 

Taking advantage of this momentum, Weatherby introduced their own .416 cartridge in 1989; it was based on the .378 Weatherby Magnum cartridge, which was necked up to accept a .416 in (10.6 mm) bullet.

.444 Marlin

 

The .444 Marlin (10.9x57mmR) is a rifle cartridge designed in 1964 by Marlin Firearms and Remington Arms. It was designed to fill in a gap left by the older .45-70 when that cartridge was not available in any new lever action rifles; at the time it was the largest lever-action cartridge available.[1] The .444 resembles a lengthened .44 Magnum and provides a significant increase in velocity. It is usually used in the Marlin 444 lever-action Rifle.

.450/400 Nitro Express

 

The .450/400 Nitro Express is a Nitro Express rifle cartridge that produced in two case lengths, 2⅜-inches and 3¼-inches,[2] intended for use in single shot and double rifles, the latter is considered a classic Nitro Express cartridge.

.450 Bushmaster

 

The .450 Bushmaster is a rifle cartridge developed by Tim LeGendre of LeMag Firearms, and licensed to Bushmaster Firearms International. The .450 Bushmaster is designed to be used in the standard M16s and AR-15s, using modified magazines and upper receiver assemblies.

.450 Marlin

 

The .450 Marlin is a firearms cartridge designed as a modernized equivalent to the venerable .45-70 lever-action cartridge. It was designed by a joint team of Marlin and Hornady engineers headed by Hornady’s Mitch Mittelstaedt,[4] and was released in 2000, with cartridges manufactured by Hornady and rifles manufactured by Marlin, mainly the Model 1895M levergun. The Browning BLR is also now available in .450 Marlin chambering. Marlin ceased manufacture of the 1895M rifle in 2009. It is not known if or when this model will be available again.

.450 Nitro Express

 

 

.450 Nitro Express also known as the .450 3¼-inch Nitro Express was designed for the purpose of hunting large game such as elephant. This cartridge is used almost exclusively in single shot and double express rifles for hunting in the Tropics or hot climates in general and is a cartridge associated with the Golden Age of African safaris and Indian shikars.

.450 Rigby

 

The .450 Rigby Magnum Rimless, better known simply as the .450 Rigby, is a .45 caliber (11.6 mm) rimless, bottlenecked cartridge intended for the hunting of heavy dangerous game. The cartridge is based on the .416 Rigby necked up to accept a .458-inch (11.6 mm) bullet. The cartridge is intended for use in magazine rifles.[1] The cartridge should not be confused with Rigby’s .450 Nitro Express from around 1898, which is a rimmed cartridge that is intended for double rifles.

.458×2 American

 

The .458×2-inch American was designed as a medium power big bore cartridge by Frank Barnes for North American big game. Frank Barnes found that the .458 Winchester Magnum and the .460 Weatherby Magnum too powerful for North American big game and believed that a cartridge of lesser power would be ample for the task.[1]

 

The cartridge has the power required to take all North American big game species. It is also adequate for African dangerous game in close cover.[1]

 

The .450 Marlin and the .458×2-inch American are very similar cartridges. The cartridges are essentially the same length. However, the .450 Marlin will not chamber in the .458×2-inch American as the belt on the .450 Marlin is considerably wider. The .458×2-inch American should not be fired in a .450 Marlin as failures may occur. While not interchangeable, the .458×2-inch American will do anything the .450 Marlin is capable of accomplishing,[2] and converting such a rifle to .450 Marlin is fairly straightforward.

 

The .458×2-inch American was intended for bolt action rifles. The first rifle chambered for the cartridge was a Remington Model 722. The cartridge also can be chambered for the Winchester Model 94 lever action rifle.[1]

 

Ammunition can be made from .375 H&H Magnum cases and cases derived from it, including the .458 Winchester Magnum. Dies are available from RCBS and chamber reamers from H&M Tool Company.[1]

.458 Express

 

The .458 Express is a .458 diameter (caliber) cartridge developed in South Africa. It is also referred to as the .458 3-inch.

 

Other .458 cartridges are the very popular .458 Lott, .458 Winchester Magnum and 450 Watts. Weatherby made the .460 Weatherby which is still one of the fastest commercial cartridges available on the market in this category.

 

There are a vast number of .458 cartridges on the market. At Rhino Bullets at http://www.rhinobullets.co.za/ several .458 Lott and .458 Winchester Magnum owners write about their experience. The .458 Express is largely unknown outside South Africa! Hardly any writers give comprehensive reports and ballistic tests for the cartridge. In the Reloaders Nest at www.reloadersnet.com a couple of reports can be seen of the .458 Express.

 

This unique cartridge originated in Africa, accommodating harsh African conditions, and less efficient South African rifle powders. It has a broad spectrum of reloading options and is capable of long-range, flat trajectory shooting, or close-up Big Five hunting shots, using the heaviest of bullets available in this caliber.

.458 Lott

 

The .458 Lott is a .458 caliber belted hunting cartridge designed as a replacement for the less powerful .458 Winchester Magnum. It is based on the full length .375 H&H Magnum blown out and shortened to 2.800 inches (71.1 mm). The cartridge is designed for the purpose of hunting African dangerous game.[1]

 

The .458 Lott was designed in response to perceived inadequacies and problems encountered with the .458 Winchester Magnum. While the cartridge was slow to gain popularity at first, it is now becoming the standard by which dangerous game cartridges are judged.[citation needed] The cartridge provides a distinct step up in performance over the .458 Winchester Magnum. A-Square, Česká Zbrojovka/Brno, Hornady and Ruger have been instrumental in the cartridge’s rise in popularity.

.458 Sabi

 

.458 SOCOM

 

The .458 SOCOM (11.63×40mm) is a moderately large round designed for a specialized upper receiver that can be mounted on any AR-15 pattern lower receiver. The 300-grain (19 g) round offers a supersonic muzzle velocity of 1,900 ft/s (580 m/s) and 2,405 ft·lbf (3,261 J),[1] similar to .45-70 but with a much smaller case suited to an automatic type action.

.458 Winchester Magnum

 

The .458 Winchester Magnum is a belted, straight-taper cased, dangerous game rifle cartridge. It was introduced commercially in 1956 by Winchester and first chambered in the Winchester Model 70 African rifle.[2] It was designed to compete against the .450 Nitro Express and the .470 Nitro Express cartridges used in big bore British double rifles. The .458 Winchester Magnum remains one of the most popular dangerous game cartridges. Most major ammunition manufacturers offer a selection of .458 ammunition for rifles chambered in the cartridge.

.460 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .460 Weatherby Magnum is a belted, bottlenecked rifle cartridge, developed by Roy Weatherby in 1957. The cartridge is based on the .378 Weatherby Magnum necked up to accept the .458-inch (11.6 mm) bullet. The original .378 Weatherby Magnum parent case was inspired by the .416 Rigby.[2] The .460 Weatherby Magnum was designed as an African dangerous game rifle cartridge for the hunting of heavy, thick skinned dangerous game.

 

The .460 Weatherby Magnum was the world’s most powerful commercially available sporting cartridge for 29 years until the advent of the .700 Nitro Express by Holland & Holland, London, England, in 1988 developing approximately an average energy of 8,900 foot-pounds (12,100 J) of muzzle energy with a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet at 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). However handloaders can push the cartridge to generate as much as 15,000 foot-pounds (20,000 J) of energy in a modern bolt action, by using a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet fired at 2,600 ft/s (792 m/s). However, doing so necessitates a rifle so heavy it is almost inoperable for hunting purposes. The .700 Nitro Express was itself eclipsed in only five years by the 1993 introduction by A-Square of the .577 Tyrannosaur. The .577 T-Rex develops approximately 10,180 foot-pounds force (13,800 J) with a velocity of 2,460 ft/s (750 m/s).

 

The .460 will launch a 500-grain (32 g) bullet at a chronographed velocity of 2,700 ft/s (820 m/s) from a 26-inch (660 mm) barrel, measuring 8,100 ft·lbf (11,000 J) of muzzle energy.[3] Prior to the arrival of the .460 Weatherby Magnum on the hunting scene, the .600 Nitro Express had been considered to be the most powerful cartridge in terms of energy.[4]

.460 Steyr 

The .460 Steyr Chambering — Bigger than the .416 Barrett
While most of you are familiar with the legendary .50 BMG chambering, you may be curious about the “.460 Steyr”. This cartridge was developed by Steyr to provide superb ultra-long-range ballistics with less recoil than the .50 BMG. Like its .50 BMG big brother, the .460 Steyr can launch bullets that stay supersonic well past 1500 meters. The .460 Steyr was designed by Horst Grillmayer (Austria) in 2002, and the projectiles were designed by Guido Wasser (Switzerland). Production of rifle and cartridge started in 2004. The .460 Steyr was a way to offer an ultra-long range, sporting/sniper rifle and cartridge in juridictions which banned 50-caliber rifles. As with the .416 Barrett cartridge, the .460 Steyr cartridge was developed by shortening and necking down the .50 BMG case; however, the .460 Steyr is longer than the 416 Barrett.

.465 H&H Magnum

 

.

 

The .465 Holland & Holland Magnum also known as the .465 Holland & Holland Belted Magnum or more simply as the .465 H&H Magnum, is a modern big bore firearms cartridge introduced by Holland & Holland in 2003 together with the .400 H&H Magnum. The .465 H&H Magnum is a .468 caliber, belted, rimless bottlenecked cartridge. The cartridge is a necked-up, shoulder-lowered tapered cartridge based on the .378 Weatherby Magnum case.

.470 Nitro Express

 

The .470 Nitro Express is a cartridge developed by Joseph Lang in England for very large or dangerous game hunting. This cartridge is used almost exclusively in single shot and double express rifles for hunting in the tropics or hot climate. It is in wide use in the Southern and Central-East African region, favoured by hunting guides, primarily while out for Cape buffalo and elephant.

.476 Nitro Express

 

The .476 Nitro Express is one of several rounds (including the .500/465 Nitro Express, .470 Nitro Express, .475 Nitro Express, and .475 No. 2 Nitro Express) developed as a replacement for the .450 Nitro Express following the British Army 1907 ban of .450 caliber ammunition into India and the Sudan, all with comparable performance.[2]

 

Westley Richards created the .476 Nitro Express by necking down the .500 Nitro Express 3″.[3]

.338 Edge

 

338 Edge (.338/300 Ultra Mag, .338 Ultra Cat) is a Wildcat rifle cartridge based on the .300 Remington Ultra Magnum round necked up to accept 0.338″ diameter bullets.[1] It is gaining popularity as a long-range cartridge due to the wide availability of 0.338″ projectiles with favorable ballistics. For instance, the 300-grain (19 g) Sierra Match King has a ballistic coefficient of 0.765[2] and is a popular choice for 338 Edge shooters.

.338 Federal

 

The .338 Federal is a rifle cartridge based on the .308 Winchester case necked up to .33 caliber. It was created by Federal Cartridge and Sako in 2006 and intended as a big game cartridge with reasonable recoil for lightweight rifles.[3]

.338 Lapua Magnum

 

The .338 Lapua Magnum (8.6×70mm or 8.58×70mm) is a rimless, bottlenecked, centerfire rifle cartridge. It was developed during the 1980s as a high-powered, long-range cartridge for military snipers. It was used in the Afghanistan War and the Iraq War. As a result of this, it became more widely available. The loaded cartridge is 14.93 mm (0.588 in) in diameter (rim) and 93.5 mm (3.68 in) long. It can penetrate better-than-standard military body armour at ranges up to 1,000 metres (1,090 yd) and has a maximum effective range of about 1,750 metres (1,910 yd). Muzzle velocity is dependent on barrel length, seating depth and powder charge, and varies from 880 to 915 m/s (2,890 to 3,000 ft/s) for commercial loads with 16.2-gram (250 gr) bullets, which corresponds to about 6,525 J (4,813 ft·lbf) of muzzle energy.

 

British military issue overpressure .338 Lapua Magnum cartridges with a 91.4 mm (3.60 in) overall length, loaded with 16.2-gram (250 gr) LockBase B408 very-low-drag bullets fired at 936 m/s (3,071 ft/s) muzzle velocity from a L115A3 Long Range Rifle were used in November 2009 by British sniper Corporal of Horse (CoH) Craig Harrison to establish a new record for the longest confirmed sniper kill in combat, at a range of 2,475 m (2,707 yd).[4][5]

 

In addition to its military role, it is increasingly used by hunters and civilian long-range shooting enthusiasts. The .338 Lapua Magnum is capable of taking down any game animal, though its suitability for some dangerous game (Cape buffalo, hippopotamus, white rhinoceros, and elephant) is arguable, unless accompanied by a larger “backup” calibre: “There is a huge difference between calibres that will kill an elephant and those that can be relied upon to stop one.”[6] In Namibia the .338 Lapua Magnum is legal for hunting Africa’s Big five game if the loads have ≥ 5,400 J (3,983 ft·lbf) muzzle energy.[7]

.338 Marlin express

 

The .338 Marlin Express is a new cartridge developed by Marlin Firearms and Hornady. It is based on the .376 Steyr with a goal to duplicate the venerable .30-06 Springfield’s performance in a cartridge compatible with lever-action firearms. The cartridge uses a slightly shorter, rimmed case to function in lever action rifles with tubular magazines. As introduced in Hornady’s LEVERevolution line of cartridges, it follows the design logic of the .308 Marlin Express which preceded it. The .338MX fires heavier .338 caliber bullets than the .308 Marlin Express at roughly the same velocity. It is chambered in Marlin’s Model 338MX and 338MXLR rifles using the Marlin Model 336 action.[1]

.338 Norma Magnum

 

The .338 Norma Magnum is a cartridge first introduced in 2008 and coming into production in 2009, designed by Norma of Sweden.

.338 Remington Ultra Magnum

 

The .338 Remington Ultra Magnum is a .338 caliber rifle cartridge introduced by Remington Arms in 2002.

.338 Ruger Compact Magnum

 

The .338 Ruger Compact Magnum or .338 RCM is a rimless, short-length rifle cartridge based on the .375 Ruger case. It was designed by Sturm Ruger and Hornady and released in 2008 and chambered in various Ruger rifles. The goal was to create a shorter cartridge than the big .338 magnums that would fit in a more compact rifle with nearly the same performance. Similar to the design ideas for the WSM cartridge family, but somewhat narrower which will frequently allow one more cartridge in the rifle magazine than the WSM equivalent.[2] This round is designed for hunting medium to large sized North American game.

.338 Winchester Magnum

 

The .338 Winchester Magnum is a .338 in (8.6 mm) caliber, belted, rimless, bottlenecked cartridge introduced in 1958 by Winchester Repeating Arms. It is based on the blown-out, shortened .375 H&H Magnum.[2] The .338 in (8.6 mm) is the caliber at which medium-bore cartridges are considered to begin. The .338 Winchester Magnum is the first choice among professional brown bear (specifically grizzly bear) guides in Alaska to back up clients where a powerful stopping caliber is required on charging bears.[3] It is also the most popular medium-bore cartridge in North America[4] and has the most widely available choice in rifles among medium bore rifles. The action length is the same as a 30-06 and most major rifle manufacturers in the United States chamber rifles for the cartridge including the semi-automatic Browning BAR Mk II Safari making it a very powerful combination against charging dangerous game.[5][6] The cartridge was intended for larger North American big-game species and has found use as for the hunting of thin-skinned African plains-game species.[1]

.338-06 A-Square

 

The .338-06 is a wildcat cartridge based on the .30-06. It allows heavier .338 caliber bullets to be used from the .30-06 non-belted case. This is a better choice for heavy bodied game such as moose, elk, and brown bear than the .30-06. 338 caliber bullets became more widely available after the introduction in the late 1950s of the .338 Winchester Magnum cartridge, frequently chambered in the Winchester Model 70 rifle. The .338-06 maintains much of the benefits of the .338 Magnum cartridge but has substantially less recoil, makes more efficient use of powder, and allows use of widely available .30-06 commercial and military cases. It is similar in concept to the .333 OKH as well as the .35 Whelen, which also use the .30-06 brass case as a basis for the cartridge. Thanks to the large number of rifles based on the .30-06 family of cartridges, having a .338-06 made usually only requires a simple barrel change by a competent gun smith. A-Square adopted the caliber as the .338-06 A-Square in approximately 1998, and was approved by SAAMI as a standardized caliber. Weatherby offered factory rifles and ammunition, but has now dropped the rifles from its inventory. The 338-06 A-Square tends to have a velocity advantage over the .35 Whelen and uses bullets that retain velocity and resist wind drift better than similar weight bullets fired from the .35 Whelen.

.338-378 Weatherby Magnum

The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum started out as the wildcat cartridge, .338-378 Keith-Thomson Magnum during the early 1960s. Keith and Thomson are Elmer Keith and R.W. “Bob” Thomson. The 338-378 Keith-Thomson Magnum is a quarter of an inch shorter than the full length 338-378 Weatherby Magnum, this was because they thought it was better balanced with the slowest powder generally available at that time (H4831). The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum was added to the Weatherby product line in 1998.

 

The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum’s parent case is the .378 Weatherby Magnum. The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum is created by necking down the .378 Weatherby Magnum to 8.59 mm (.338 in) then fire forming it in the rifle chamber. The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum has a case capacity of about 8.1 g (125 gr). Bullets commercially available for the .338-378 Weatherby Magnum range from: 11.7 g (180 gr) to 19.4 g (300 gr) in the construction of; boat-tail hollow-point; boat-tail pointed soft; pointed soft point; heavy jacketed pointed soft point; partition; multi-core; truncated solid and monolithic solid.

 

The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum’s main appeal is long-range shooting. A Weatherby factory cartridge loaded with a 16.2 g (250 gr) hunting bullet, in a rifle with a 71 cm (28 in) barrel will yield a muzzle velocity of 933 m/s (3060 ft/s) and muzzle energy of 7046 J (5197 ft·lbf). This same bullet will carry a down range velocity to 457 m (500 yd) of 648 m/s (2125 ft/s) and energy of 3391 J (2501 ft · lbf).

 

A hand loaded .338-378 Weatherby Magnum used for 1000 yd target shooting loaded with a 19.4 g (300 gr) boat-tail hollow point from a rifle with a 71 cm (28 in) target barrel will yield a muzzle velocity of 917 m/s (3010 ft/s), at 914 m (1000 yd) will carry a down range velocity of 590 m/s (1936 ft/s) and at 1372 m (1500 yd) will still be carrying a supersonic down range velocity of 462 m/s (1517 ft/s).

 

The .338-378 Weatherby Magnum is appropriate for hunting all game animals on the North American, European and Asian continents. In Africa the 338-378 Weatherby Magnum is appropriate for taking medium and large game.

 

The free recoil of the 338-378 Weatherby Magnum from a (11 lb) rifle (including magazine rounds, scope, base and rings) is 73 J (54 ft · lbf) as compared to an average 27 J (20 ft · lbf) from a rifle chambered for .30-06 Springfield.

 

The Finnish .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge introduced in 1989 and the American .338 Remington Ultra Magnum (.338 RUM) cartridge introduced in 2000 are probably the closest currently (2007) commercially available ballistic twins of the .338-378 Weatherby Magnum. The .338 Lapua Magnum is however a rimless cartridge and the .338 Remington Ultra Magnum is a rebated rim cartridge.

.340 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .340 Weatherby Magnum rifle cartridge was introduced in 1963 by creator Roy Weatherby in response to the .338 Winchester Magnum.[1] The .340 Weatherby Magnum uses the same .338 in. diameter bullets as the .338 Winchester Magnum but it does so at greater velocity than its Winchester competition. Reloaders may have trouble matching the published Weatherby velocities as Weatherby factory ammunition is loaded to maximum specifications.[2] Weatherby no longer loads the 250gr. round-nose cartridge pictured but continues to load the 250 gr. Spire Point and 250 gr. Nosler Partition. Weatherby has also expanded their factory loads including Nosler Ballistic-tip and Barnes TSX bullets complementing the powerful cartridge.[3] Currently A-square is the only other factory ammunition producer of the .340 Weatherby Magnum which has led to limited popularity of the caliber. In field tests the .340 clearly out performs the 300 Ultra mag, .338 win mag. and even rivals the larger .375 H&H, providing a much flatter shooting and harder hitting performance.

 

This cartridge is powerful enough for even the largest North American game and is suitable for most African game as well.[4]

.348 Winchester

 

The .348 Winchester is an American rifle cartridge. It was introduced in 1936, and developed for the Winchester Model 71 lever action rifle. The .348 was one of the most powerful rimmed rounds ever used in a lever action rifle.[1]

.35 Remington

 

The .35 Remington [8.9x49mm] is the only remaining cartridge from Remington’s lineup of medium-power rimless cartridges still in commercial production. Introduced in 1906, it was originally chambered for the Remington Model 8 semi-automatic rifle in 1908.[3]

 

It is also known as 9x49mm Browning and 9mm Don Gonzalo.

.35 Whelen

 

The .35 Whelen is a powerful medium-bore rifle cartridge that does not require a magnum action or a magnum bolt-face. The parent of this cartridge is the .30-06 Springfield, which is necked-up to accept a bullet diameter of .358 in (9.1 mm). This cartridge is more powerful than its parent, especially in killing power on large game.

.35 Winchester

 

The .35 Winchester (colloquially .35 Win) cartridge was created in 1903 by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company for use in the Winchester Model 1895 lever-action rifle, and was also available in the bolt action Remington-Lee,[1] or the Model E-10 Factory Sporter Ross Rifle in Canada.

.35 Winchester Self-Loading

 

The .35 Winchester Self-Loading (also called .35SL, .35SLR, or .35WSL) is an American rifle cartridge.

 

Winchester introduced the .32SL and .35SL in the Winchester ’05 self-loading rifle as a centerfire cartridge version of the Winchester ’03. The .35SL proved popular at first with the general public as a short-range deer and black bear hunting cartridge, but was soon superseded by the introduction of the more powerful .351SL in the Winchester ’07.[1]

 

Many now consider the .35SL inadequate as a deer round, but it may still be suitable for coyote or similar medium-sized game at close ranges. When first introduced however, the notable firearm expert Townsend Whelen noted the .35SL cartridge as displaying similar ballistics as the .38-40 black powder, low-pressure cartridge.[2]

.350 Remington Magnum

 

The .350 Remington Magnum was introduced in 1965 by Remington Arms Company for the Model 600 rifle. It was later offered in the Model 660 and Model 700 rifles but was discontinued as a regular factory chambering in 1974 after a poor sales record. Remington has also offered the Model Seven MS from their Custom Shop and a limited edition 700 Classic in recent years chambered in .350 Remington Magnum. Remington began chambering the round in the new Model 673 Guide Rifle in 2002.[2]

.351 Winchester Self-Loading

 

The .351 Winchester Self-Loading (also called .351 SL or .351 WSL) is an American rifle cartridge.

.356 Winchester

 

The .356 Winchester was developed using the case similar to that of the .308 Winchester but which featured a semi-rimmed design so as to operate through a lever-action rifle. Hence the .358 Winchester, which is essentially .308 Winchester necked up to accept a .358 in (9.1 mm) bullet, is very similar to that of the .356 Winchester, with the only difference being the design of the rim.

 

Performance of the .356 Winchester is close to that of the .358 Winchester giving up only 50–100 ft/s (15–30 m/s) with any bullet weight. However, the .356 has slightly less case capacity than the .358 Winchester due to its thicker brass case. Furthermore, heavier bullets will need to be seated more deeply than in the .358 Winchester as the cartridge has to function reliably through a lever rifle’s feeding mechanism. For these reasons the factory 250 gr (16 g) bullet loses about 90 ft/s (27 m/s) to the .358 Winchester while the 200 gr (13 g) factory load is only 30 ft/s (9.1 m/s) slower.

 

The Marlin Model 336ER was offered in .356 Winchester for several years, but was discontinued in 1987. The same year, Winchester ceased production of their Model 94s chambered for .356 Winchester. It was brought back immediately in 1988, but was again discontinued in the mid-1990s.

 

Despite its nomenclature, the .356 Winchester actually uses a .358 caliber bullet. Olin engineers who developed the .356 Winchester advise against loading it with anything other than flat-nose bullets if it is to be used in a tubular-magazine lever-rifle. If it were being loaded for use in a single-shot or double-rifle, any bullet type could be used.

.358 Norma Magnum

 

The .358 Norma Magnum (.358 NM or 9.1x64mmBR) is a bolt action rifle cartridge introduced in 1959 by Swedish company, Norma. It is closely related to the smaller-bullet .308 Norma Magnum. Both calibers share the same dimensions of the case head as the .300 H&H Magnum, but have far less body taper, resulting in the same internal capacity in a shorter case.[1] The cartridge case is the longest that will comfortably fit in a standard Mauser action, or any rifle action designed to chamber the 30-06. The .358 NM was the first .35 caliber cartridge commercially developed and sold to the American market since the decline of the .35 Newton in the late 1920s.

.358 Winchester

 

The .358 Winchester is a .35 caliber rifle cartridge based on a necked up .308 Winchester created by Winchester in 1955. The cartridge is also known in Europe as the 8.8x51mm.[2]

.375 H&H Magnum

 

The .375 Holland & Holland Magnum (9.5×72mmB) is a medium-bore rifle cartridge. The .375 H&H was only the second cartridge ever to feature a belt, now common among magnum rounds.[1] On these new rimless cartridges the belt replaced the rim in ensuring the correct headspace, which otherwise might be unreliable, given the narrow shoulder of the cartridge case.[2] The British company Holland & Holland introduced the cartridge in 1912 as the .375 Belted Rimless Nitro-Express. It initially used cordite propellant which was made in long strands – hence the tapered shape of this cartridge, which also ensured smooth chambering and extraction from a rifle’s breech.[3]

 

The .375 H&H often is cited as one of the most useful all-round rifle cartridges, especially in shooting large and dangerous game.[4] With relatively light bullets in the region of 235 to 270 grains (15 to 17 g), it is a flat-shooting, fairly long-range cartridge ideal for use on light to medium game, whereas with heavy bullets of 300 grains (19 g) and greater, it has the punch necessary for large, thick-skinned dangerous game. In many regions with thick-skinned dangerous game animals, the .375 H&H is seen as the minimum acceptable caliber, and in many places (in Africa, primarily) it is now the legal minimum for hunting such game. African game guides, professional hunters, and cullers of dangerous game have repeatedly voted the .375 H&H as their clear preference for an all-round caliber if they could only have one rifle. A similar preference has been expressed by Alaskan game guides for brown bear and polar bear country[3]

 

Unlike what is seen in most calibers, many .375 H&H rifles also achieve nearly the same point of impact over a wide range of bullet weights at all commonly used distances, further simplifying a professional hunter’s choice in selecting different grain bullets based upon the game hunted by requiring fewer scope or sight adjustments, which further serves to popularize the .375 H&H Magnum among professional hunters.[5][6]

.375 Remington Ultra Magnum
The .375 Remington Ultra Magnum, also known as the .375 RUM is a .375 rifle cartridge introduced by Remington Arms in 2000. The cartridge is intended for large and dangerous game.[1]

 

It is a beltless, rebated rim cartridge created by necking up the .300 Remington Ultra Magnum case to .375 caliber with no other changes.[1] Factory loadings are less powerful than handloads for the cartridge. Remington factory loads push a 300 grain (19 g) bullet at 2760 ft/s (840 m/s),[3] producing 5070 ft·lbf (6.88 kJ) of energy. A handloader can increase the muzzle velocity of a 220gr bullet to 3321 ft/s (900 m/s),[4] and develop 5800 ft·lbf (7.9 kJ).[5]

.375 Ruger

 

The .375 Ruger (9.5×65.5mm) is a rimless, standard-length rifle cartridge designed for the hunting of large dangerous game. It is designed to provide an increase in performance over the .375 H&H cartridge, yet to be chambered in a standard length action rifle. The cartridge was designed by Hornady and Ruger in partnership and released commercially in 2007 and chambered in the Ruger Hawkeye African and the Ruger Hawkeye Alaskan rifles.[2]

.375 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .375 Weatherby Magnum (9.5×73mmB) is a medium-bore rifle cartridge. The cartridge is a blown out, improved and provided with the Weatherby double radius shoulder – given the Weatherby treatment – version of the .375 H&H Magnum.[1][2] Unlike other improved versions of the .375 H&H Magnum like the .375 Ackley Improved, the .375 Weatherby Magnum is not a wildcat and existed as a proprietary cartridge until the CIP published specifications for the cartridge.

.375 Whelen (.375-06)

 

The .375 Whelen cartridge (A.K.A. 375-06) was developed in 1951 by L.R. “Bob” Wallack and named in honor of Colonel Townsend Whelen.[1] It is a .30-06 Springfield case necked up to .375.[1] While the .375 Whelen retains the .30-06’s shoulder angle of 17° 30′, an improved version was introduced with a 40°  angle, providing more case capacity as well as better headspacing.[1] The .375 Whelen Improved is favored by most.

.375 Winchester

 

The .375 Winchester is a modernized version of the .38-55 Winchester, a black powder cartridge from the 1880s. It was introduced in 1978 along with the Winchester Model 94 “Big Bore” lever action rifle.

 

Though very similar in appearance to the parent .38-55, the .375 has a shorter case length and operates at much higher pressures (50,000 CUP).

.376 Steyr

 

 

The .376 Steyr cartridge is a rifle cartridge jointly developed by Hornady and Steyr for use in the Steyr Scout rifle.

 

Introduced in 1999, it is based on the 9.3 x 64 Brenneke case, necked up to accept a 0.375-inch (9.5 mm) diameter bullet. The case is also shortened by about 4 mm to fit a standard length rifle action.

 

It was developed as an evolution of Jeff Cooper’s “Super Scout” medium rifle concept, which was in turn an extension of his original scout rifle concept. Cooper used a version of Steyr’s Scout rifle chambered in .350 Remington Magnum to hunt large and dangerous game, originally calling it a “Super Scout”. After taking a lion at close range with the weapon, he switched to calling that rifle his “Lion Scout”.

 

An additional motivation for development of the new cartridge was that authorities in certain areas of the world dictate a minimum caliber of round which may be used in hunting dangerous game such as cape buffalo and lion. In general the minimum is either .366 or .375 caliber, so to make the cartridge accepted in almost all African countries, the newly designed cartridge uses a 375 caliber bore.

 

When Steyr initially discussed the new round with Cooper, they intended to call it the .375 Steyr. Cooper said they should instead call it a .376, to avoid confusion with the .375 H&H Magnum.

 

Cooper subsequently referred to the Scout Rifle in .376 Steyr caliber as the “Dragoon” or “Dragoon Scout,” this marking being on the one that Steyr sent him. This designation has been dropped, and is not on production units.

 

With a higher felt recoil, the .376 Steyr is the largest practical cartridge for use in such a short, lightweight weapon as the Scout.

 

Steyr Mannlicher has also produced a conventional-style rifle to use this cartridge, dubbed the “Pro Hunter.”

.378 Weatherby Magnum

 

The .378 Weatherby Magnum was designed by Roy Weatherby in 1953.[3] It was an original belted magnum design with no parent case, inspired by the .416 Rigby and headspacing of the belted .375 H&H Magnum.[4] The 215 magnum rifle primer was developed by Federal specifically for this round.[4] The cartridge can hold upwards of 7.13 g (120 gr) of powder. The 378 Weatherby Magnum cartridge also has the double radius shoulder design found on the first and smaller proprietary line of Weatherby magnum cartridges.

 

The motivation behind the development of the .378 came from the disappointing performance gains of the improved,.375 Weatherby over its parent case, the .375 H&H Magnum.[5][6] Roy Weatherby in 1953 killed an African elephant with one shot while on safari. However, in using this event as a marketing tool, it was revealed some African countries have a minimum 10.16 mm (.40 caliber) bullet size for hunting dangerous game.[4] Weatherby responded by necking up the .378 to 11.63 mm (.458 caliber) and called the new cartridge the .460 Weatherby Magnum, which was introduced in 1958.[7]

 

It is considered a Safari grade cartridge. The .378 Weatherby Magnum is appropriate for taking all African game animals from large African antelopes, Nile crocodile, hippopotamus, to the Big Five game. Some hunters on the North American continent employ the .378 for American elk, Brown bears, and polar bears. Well known “Bip-Bip” in South of France employs as well the .378 for hunting radioactive boars [8].

 

The .378 Weatherby will generate considerable free recoil, an average of 104 J (77 ft·lbf) from a 4.1 kg (9 lb) rifle. This compares to 27 J (20 ft·lbf) from a rifle chambered for .30-06 Springfield or (36 ft·lbf) For the 375 H&H Magnum[9].

 

The .378 has been responsible for numerous wildcat cartridges, being necked-down as the .22 Eargesplitten Loudenboomer and necked-up as the .500 A-Square.[10][11] Some of the .378 Weatherby Magnum wildcat cartridges are shortened versions, like the .30-378 Arch (7.62 mm) and the .460 Short A-Square (11.63 mm).[12][13] Some .378-based wildcats have gone on to be part of the Weatherby line: .30-378, .338-378, .416 and .460.[14]

.38-40 Winchester
The .38-40 Winchester is actually a .40 caliber cartridge shooting .401 caliber bullets. The cartridge was introduced by Winchester in 1874 and is derived from their .44-40 Winchester. This cartridge was introduced for rifles, but in its reintroduction for Cowboy Action Shooting it has seen some popularity as a pistol cartridge. It is not particularly well suited to hunting larger game, but it was popular when it was introduced, along with the previous .44-40 Winchester, for deer hunting. It can be used successfully on smaller game animals, and for self-defense. Current loadings are intended for revolvers.[1]

.38-55 Winchester

 

The .38-55 Winchester cartridge (actually .3775 caliber) was introduced in 1876 by Ballard. It was used by Marlin Firearms from 1876 on for various single-shot target rifles and their 1893 lever action rifle. It was later offered by Winchester in its Model 1894. Winchester continued to use the round in various rifles until about 1940, and also used it in a few commemorative editions of rifles since then. In addition, Marlin offered it in some 336s and it was used in non-lever action rifles such as the Remington-Lee bolt-action and Colt’s New Lightning pump-action rifles.[1][2]

 

A modernized version of the cartridge debuted in 1978 as the .375 Winchester, designed with higher pressures and to be used in modern firearms only. It is not safe to fire factory .375 Win ammunition in rifles chambered in .38-55, especially in older examples. The brass is very similar (shorter by approx. 1 mm), but using modern, higher pressure .375 loads in an older rifle could cause serious injury to the shooter.[3]

 

The .38-55 is used to hunt black bear and deer at moderate ranges, and is also used in cowboy action shooting side matches.

.38-90 Winchester Express  

 

.38-44 UMC

 

.50 caliber and larger

.50 Alaskan

 

The .50 Alaskan is a wildcat cartridge developed by Harold Johnson and Harold Fuller of the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska in the 1950s. Johnson based the cartridge on the .348 Winchester in order to create a rifle capable of handling the large bears in Alaska.

.50 Beowulf

 

The .50 Beowulf is a rifle cartridge developed by Bill Alexander [1] of Alexander Arms for use in a modified AR-15 rifle.

.50 BMG

 

The .50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG, 12.7×99mm NATO and designated as the 50 Browning by the C.I.P.[1]) is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s. Entering service officially in 1921, the round is based on a greatly scaled-up .30-06 cartridge. Under STANAG 4383, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries. The cartridge itself has been made in many variants: multiple generations of regular ball, tracer, armor-piercing (AP), incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds. The rounds intended for machine guns are linked using metallic links.

 

The .50 BMG cartridge is also used in long-range target and anti-materiel rifles, as well as other .50-caliber machine guns.

 

A wide variety of ammunition is available, and the availability of match grade ammunition has increased the usefulness of .50 caliber rifles by allowing more accurate fire than lower quality rounds.[3]

.50 Peacekeeper

 

 

The .50 Peacekeeper is a wildcat rifle cartridge that was designed by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries. It uses a .460 Weatherby Magnum case that has been re-sized to accept a .510 in (13.0 mm) diameter bullet.

 

The .50 Peacekeeper is usually loaded with bullets that weigh in the range of 650 to 750 gr (42 to 49 g), and with muzzle velocities that range from 2,200 to 2,400 feet per second (670 to 730 m/s). A 750 gr (49 g) bullet fired at 2,205 ft/s (672 m/s) carries roughly 8,100 ft·lbf (11,000 J) of energy. Recoil in a 12 to 15 lb (5.4 to 6.8 kg) rifle is slightly less than that of a 30 lb (14 kg) rifle chambered in .50 BMG.[1]

.50-70 Government

 

The .50-70 Government cartridge was a black powder round adopted in 1866 for the Springfield Model 1866 Trapdoor Rifle

.50-90 Sharps

 

The .50-90 Sharps rifle cartridge is a black-powder cartridge that was introduced by Sharps Rifle Manufacturing Company in 1872 as a buffalo (American bison) hunting round. Like other large black-powder rounds, it incorporates a heavy bullet and a large powder volume, leading to high muzzle energies.

.50-110 Winchester

 

The .50-110 WCF (also known as the .50-100-450 WCF , with different loadings) is an obsolete American black powder centerfire rifle cartridge.

 

Introduced in 1899 for the Winchester Model 1886 repeater,[1] the .50-110 WCF was also available in single-shot weapons such as the Winchester 1885 Hi-Wall. Slight variations in charge weight in the same case led to the mistaken belief these were different rounds, when in fact they were not.[1]

 

Designed for black powder, the .50-110 was also available in a potent smokeless loading, comparable to British elephant rounds.[1] In power, the standard load was comparable to the contemporary British .500 Black Powder Express, [2] It is sufficient for elk, deer, moose, or bear at medium range or in woods,[3] and thin-skinned African game, but not dangerous animals such as elephant. The high-velocity smokeless load was in a class with the .444 Marlin,[4] and its power exceeded the .348[5] and .358 Winchester.[6]

 

Winchester continued to offer the cartridge commercially until 1935[1] and while it is still offered by some suppliers, due to its obsolescence and resultant obscurity, it is significantly more costly than more current cartridges — averaging from US$3 to $4 per round.[citation needed] Also in more modern guns like the new browning 1886 71 Winchester and the new 1886 Winchesters made in Japan are capable of much higher pressures and the 50–110 WCF can achieve up to 6,000 foot pounds of energy.

.50-140 Sharps

 

The .50-140 Sharps rifle cartridge is a black-powder cartridge that was introduced in 1884 as a big game hunting round.[1] It is believed to have been introduced for the Sharps-Borchardt Model 1878 rifle.[2] The cartridge is very similar to the .500 Nitro Express.[3]

 

This round was introduced by Winchester 3 years after the Sharps Rifle Company closed its doors in 1881. It is similar to, though larger than, the .50-90 Sharps.

.500 Black Powder Express

 

The .500 Black Powder Express was in fact a series of Black powder case of varying lengths that emerged in the 1860s.[1]

.500 Jeffery

 

The .500 Jeffery is a big-game rifle cartridge that first appeared around 1920, and was originally introduced by the August Schuler Company, a German firm, under the European designation “12.7×70mm Schuler” or “.500 Schuler”. When offered by the famed British outfitter W.J. Jeffery & Co, it was renamed the .500 Jeffery so as to be more palatable to British hunters and sportsmen following World War One.[1]

.500 Nitro Express 3″

.500 Nitro Express for black powder 3″

.500 No. 2 Express

The .577/500 No 2 Black Powder Express, also known as the 12.7mm British No 2, is a British centerfire fire rifle cartridge.

.500/450 Nitro Express

 

 

The .500/450 Magnum Nitro Express is a large bore centerfire rifle cartridge developed by Holland & Holland.

.500/465 Nitro Express

 

The .500/465 Nitro Express is a large bore centerfire rifle cartridge developed by Holland & Holland and introduced in 1907.

.505 Gibbs

 

The .505 Gibbs cartridge was designed by George Gibbs in 1911. The cartridge was originally known as the .505 Rimless Nitro Express or simply as the .505 Rimless. C.I.P. refers to the cartridge as the 505 Mag. Gibbs in their publications. It is a .50 caliber (12.8 mm) rimless bottlenecked cartridge intended for magazine-fed rifles.

.505 Jeffery

.510 DTC Europ

 

The .510 DTC EUROP is a French rifle cartridge developed by Eric Danis in order to comply with firearms legislation in Europe which regulates .50 BMG rifles. In response to the .50 Caliber BMG Regulation Act of 2004, which banned future sales of .50 BMG shoulder-fired rifles in California, long-range shooters in that state have begun to adopt this cartridge as a manner of following the new legislation.

 

The .510 DTC EUROP uses the same bullet as the .50 BMG, but has slightly different case dimensions. The case is 0.100 inches (2.5 mm) shorter and uses a steeper shoulder than standard .50 BMG ammunition. .510 DTC cases can be made by shortening and then fire-forming .50 BMG cases. The new round has almost identical ballistics, but because of the different dimensions, rifles chambered for the .50 BMG cannot safely fire the .510 DTC, and vice versa, and therefore do not fall under the same legal prohibitions. .510 DTC rifles, like .50 BMG rifles outside California, are simply standard modern rifles and can be purchased as such.

.510 Whisper
The .510 Whisper is a subsonic rifle cartridge developed by SSK Industries for use in suppressed rifles.[2] It fires a .51-caliber bullet weighing 750 gr (49 g) at roughly 1,050 ft/s (320 m/s).

.577 Nitro Express

 

The .577 Nitro Express is a large bore centerfire rifle cartridge designed for the purpose of hunting large game such as elephant. This cartridge is used almost exclusively in single shot and double express rifles for hunting in the Tropics or hot climates in general and is a cartridge associated with the Golden Age of African safaris and Indian shikars.

.577 Snider

 

The .577 Snider cartridge was a British black powder metallic cartridge, which fired a 14.7-millimetre (0.577 in), 31-gram (480 gr) lead projectile, primarily used in the Snider–Enfield rifle.

 

Early .577 Snider cartridges were made from paper, with a metallic base and primer, but later commercial cartridges were made from drawn brass, much like modern small arms ammunition. The .577 Snider cartridge was eventually replaced in service by the .577/450 Martini–Henry cartridge in the 1870s. The .577 Snider cartridge is considered by most commentators to be obsolete, with large scale commercial production having ceased in the 1930s. However, as of 2012, cases, bullets and cartridges as well as others of the .577 family are available from Tenbury Guns Limited in the United Kingdom. New brass can be formed from a 24 gauge hull and reloading dies are available from Lee. As of 2015, Kynamco in the United Kingdom and Bertram in Australia are also producing ready-made brass.[citation needed]

.577 Tyrannosaur (.577 T-Rex)

 

The .577 Tyrannosaur or .577 T-Rex (14.9×76mm) is a very large and extremely powerful rifle cartridge developed by A-Square in 1993 for professional guides who escort clients hunting dangerous game. The cartridge is designed for use in “stopping rifles”: A rifle intended to stop the charge of dangerous game. The 577 contains a .585-inch (14.9 mm) diameter 750-grain (49 g) Monolithic Solid Projectile which when fired moves at 2,460 ft/s (750 m/s) producing 10,180 foot-pounds force (13,800 J) of muzzle energy.[1] The production model from A-square is based on their Hannibal rifle.

.577/450 Martini-Henry

 

The .577/450 Martini–Henry was a black powder, centrefire round used by the British and British Empire militaries prior to the adoption of the .303 calibre cartridge used in the Lee–Metford, Martini–Enfield, and Lee–Enfield series of rifles alongside the Nepalese Bira gun.[1] This cartridge is also sometimes known as 11.43×60R (61R).[2]

.577/.500 Magnum Nitro Express

 

The .577/500 3⅛-inch Nitro Express is a British centerfire fire rifle cartridge.

.585 Nyati

The .585 Nyati (14.9×71mm) is a shoulder-fired rifle cartridge. Nyati (n-ya-te) means Cape Buffalo in many African languages such as Swahili. The .585 Nyati can generate 10,000 lb·ft (13,600 N·m) of muzzle energy. This places it at or near the top of the list for most powerful cartridges that can be chambered in a rifle that can still be carried afield.

.600 Nitro Express

 

The .600 Nitro Express (15.7×76mmR) is a rifle cartridge in the Nitro Express series which was introduced in 1903 by W.J. Jeffery & Co. It is the second largest calibre in the Nitro Express line, exceeded only by Holland & Holland’s .700 Nitro Express round.

.600 Overkill

The .600 Overkill cartridge is a hunting cartridge designed to fit the CZ-550 action, by American Hunting Rifles.

.700 Nitro Express

 

The .700 Nitro Express (17.8×89mmR) is a big game rifle cartridge made by Holland & Holland, London, England. It was developed in 1988 by Jim Bell and William Feldstein and built by H&H. Feldstein had tried unsuccessfully to get H&H to build a .600 Nitro Express for him, but they had already ceased production. However, when Bell and Feldstein produced the entirely new .700 Nitro Express cartridge, they were able to attract the interest of H&H, which was looking for a new big-bore cartridge. After production began, the backlog of orders was so great that it continued to 2007 and H&H restarted the production of .600 Nitro Express guns.[2]

.70-150 Winchester

The .70-150 Winchester is a hypothetical American centerfire rifle cartridge.

 

Appearing on cartridge boards of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1888, it may have been nothing more than a display novelty based on a brass 12-gauge shotshell (rather than the paper cases common at the time, or plastic frequently seen today), shortened and necked-down slightly.[1] Only one rifle was ever chambered for it, and it was never offered commercially.[2]

 

.950 JDJ

 

The .950 JDJ is a powerful large caliber rifle cartridge developed by American gunsmith and weapon designer J. D. Jones of SSK Industries.

Metric

Smaller than 6mm

4.6x30mm

 

 

The HK 4.6×30mm cartridge is a type of ammunition primarily used in the Heckler & Koch MP7 Personal Defense Weapon (PDW). It is designed to minimize weight and recoil while increasing penetration of body armor. It features a bottlenecked case and a pointed, steel-core, brass-jacketed bullet.

4.85x49mm

 

The 4.85×49mm is an experimental intermediate firearm cartridge made by the United Kingdom for the Individual Weapon project, which became the SA80 series of small arms.

4.92x34mm  

 

5.45x39mm

 

The 5.45×39mm cartridge is a rimless bottlenecked Intermediate cartridge. It was introduced into service in 1974 by the Soviet Union for use with the new AK-74 assault rifle. The 5.45×39mm gradually supplemented, then largely replaced the 7.62×39mm cartridge in Soviet and Warsaw Pact service as their primary military service rifle cartridge.

5.56×30mm MINSAS

 

The 5.56×30mm MINSAS is an ammunition manufactured by the Ordnance Factories Board for close quarter battle use.[1] OFB claims that its penetration rate is better than 9mm caliber.[2]

 

It’s currently chambered in the Modern Sub Machine Carbine and Amogh carbine.[3]

5.56x45mm NATO

 

The 5.56×45mm NATO (official NATO nomenclature 5.56 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge family developed in Belgium by FN Herstal.[4] It consists of the SS109, SS110, and SS111 cartridges. Under STANAG 4172, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries.[5] It is derived from, but is not identical to, the .223 Remington cartridge.

5.6x50mm Magnum

 

The 5.6×50mm Magnum (designated as the 5,6 × 50 Mag. by the C.I.P.[2]) is a centerfire, rimless, bottlenecked rifle cartridge that was developed in 1970 by Günter Frères of the Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM).

5.6x50mm R Magnum

5.6 x 52R (.22 Savage Hi-Power)

 

The 5.6×52mmR cartridge was created by Charles Newton and produced by Savage Arms in 1912. It is also known as the .22 Savage High-Power and .22 “Imp”, and is based upon the .25-35 Winchester cartridge necked down to accept a .227in/.228in diameter bullet. Its original loading was a 70 grain soft point bullet with a velocity of around 2700–2800 feet per second depending on the rifle.

5.6x57mm

 

The 5.6×57mm cartridge was created by RWS in Germany for hunting small deer such as roe deer, and for chamois. The calibre has a significant following among European sportsmen, and most European mass production riflemakers chamber several models of rifle for this cartridge. During the 1970-1990 period this cartridge was widely and successfully used in the Republic of Ireland for deer shooting, since security considerations at a period of Provisional Irish Republican Army violence had led to a ban on the civilian ownership of calibres larger than .224in. Some British small deer specialist hunters use the 5.6×57mm with great success on roe deer, muntjac and Chinese water deer.

 

With a factory-load velocity of 3,500 ft/s (1,100 m/s) with a 74-grain, cone-pointed bullet, it is approximately 100 ft/s (30 m/s) faster than the .220 Swift cartridge firing a bullet of equivalent weight. The larger case capacity means that handloaders can produce 50-grain loads that, with velocities in excess of 4,100 ft/s (1,200 m/s), will outpace anything that can safely be achieved by the Swift. The .223 Winchester Super Short Magnum is a 21st-century cartridge that is comparable to the 5.6×57mm. There are no dimensional or ballistic differences between the 5.6×57mm round and the 5.6×57mmR round, other than that the latter is rimmed.

 

The 5.6×57mm cartridge case has a distinctively thick case wall, and this causes significant problems when handloading, owing to the force that needs to be used through the press when re-sizing the case neck. It has been suggested that this unusual neck thickness is the result of the use of .22 rimfire chamber adapters in centrefire rifles chambered for this cartridge.

5.6x57mm R

 

 

The 5.6×57mmR cartridge was created by Rheinisch-Westfälische Sprengstoffwerke (RWS) in Germany for hunting small deer. There are no dimensional or ballistic differences between the 5.6×57mmR round and the 5.6×57mm round (q.v.) other than that the former is rimmed.

5.6 x 61 SE (5.6 x 61 Vom Hofe Super Express)

5.6 x 61 R SE (5.6 x 61 R Vom Hofe Super Express)

MMJ 5.7mm

5.7x28mm

 

The FN 5.7×28mm is a small-caliber, high-velocity cartridge designed and manufactured by FN Herstal in Belgium.[7] It is a bottlenecked centerfire cartridge that is somewhat similar to the .22 Hornet or .22 K-Hornet.[7] Unlike many new cartridges, it has no parent case; the complete package was developed from scratch by FN. The 5.7×28mm was developed in conjunction with the FN P90 personal defense weapon (PDW) and FN Five-seven pistol, in response to NATO requests for a replacement for the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge.[10][11]

 

In 2002 and 2003, NATO conducted a series of tests with the intention of standardizing a PDW cartridge as a replacement for the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge.[11] The tests compared the relative merits of the 5.7×28mm cartridge and the 4.6×30mm cartridge, which was created by Heckler & Koch as a competitor to the 5.7×28mm.[11] The NATO group subsequently recommended the 5.7×28mm cartridge, citing superior performance in testing, but the German delegation objected and the standardization process was indefinitely halted.[11]

 

By 2006, FN’s 5.7×28mm firearms—the P90 personal defense weapon and Five-seven pistol—were in service with military and police forces in over 40 nations throughout the world.[12] In the United States, 5.7×28mm firearms are currently used by numerous law enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service.[13][14]

 

In addition to being used in the FN P90 and FN Five-seven firearms, the 5.7×28mm cartridge has subsequently been used in a number of other weapons, such as the AR-57 and FN PS90 carbines.[15][16] Excel Arms has developed four firearms chambered in 5.7×28mm, and MasterPiece Arms offers three different firearms in 5.7×28mm.[17][18] The 5.7×28mm cartridge itself is produced in a number of varieties, two of which—the SS195LF and SS197SR—are currently offered by FN to civilian shooters.[15]

5.8x42mm DBP87

The 5.8×42mm / DBP87 (“Dàn (弹) Bùqiāng (步枪) Pŭtòng (普通), 1987”; literally “Standard Rifle Cartridge, 1987”) is a military a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge developed in the People’s Republic of China. There is limited information on this cartridge, although the People’s Liberation Army says that it is superior to the 5.56×45mm NATO and 5.45×39mm Soviet cartridges. Another variant called the DBP88 “heavy round” was designed specifically for squad automatic weapons and designated marksman rifles. The 5.8×42mm “heavy round” cartridge has the same dimensions as the standard 5.8×42mm cartridge, but utilizes a longer streamlined bullet with a heavy steel core for increased performance at extended ranges and penetration. As of 2010 all 5.8×42mm cartridge variants are gradually succeeded by the DBP10 variant.

6mm – 7mm

6 x 35 mm

6mm Lee Navy

 

The 6mm Lee Navy (6×60mmSR), also known as the 6mm U.S.N.[1] or .236 Navy,[2] is an obsolete American rifle cartridge.[3] It was the service cartridge of the United States Navy and Marine Corps from 1895 (replacing the .45-70 Government round) to 1899, when it was replaced by the .30-40 Krag. It was the first small-bore high-velocity smokeless powder cartridge to be adopted by either service.[1]

6mmAR

 

The 6mm AR is a centerfire wildcat cartridge initially designed by Robert Whitley[1] for long-range performance in an AR-15 rifle.

6 mm BR Remington

 

The 6mm BR is a centerfire cartridge created for benchrest shooting. The cartridge is also known as the 6mm Bench Rest or simply 6 BR, and has also developed a following among varmint hunters because of its efficiency.[2] There are two basic variants of very similar dimensions, known as the 6mm BR Remington and the 6mm Norma BR.

6 mm Musgrave

 

 

The 6mm Musgrave was the brain child of Ben Musgrave and introduced by Musgrave Rifles in 1955 and can be described as a classic Africa cartridge. It is based on necking down the .303 British with the original intent of it being a Springbok calibre for hunting on open plains in South Africa’s Karoo, Kalahari and Namakwaland. It is also well suited for other smaller antelope where longer shots have to be taken. Although not designed for bushveld conditions, the calibre can be downloaded to drive 100 grainers at 2500 feet per second and makes a very good cartridge for Impala and Reedbuck.

 

Like the .243 Winchester it has a fast rifle twist of 1-10 inches, however if 105 grain bullets are used it is recommended that a 1-9 or even faster twist is used to stabilise the bullets.

 

PMP (Pretoria Metal Pressings) is one of the very few ammunition manufacturers of 6mm Musgrave ammunition, but a lot of South African distributors have the ammunition in stock.

 

Dies for handloading are available from RCBS and Lee Precision.

 

Most manufactures of bullets (like Hornady, Nosler, Barnes, etc.) manufacture 6mm (.243″) bullets that are suitable for this chambering.

6mm TCU

 

 

The Thompson/Center Ugalde, or TCU family of wildcat cartridges, was developed by Wes Ugalde of Fallon, Nevada, by necking up .223 Remington brass to accept larger bullets. The cartridges were developed for the Thompson Center Arms Contender single shot pistol, and are widely used in handgun metallic silhouette competition and handgun hunting.[1]

6 mm PPC

 

The 6mm PPC (Palmisano & Pindel Cartridge), or 6 PPC as it is more often called, is a centerfire rifle cartridge used almost exclusively for benchrest shooting.[2] At distances out to 300 yards, it is one of the most accurate cartridges available.[3][4] This cartridge’s accuracy is produced by a combination of its stout posture, being only 1.23 inches (31 mm) long, and aggressive shoulder angle of 30 degrees compared to a 30-06’s 17 degrees.[5] Today it is commonly used for railgun shooting matches and has been since the 1980s

6mm-284

6x45mm A.K.A. (6mm-223 Remington)

6x47mm A.K.A. (6mm-222 Rem. Magnum)

6 mm Remington (.244 Remington)

 

The 6mm Remington rifle cartridge, originally introduced in 1955 by Remington Arms Company as the .244 Remington, is based on a necked down .257 Roberts cartridge using a .24/6mm bullet. Known for a combination of high velocity, long range, and accuracy, it is suitable as a dual use hunting cartridge for both varmints and medium-sized big game. When used in the less common earlier slow twist barrels, it offers exceptional range for varmint applications. While not as commercially popular today as it’s close cousin and competitor, the .243 Winchester, the 6mm Remington enjoys a slightly ballistic advantage and continues to be popular with handloaders and custom rifle builders.

6mm-250 A.K.A. (6mm International) Walker Version

6.5mm TCU

 

 

The Thompson/Center Ugalde, or TCU family of wildcat cartridges, was developed by Wes Ugalde of Fallon, Nevada, by necking up .223 Remington brass to accept larger bullets. The cartridges were developed for the Thompson Center Arms Contender single shot pistol, and are widely used in handgun metallic silhouette competition and handgun hunting.[1]

6.5 Creedmoor

 

The 6.5mm Creedmoor, also called the 6.5 Creedmoor or 6.5 CM for short, is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced by Hornady in 2007[6] as a modification of the .30 TC,[7] which was based on the .308 Winchester. It was designed specifically for rifle target shooting,[6] although it is also achieving success in game hunting.[7] Bullet for bullet, the 6.5mm Creedmoor achieves a slower muzzle velocity than longer cartridges such as the 6.5-284 Norma or magnum cartridges such as the 6.5mm Remington Magnum. However, due to its 2.825 inches (71.8 mm) overall length, it is capable of being chambered in short-action bolt action rifles and AR-10 semi-automatic rifles.

6.5 mm Grendel

 

The 6.5mm Grendel (6.5×39mm) is an intermediate cartridge designed by Arne Brennan, Bill Alexander, and Janne Pohjoispää as a low recoil, high accuracy, 200–800 yard cartridge specifically for the AR-15. It is an improved variation of the 6.5mm PPC.[4] Since its introduction, it has proven to be a versatile design and is now expanding out into other firearms including bolt-action rifles and the Kalashnikov system.[5]

 

The name “6.5mm Grendel” was a trademark owned by Alexander Arms until it was legally released to allow the cartridge to become SAAMI standardized.[6][7]

6.5 mm Remington Magnum

 

 

The 6.5mm Remington Magnum is a .264 caliber (6.7 mm) belted bottlenecked cartridge introduced in 1966.[1][2] The cartridge is based on a necked down .350 Remington Magnum which on turn is based on a shortened, necked down, blown out .375 H&H Magnum case.[3] The cartridge was one of the first short magnum cartridges.

6.5-06 A-Square

 

 

The 6.5-06 A-Square is a centerfire rifle cartridge that originated as a wildcat, based on the popular .30-06 Springfield. A-Square standardized the dimensions of the cartridge and submitted them to SAAMI in 1997.

6.5mm/06 A.K.A. 256/06

6.5-284 Norma

 

The 6.5-284 Norma originated as a wildcat cartridge based on the .284 Winchester cartridge necked down to 6.5 mm.

6mm/30-30 Improved

6.5x42mm Multi-Purpose Cartride (SSK Industries)

6.5x47mm Lapua
6.5×47mm Lapua (or 6.5×47mm) is a rifle cartridge that was developed specifically for 300–1000 meter competition by ammunition maker Nammo Lapua and the Swiss rifle manufacturer Grünig & Elmiger AG in 2005.[1]

6.5x50mm Arisaka

 

The 6.5×50mm Semi-Rimmed (6.5×50mmSR) Japanese cartridge, currently manufactured under the designation 6.5mm Jap, was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army in 1897, along with the Type 30 Arisaka infantry rifle and carbine. The new rifle and cartridge replaced the 8×52mm Murata round used in the Type 22 Murata Rifle. In 1902 the Imperial Japanese Navy chambered its Type 35 rifle for the cartridge as well. In 1905, the round also came to be offered in the Type 38 Arisaka infantry rifle and carbine, both of which rendered the Type 30 obsolete in Imperial Army service. Type 44 cavalry carbines, first adopted in 1911, were also chambered in 6.5×50mm.

6.5x52mm Mannlicher-Carcano

 

The 6.5×52mm Carcano, also known as the 6.5×52mm Parravicini–Carcano or 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano, is an Italian military 6.5 mm (.268 cal, actually 0.2675 inches) rimless bottle-necked rifle cartridge, developed from 1889 to 1891 and used in the Carcano 1891 rifle and many of its successors. A common synonym in American gun literature is “6.5mm Italian.” In American parlance, “Carcano” is frequently added to better distinguish it from the rimmed hunting cartridge 6.5×52mmR (U.S. version: .25-35 Winchester). Ballistically, its performance is very similar to that of the 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer.

6.5 x 52R

 

The .25-35 Winchester, or WCF (Winchester Center Fire) was introduced in 1895 by Winchester for the Winchester Model 1894 lever action rifle. The case was based on the .30-30 cartridge.

6.5x53mmR Mannlicher   

6.5x54mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

 

The 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer also known as 6.5×54 Mannlicher–Schönauer Greek is a 6.5 mm (.264″ cal.) rifle cartridge used in the Mannlicher–Schönauer rifle. 6.5 mm bullets are typically known for their high ballistic coefficients and sectional density, which gives them great stability in flight, resistance to wind deflection, and excellent penetration.

6.5x55mm (Also 6.5×55 Swedish Mauser, 6.5 x 55 Mauser)

 

The 6.5×55mm (designated as the 6.5×55 Swedish by the SAAMI[5] and 6,5 × 55 SE by the C.I.P.[6]) is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. Other, less common names are 6.5×55mm Swedish Mauser, 6.5×55mm Mauser and 6.5×55mm Krag. It was developed in 1891 for use in the new service rifles then under consideration by the United Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway.[7] The two nations had independent armies and consequently the normal procedure at the time was for their respective governments to use the same ammunition and then purchase small arms of their choice. Norway adopted the Krag–Jørgensen rifle, while Sweden adopted a Mauser rifle design.

 

The 6.5×55mm cartridge has a smaller bullet diameter and lower free recoil than other full-power service rifle cartridges like the .30-06 Springfield and 7.92×57mm Mauser, but thanks in part to its relatively roomy case with an uncommon 12.2 mm (0.480 in) diameter bolt face which was designed for loading long, heavy 6.5 mm bullets, has proven more successful than other first-generation smokeless-powder military cartridges of similar caliber such as the 6×60mm US Navy, 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer, 6.5×53mmR Dutch Mannlicher, 6.5×52mm Carcano and 6.5×50mm Arisaka.

6.5x57mm Mauser

6.5x68mm (also known as the 6.5 x 68 RWS, 6.5 x 68 Schüler or the 6.5 x 68 Von Hofe Express)

 

 

The 6.5×68mm rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire rifle cartridge (also known as the 6.5×68mm RWS, 6.5×68mm Schüler, or the 6.5×68mm Von Hofe Express) and its sister cartridge the 8×68mm S were developed in the 1930s by August Schüler from the August Schüler Waffenfabrik, Suhl, Germany as magnum hunting cartridges that would just fit and function in standard-sized Mauser 98 bolt-action rifles. This is one of the early examples where a completely new rifle cartridge (the 6.5×68mm and 8×68mm S have no other cartridge as parent case) was developed by a gunsmith to fit a specific popular and widespread type of rifle.

6.8 mm Remington SPC

The 6.8 mm Remington Special Purpose Cartridge (aka 6.8 SPC, 6.8 SPC II & 6.8×43mm) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge that was developed by Remington Arms in collaboration with members of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, United States Special Operations Command[5] to possibly replace the 5.56 NATO cartridge in a Short Barreled Rifle(SBR)/Carbine.

 

Based upon the .30 Remington cartridge,[6] it is midway between the 5.56×45mm NATO and 7.62×51mm NATO in bore diameter and muzzle energy. It uses the same diameter bullet (not usually the same weight) as the venerable .270 Winchester hunting cartridge.

7mm – 8mm
7mm Shooting Times Easterner (7mm STE)

7mm International Rimmed

 

7mm TCU A.K.A. (25 Ugalde)

7 mm BR Remington

 

The 7mm BR Remington, commonly called the 7mm BR or the 7mm Benchrest Remington in long form, was a cartridge developed by Remington for the Remington XP-100 single-shot bolt-action handgun. The cartridge was developed for the Unlimited Class in the sport of Metallic silhouette shooting. Later it was introduced in the Remington Model XB-40 single-shot bolt-action rifle, which was specifically designed for the benchrest shooting community.[1]

 

The 7mm BR is based on previous Remington benchrest cartridges 6mm BR Remington and the .22 BR Remington cartridges. These cartridges in turn trace their origin to .308 Winchester via the .308×1.5-inch Barnes cartridge. The 7mm BR was designed by merely necking up the pre-existing 6mm BR Remington to accept a .28 caliber (7 mm) bullet. The cartridge is capable of developing 2,200 ft/s (670 m/s) with a 139 gr (9.0 g) bullet or 2,100 ft/s (640 m/s) with a 154 gr (10.0 g) bullet in a 15 in (380 mm) barrel.[1]

 

As a hunting cartridge it is adequate for smaller deer species and ranges under 150 yd (140 m). With lighter bullets, this cartridge makes an excellent varmint or predator cartridge. The 7mm BR Remington, however, was conceived as a competitive handgun cartridge for Metallic Shooting.[1] It has enough energy and momentum to knock down targets out to 200 yd (180 m) and has had some success in that particular shooting discipline. Later it was also adopted in Benchrest shooting by Remington who introduced the X-40 rifle in that chambering.

 

At one time Remington produced ammunition and cases for this cartridge. They continued to supply the 7mm BR Remington case though to the early 1990s. Today the cartridge is considered obsolete and no one produces loaded ammunition and Remington no longer manufactures firearms chambered for this cartridge.

7mm IHMSA

 

7 mm Dakota

7 mm Gibbs

7 mm Remington Magnum

 

The 7mm Remington Magnum rifle cartridge was introduced as a commercially available round in 1962,[2] along with the new Remington Model 700 bolt-action rifle. It is a member of the belted magnum family that is directly derived from the venerable .375 H&H Magnum.[3][full citation needed] The original purpose of the belted magnum concept taken from the .300 H&H Magnum and .375 H&H Magnum, was to provide precise headspace control, since the sloping shoulders, while easing cartridge extraction, were unsuitable for this purpose. Improved cartridge extraction reliability is desirable while hunting dangerous game, which would be of concern when needing a fast follow up shot. The 7mm Remington Magnum is based on the commercial Winchester .264 Winchester Magnum, .338 Winchester Magnum, and .458 Winchester Magnum, which were based on the same belted .300 H&H Magnum and .375 H&H Magnum cases, trimmed to nearly the same length as the .270 Weatherby Magnum.[3]

 

On its introduction, the 7mm Remington Magnum substantially usurped the market share held by the .264 Winchester Magnum, which went into sharp decline in popularity and sales after 1962.[4] Remington has recently[when?] offered Managed Recoil ammunition for achieving reduced recoil when shooting and for generating less meat damage when hunting smaller game.

7 mm RSAUM (Remington Short-Action Ultra Mag)

7 mm Remington Ultra Magnum

 

The 7mm RUM was created using the .404 Jeffery case which was also used to develop the .375 RUM .300 RUM, and .338 RUM. By necking down the .300 RUM to suit the .284 or 7mm projectile, Remington produced a non-belted case with a head diameter that is somewhat larger than belt diameter of original belted numbers. The resulting case has significantly more capacity than any conventional belted magnum. Compared to the 7mm Remington Magnum, top 7mm RUM loads deliver 25% more energy at 300 yards.[citation needed] Such performance demands a price and in this case, that is a large muzzle blast, sharp recoil and short barrel life.[1]

 

The 7mm Ultra Magnum boasts the largest case of any commercial 7mm cartridge.

7 mm STE (Shooting Times Easterner)

7 mm STW (Shooting Times Westerner)

 

 

The 7mm Shooting Times Westerner, sometimes referred to as the 7mm STW began as a wildcat rifle cartridge developed by Layne Simpson in 1979.[2] It is an 8mm Remington Magnum case that has been “necked down” (narrowing the case opening) by 1 mm to accept 7 mm (.284 in) bullets. This cartridge is named after the magazine Shooting Times where Layne Simpson is a regular contributor.

7 mm Weatherby Magnum

 

The 7 mm Weatherby Magnum is a powerful (magnum) 7 mm rifle cartridge offered by the Weatherby firearms company in their Mark V rifles. The cartridge was one of the first cartridges offered by the Weatherby company.[1]

 

It was developed in the 1940s by Roy Weatherby. The 7 mm Weatherby Magnum did not get a lot of exposure until the early part of the 1950s when the Weatherby rifles became more available. It is a great cartridge for a one-rifle hunter that shoots long distances. It has taken game of all sizes around the world.

7 mm WSM (Winchester Short Magnum)
Winchester Short Magnum, or WSM, refers to a family of rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire short magnum cartridges developed in the early 2000s by the U.S. Repeating Arms Company, the maker of Winchester rifles and one of the oldest firearms manufacturers in the United States. All of the WSM cartridges are based on the .404 Jeffery non-belted magnum cartridge which is shortened to fit a short rifle action (such as a .308 Winchester).

 

U.S. Repeating Arms Company used the same concept and the same base case in creating its even shorter Winchester Super Short Magnum cartridges, three of which were introduced in 2003 and 2004.

7mm-06 Mashburn

7mm-06

7 mm-08 Remington

 

The 7mm-08 Remington is a rifle cartridge that is almost a direct copy of a wildcat cartridge developed around 1958 known as the 7mm/308. As these names would suggest, it is the .308 Winchester case necked down to accept 7 mm (.284) bullets with a small increase in case length. Of cartridges based upon the .308, it is the second most popular behind only the .243 Winchester. However, the .308 is more popular than both.[1] In 1980, the Remington Arms company popularized the cartridge by applying its own name and offering it as a chambering for their Model 788 and Model 700 rifles.

7 mm-300 Weatherby Magnum

7-30 Waters

 

 

The 7-30 Waters cartridge was originally a wildcat cartridge developed by author Ken Waters in 1976 to give better performance to lever-action rifle shooters than the parent .30-30 Winchester cartridge, by providing a higher velocity and flatter trajectory with a smaller, lighter bullet. By 1984, Winchester introduced a Model 94 rifle chambered for the 7-30 Waters, establishing it as a commercial cartridge. In 1986, Thompson/Center began chambering 10-inch, 14-inch, and 20-inch Contender barrels for the cartridge.[1]

7.2 SLEC (7.2 SPECIAL LAW ENFORCEMENT CARTRIDGE)

7.21 Firebird

7.21 Tomahawk

7.44mm

 

 

 

 

7x33mm Sako

 

The 7×33mm Sako cartridge was created in Finland in 1942 as a small game cartridge for animals such as the Capercaillie and Black Grouse. It is based on a 9×19mm Parabellum case that has been lengthened and necked down to accept a 7.21mm bullet. The cartridge overall length is 44.30mm with a case length of 33.30mm and a base diameter of 10mm. The bottleneck bends at 26.50 mm (dia 9.50 mm) and straightens at 29.12 mm (dia 7.80mm). The Bertram company of Australia makes brass for it. Sako offers two loadings, a 78gr (5.1g) FMJ and a 78gr soft nose.[1]

 

Rifles chambered in this caliber include the Sako Models L42 and L46.

7×54mm Finnish

 

The 7×54mm Finnish is a rifle cartridge which was designed by Lapua as a moose hunting cartridge.[1] It was loaded by two factories, Sako and Lapua in Finland from about 1944 until 1974.[1] It is a 6.5×55mm SE necked up to take a 7mm (.285) bullet. It may be loaded with modified 6.5×55mm SE dies drilled to fit 8mm neck diameter. It was usually loaded with a lightweight bullet.

 

Dimensions were measured from a cartridge loaded by Lapua and from (if two measurements) a case that had been shot with an modified Arisaka. Because caliber is a wildcat, those can vary greatly. Rim diameter of the 6.5×55mm is 0.480″ (12.20 mm).[2]

7×54mm Fournier

 

Created by the gunsmith Jean Fournier, the 7x54mm Fournier is basically the 7.5x54mm French necked down to 7 mm. The cartridge was designed to be used with the Mas Fournier hunting rifle, which was itself a modification of the MAS-36 rifle.

 

Since the retirement and death of Jean Fournier, the fabrication of this cartridge has stopped. However, if some original ammos are still available for sale (mainly as collector), reloading dies and tables have been released since then.

7x57mm Mauser (.275 Rigby)

 

The 7×57mm cartridge, also known as the 7mm Mauser, 7×57mm Mauser, 7mm Spanish Mauser in the USA and .275 Rigby in the United Kingdom is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. It was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company in 1892 and adopted as a military cartridge by Spain in 1893.[2] It was subsequently adopted by several other countries as the standard military cartridge. It is recognised as a milestone in modern cartridge design, and although now obsolete as a military cartridge, it remains in widespread international use as a sporting round. The 7×57mm has been described as “a ballistician’s delight”.[citation needed] Many sporting rifles in this calibre were made by British riflemakers, among whom John Rigby was prominent; and, catering for the British preference for calibres to be designated in inches, Rigby called this chambering the .275 bore after the measurement of a 7 mm rifle’s bore across the lands.[2]

7x61mm Sharpe & Hart

 

 

The 7x61mm Sharpe & Hart Magnum belted cartridge (7mm S&H Super) was developed by Philip B. Sharpe and Richard (Dick) Hart in the 1950s and based on the .300 H&H Magnum case. In 1953 Sharpe travelled to Scandinavia and the outcome of this trip was that Schultz & Larsen of Denmark chambered the cartridge in their bolt action rifles. One example being the model 54J, which featured rear locking lugs and a fully enclosed bolt face. while Norma started to manufacture commercial ammunition according to the designers specifications. But today the cartridge requires hand-loading. However hand-loaders have a variety of bullets to choose from, and Hornady lists load data for the cartridge. Brass is still available, or can be fire-formed from 7mm Remington Magnum cases.

7x64mm Brenneke

 

The 7×64mm (also unofficially known as the 7×64mm Brenneke, though its designer’s name officially never was added as a part of this cartridge name) is a rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed for hunting. As is customary in European cartridges the 7 denotes the 7 mm bullet caliber and the 64 denotes the 64 mm (2.5 in) case length. The 7×64mm is a popular hunting cartridge in Central Europe and can, due to its 11.95 mm (0.470 in) case head diameter and 84 mm (3.3 in) overall length, easily be chambered in Mauser 98 bolt action rifles that were then standard issue in the German military.

7x65mm R Brenneke

7x66mm Super Express vom Hofe

7×72 Rimmed

7x75mm R Super Express vom Hofe

7.35x51mm Carcano

 

The 7.35×51mm Carcano is an Italian rifle cartridge and a now obsolete caliber designed to replace the 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano in the Carcano rifles of the Italian military. The 7.35 also had the advantage of using Spitzer-style bullets to achieve higher velocity.

7.5x55mm Schmidt Rubin

 

The 7.5×55mm Swiss or GP 11 (or unofficially 7.5×55mm Schmidt–Rubin) is a cartridge developed for the Swiss Army by Lt. Col. Eduard Rubin for rifles based on Rudolf Schmidt’s action design. The ammunition used by the Schmidt–Rubin Model 1889 rifle was one of the first to use 7.5 mm copper-jacketed rounds similar to those used today. The GP90 7.5×53.5mm round designed by Colonel Rubin was revolutionary in that the most popular military calibres used in Europe at the time were around 10 to 14 mm as opposed to 7.5 mm of the Schmidt–Rubin ammunition.

7.5x57mm MAS mod. 1924 7.5x54mm MAS mod. 1929

The 7.5×54mm French or 7.5 French (designated as the 7,5 × 54 MAS by the C.I.P.[1]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. It was developed by France as an update to the 7.5×57mm MAS mod. 1924 cartridge. It replaced the obsolete 8×50mmR Lebel round used during World War I.

 

The 7.5×54mm French chamber has an uncommon 12.39 mm (0.488 in) breech diameter and is ballistically comparable to the 7.62×51mm NATO/.308 Winchester round.[1] The 7.5 French cartridge is somewhat similar in appearance to the slightly longer and thicker 7.5×55mm Swiss GP11 round but users should never try to interchange the two rounds.

7.62 mm caliber

 

7.62 mm caliber is a nominal caliber used for a number of different cartridges. Historically, this class of cartridge was commonly known as .30 caliber, the Imperial unit equivalent, and was most commonly used for indicating a class of full power military main battle rifle (MBR) cartridges. The measurement equals 0.30 inches or 3 decimal lines, written .3″ and read as Three-Line.[1]

 

7.62 mm refers to the internal diameter of the barrel at the lands (the raised helical ridges in rifled gun barrels). The actual bullet caliber is normally 7.82 mm (.308 in), although Soviet weapons commonly use a 7.91 mm (.311 in) bullet, as do older British (.303 British) and Japanese cartridges.

7.62x25mm Tokarev

 

The 7.62×25mm Tokarev cartridge (designated as the 7,62 × 25 Tokarev by the C.I.P.[5]) is a Russian rimless bottlenecked pistol cartridge widely used in former Soviet satellite states, China and Pakistan among other countries. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9×18mm Makarov in Russian service.[6]

7.62x38mmR

 

7.62×38mmR (also known as 7.62 mm Nagant and Cartridge, Type R) is a unique ammunition cartridge designed for use in the Russian Nagant M1895 revolver.

 

A small number of experimental submachine guns (e.g., Tokarev 1927), designed by Fedor Tokarev, were also produced in a 7.62 mm Nagant chambering.[1] None, however, were accepted into Soviet service.[2][3]

7.62×35mm

 

300 AAC Blackout, SAAMI short name 300 BLK, also known as 7.62×35mm is a rifle cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. Its purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacity. Care should be taken not to use 300 BLK ammunition in a rifle chambered for .223/5.56 or 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical.[1]

7.62x39mm

 

The 7.62×39mm (aka 7.62 Soviet) round is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge of Soviet origin that was designed during World War II. Due to the worldwide proliferation of RPD and RPK light machine guns and SKS and AK-47 pattern rifles, the cartridge is used by both militaries and civilians alike. 7.62×39mm ammunition is purportedly tested to function well in temperatures ranging from −50 to 50 °C (−58 to 122 °F) cementing its usefulness in cold polar or hot desert conditions.

 

The 7.62×39mm cartridge was influenced by a variety of foreign developments, including the German Mkb 42(H) and the U.S. M1 carbine.[3]

 

Shortly after World War II, the world’s most widespread military-pattern rifle was designed for this cartridge: the AK-47. The cartridge remained the Soviet standard until the 1970s. It was largely replaced in Russian service by the 5.45×39mm cartridge, which is used by the current-issue AK-74M service rifle and its variants. In the 21st century the 7.62×39mm remains a common service rifle chambering, including for newly developed rifles.

 

 

7.62×40 Wilson Tactical

 

The 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical (7.62×40mm WT) is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced in 2011 by Wilson Combat. The goal was to produce an accurate, low-recoil .30-caliber hunting cartridge that could be used in an AR-15-type rifle using as many standard components as possible.

7.62x45mm vz. 52

 

The 7.62×45mm (designated as the 7,62 × 45 by the C.I.P.)[2] is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge developed in Czechoslovakia. It is fired by the Czech vz. 52 rifle, Vz. 52 machine gun and ZB-530 light machine gun. The round was later dropped from use when the Czech converted to the standard Warsaw Pact round, the 7.62×39mm (fired by vz. 52/57 rifle and vz. 52/57 light machine gun). Its muzzle velocity and muzzle energy are slightly higher than that of the 7.62×39mm cartridge.

7.62×51mm NATO

 

300 AAC Blackout, SAAMI short name 300 BLK, also known as 7.62×35mm is a rifle cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. Its purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacity. Care should be taken not to use 300 BLK ammunition in a rifle chambered for .223/5.56 or 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical.[1]

7.62x53mm Rimmed

7.62 x 54R (rimmed) (7.62 Russian)

 

The 7.62×54mmR (aka 7.62 Russian) is a rimmed rifle cartridge developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the bolt-action Mosin–Nagant rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet period to the present day. The cartridge remains one of the few standard-issue rimmed cartridges still in military use and has the longest service life of all military-issued cartridges in the world.[4]

 

The American Winchester Model 1895 was also chambered for this cartridge per a contract with the Russian government. The 7.62×54mmR is still in use by the Russian military in the Dragunov and other sniper rifles, as well as some modern general-purpose machine guns like the PKM and Pecheneg machine gun. Originally, the round was designated as “Трехлинейный патрон образца 1891 года” – (Three-line cartridge model of 1891). It then became widely known under the designation “7,62мм винтовочный патрон” (7.62mm rifle cartridge). The round has erroneously come to be known as the “7.62mm Russian” (and is still often referred to as such colloquially), but, according to standards, the “R” in designation (7.62×54mmR) stands for Rimmed, in line with standard C.I.P. designations. The name is sometimes confused with the “7.62 Soviet” round, which refers to the rimless 7.62×39mm cartridge used in the SKS and AK-based (AK-47, AK-15, AEK-973) rifles.

7.63x25mm Mauser

 

The 7.63×25mm Mauser (.30 Mauser Automatic) round was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case.[1] It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in Soviet and Eastern Bloc weapons.

7.65x22mm Parabellum

 

The 7.65×21mm Parabellum (designated as the 7,65 Parabellum by the C.I.P.[2] and also known as .30 Luger and 7.65mm Luger) is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for their new Pistol Parabellum. The primary designers were firearms designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65×25mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65x53mm Argentine (7.65x53mm Mauser)

 

The 7.65×53mm Mauser (designated as the 7,65 × 53 Arg. by the C.I.P.)[2] is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge developed for use in the Mauser Model 1889 rifle by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company. It is also known as 7.65×53mm Argentine, 7.65×53mm Argentine rimless, 7.65mm Argentine, 7.65×53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65mm Belgian (in the United States) and 7.65×53mm Mauser (in Belgium).

 

The 7.65×53mmR is a rimmed variant of the 7.65×53mm Mauser cartridge.[citation needed] Ballistically it is comparable to the also-rimmed .303 British cartridge.[citation needed]

7.65x53mmR

7.63x54mm Greek Mannlicher-Schoenauer

7.7x58mm Arisaka

 

The 7.7×58mm Arisaka cartridge, Type 99 rimless 7.7 mm or 7.7mm Japanese was a rifle cartridge which was used in the Imperial Japanese Army’s Arisaka Type 99 Rifle and machine guns, and was the standard light cartridge for the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service, such as the Type 89. The Imperial Japanese Navy (and her Air Service) never shared weapons or ammunition with the Army, instead adopting the 7.7x56mmR, a direct copy of the .303 British round. The cartridge was designed to replace the aging 6.5×50mm Arisaka cartridge after seeing the effectiveness of the 8×57 IS heavy machine gun in action in China during 1937.[2] Due to lack of materials the plan to phase out the 6.5 mm Arisaka cartridge by the end of the war was not completed.

7.8 SLEC (( 7.8 SPECIAL LAW ENFORCEMENT CARTRIDGE))

7.82 Patriot

7.82 Warbird

7.92x33mm Kurz

 

The 7.92×33mm Kurz (designated as the 7.92 x 33 kurz by the C.I.P.)[4][5][6][7][8] is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge developed in Nazi Germany prior to and during World War II. The ammunition is also referred to as 7.9mm Kurz (German: Kurz meaning short), 7.9 Kurz, or 7.9mmK, or 8×33 Polte. It was specifically intended for development of an automatic carbine (assault rifle). The round was developed as a compromise between the longer 7.92×57mm rifle and the 9×19mm Parabellum pistol rounds, and is known as an intermediate cartridge (German: Mittelpatrone).

7.92x36mm EPK

 

 

The 7.92×36mm EPK was an experimental rifle round intended for the Pyrkal light machine gun. The round is essentially a 6.5mm Mannlicher round necked up to chamber a 7.92 mm bullet.

7.92x57mm Mauser (8 mm Mauser or 8×57 JS)

 

The 7.92×57mm Mauser (designated as the 8mm Mauser or 8×57mm by the SAAMI [2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was adopted by the German Empire in 1903/1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.

8mm – 9mm

8 mm-06

 

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

8mm Mauser

 

The 7.92×57mm Mauser (designated as the 8mm Mauser or 8×57mm by the SAAMI [2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was adopted by the German Empire in 1903/1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.

8 mm Lebel or 8x50R Lebel

 

The 8×50mmR Lebel (8mm Lebel) (designated as the 8 × 51 R Lebel by the C.I.P.[1]) rifle cartridge was the first smokeless powder cartridge to be made and adopted by any country. It was introduced by France in 1886. Formed by necking down the 11mm Gras black powder cartridge, the smokeless 8 mm Lebel cartridge started a revolution in military rifle ammunition. Standard 8mm Lebel military ammunition was also the first rifle ammunition to feature a spitzer boat tail bullet (Balle D), which was adopted in 1898.[3] The long-range ballistic performance of the 8mm Lebel bullet itself was exceptional. For use in the magazine tube-fed early Lebel rifle, the 8mm case was designed to protect against accidental percussion inside the tube magazine by a circular groove around the primer cup which caught the tip of the following pointed bullet. However, the shape of its rimmed bottle-necked case, having been designed for the Lebel rifle’s tube magazine, also precluded truly efficient vertical stacking inside a vertical magazine. The bolt thrust of the 8mm Lebel is relatively high compared to many other service rounds used in the early 20th century. Although it was once revolutionary, the 8mm Lebel was declared obsolete after World War I and was soon after replaced with the 7.5×54mm French round.

8 mm Remington Magnum

 

The 8mm Remington Magnum belted rifle cartridge was introduced by Remington Arms Company in 1978 as a new chambering for the model 700 BDL rifle. The 8mm Remington Magnum’s parent case is the .375 H&H Magnum. It is a very long and powerful cartridge that cannot be used in standard length actions, such as those that accommodate the .30-06 Springfield.[3]

8x35mm

8x50mmR Mannlicher

 

The Austro-Hungarian 8×50mmR Mannlicher or 8×50mmR M93 is a cartridge dating back to the days of semi-smokeless powder.

8x56mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

8x56mmR Steyr or Hungarian

 

The 8×56mmR or 8×56mmR M30S (C.I.P. civil designation) cartridge was adopted in the year 1930 by Austria, in 1931 by the Kingdom of Hungary and in 1934 by the Kingdom of Bulgaria as a replacement for the 8×50mmR Mannlicher cartridge.

8x58mm RD (rimmed danish)

8x60mm S

 

The 8×60mm S (the S means it is intended for 8.2 mm (.323 in) groove diameter bullets) is an uncommon rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge of German origin, dating back to the interbellum period between World War I and World War II. As is customary in European cartridges the 8 denotes the 8 mm bullet caliber and the 60 denotes the 60 mm (2.362 in) case length. The 8×60mm S can, due to its 83.6 mm (3.291 in) overall length, easily be chambered in standard sized Mauser 98 bolt action rifles.

8x64mm S Brenneke

8x68mm S

 

 

The 8×64mm S (also unofficially known as the 8×64mm S Brenneke) (the S means it is intended for 8.2 mm (.323 in) groove diameter bullets) is a rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed as a military service round for the German Army who never issued it. As is customary in European cartridges the 8 denotes the 8 mm bullet caliber and the 64 denotes the 64 mm (2.52 in) case length.

 

The 8×64mm is a hunting cartridge in central Europe and can due to its 87.5 mm (3.445 in) maximal overall length fairly easily be chambered in standard sized military Mauser 98 bolt action rifles. In such military M98 bolt actions the magazine boxes, however, have to be adapted by a competent gunsmith to function properly with the 8×64mm S cartridge, since the M98 internal magazine boxes feature an internal magazine length of 84 mm (3.31 in).

9mm and larger

9x39mm

 

The 9×39mm is a Soviet / Russian rifle cartridge.[1]

9x45mm

9x53mm

 

 

The Soviet 9×53mmR rifle cartridge was designed for hunting in the USSR. It is a 7.62×54mmR necked up to accommodate a larger bullet.[5] Two bullet types are available:[6]

9x56mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

9x57mm Mauser

 

The 9×57mm Mauser is a cartridge based on the 7.92×57mm Mauser. It uses the identical 57 mm-long cartridge case, with the same shoulder angle, but necked up to accept a 9 mm-diameter bullet. Ballistically – but not dimensionally – it is indistinguishable from the 9×56mm Mannlicher–Schoenauer. It is currently regarded as a semi-obsolete calibre, although hand-loading keeps it alive.

9.3x57mm

 

9.3 x 57mm Mauser was created by necking up the 7.92 x 57mm Mauser cartridge. The 9.3×57mm (bullet diameter .365 in.), introduced in 1900, is closely related to the 9×57mm Mauser, even though some dimensions of the cartridge case are slightly different. The 9.3×57mm is still fairly popular among moose hunters in Scandinavia (among hunters in Sweden it is affectionately known as “potatiskastaren”, the spud gun, because of the slow and heavy bullet). Factory loaded ammunition with 232 grains (15.0 g) and 285 grains (18.5 g) bullets is available from Norma of Sweden. The 9.3×57mm Norma factory load with a 232 grains (15.0 g) bullet has a muzzle velocity of 2,362 feet per second (720 m/s) for 2,875 foot-pounds force (3,898 J) of energy, which makes it 10-20% more powerful than the 9×57mm.[1]

9.3x62mm

 

The 9.3×62mm (also known in the USA as the 9.3×62mm Mauser) is an ‘all-around firearms cartridge’ suitable for hunting larger species of animals in Africa, Europe, or North America. It was introduced by Otto Bock in 1905. At a typical 720.0 m/s (2,362 ft/s), its 286 grain standard load balances recoil and power for effective use at up to about 250m (275 yds). The CIP Maximum Average Pressure (MAP) for the 9.3×62mm is 390 MPa (56,500 PSI). [2]

 

The 9.3×62mm was developed around 1905 by Berlin gunmaker Otto Bock, who designed it to fit into the Model 1898 Mauser bolt-action rifle. [2] African hunters and settlers often chose military rifles for their reliability and low cost, but governments fearful of colonial rebellions often banned military-caliber bolt-action magazine rifles and their ammunition. The 9.3×62mm was never a military cartridge and so never had this problem. Mausers in 9.3×62mm were inexpensive and reliable, too, so their popularity in Africa grew quickly and became widespread.

 

The 9.3×74R is a rimmed 9.3 mm cartridge that evolved from the 9.3×72R black powder cartridge. The energy levels of the 9.3×62 and 9.3×74R cartridges are similar but in developmental terms are distinct as the cartridges are unrelated. The rimmed cartridge is slightly longer, allowing for lower pressure in the case while retaining muzzle velocity.

9.3x64mm Brenneke

 

The 9.3×64mm Brenneke (also unofficially known as the 9.3 x 64) is a rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed for big-game hunting. The 9.3 denotes the 9.3 mm bullet diameter and the 64 denotes the 64 mm case length. Using the bullet diameter is unusual in German cartridge designations. Normally the approximate land diameter of the barrel is used for such designations.

 

The 9.3×64mm Brenneke can be chambered in standard-sized Mauser 98 bolt-action rifles. The M 98 bolt actions and magazine boxes of standard military Mauser 98 rifles, however, have to be adapted by a competent gunsmith to function properly with these magnum cartridges since their cases are longer and have a larger diameter than the 8×57mm IS service cartridges.

9.3x65Rmm Brenneke

9.3x65mm Collath

9.3x66mm Sako

9.3x72mmD

9.3x74mmR

9.3×74mmR is a European medium-bore cartridge invented in Germany around 1900.[1]

9.5x57mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer (.375 Rimless Nitro Express x 2-1/4″)

 

 

The 9.5×57mm Mannlicher–Schönauer (MS) cartridge was adopted for the M-1910 MS rifle and carbine in 1910.[2] (Note: The word Schoenauer is often spelled Schönauer with an “umlaut” over the “o”). The 9.5×57mm MS is also known as the 9.5×56mm MS, the 9.5×56.7mm MS, and the .375 Rimless Nitro Express (RNE) × 2¼ (primarily in England). The cartridge may have been created by Westley-Richards and Eley in 1908 (rather than by the Oestereichischer Waffenfabrik-Gessellschaft, Steyr (OWS) (Austrian Arms Manufacturer-Association, Steyr)), but no production rifles in this caliber have been found prior to the M-1910. This development by or on behalf of Steyr was probably an answer to the development by the noted British gunmaking firm of Holland & Holland in 1905 of their .400/.375 Rimless Belted Nitro Express, designed for their specially modified Mannlicher–Schoenauer rifle (they imported the actions from Austria, but built the rifles in house). Whether the development of the 9.5×57mm Mannlicher–Schoenauer cartridge originated with OWS or with Holland’s British competitor, Westley Richards certainly was the principal promoter of the new 1910 Model Mannlicher–Schoenauer rifle as evidenced by catalogs of the time. The 9.5×57mm MS is the last pre-war proprietary cartridge by Steyr and their most powerful until the recent advent of the .376 Steyr, which has its antecedents in the 9.5×57mm.[citation needed]

10.75x57mm

 

10.75x68mm

10.75x73mm

 

The .404 Jeffery is a large-caliber, rimless cartridge[4] designed for large, dangerous game, such as the “Big Five” (elephant, rhino, cape buffalo, lion and leopard) of Africa. Other names for this cartridge include .404 Jeffery Rimless, .404 Rimless Nitro Express, and 10.75× 73mm. It was created by W.J. Jeffery & Co of England based on their desire to duplicate performance of the .450/400 (3¼”) cartridge.[5] There are two basically similar sets of dimensions for this case, depending on the manufacturer.[6] The .404 Jeffery as originally loaded fired a .423″ diameter bullet of either 300 gr (19 g) with a muzzle velocity of 2,600 ft/s (790 m/s) and muzzle energy of 4,500 foot-pounds force (6,100 N·m) or 400 gr (26 g) with a muzzle velocity of 2,125 ft/s (648 m/s) and 4,020 foot-pounds force (5,450 N·m) of energy.[7] It is very effective on large game and is favored by many hunters of dangerous game. Performance and recoil are similar to other African dangerous game cartridges. The .404 Jeffery was popular with hunters and game wardens in Africa because it gave good performance with a manageable level of recoil. By way of comparison, the .416 Rigby and .416 Remington Magnum both fire a 400 grain .416 in bullet at 2,400 feet per second (730 m/s) with a muzzle energy of approximately 5,000 foot-pounds force (6,800 N·m), which handily exceeds the ballistic performance of the .404 Jeffery but at the price of greater recoil and, in the case of the .416 Rigby, rifles that are significantly more expensive.

11x60mm Mauser

The 11mm Mauser (also known as the 11x60mmR Mauser or .43 Mauser) was a black-powder cartridge developed for the Mauser Model 1871 rifle, and used later in the 71/84 variant. It is no longer in production, however it is available from custom loaders and handloading can be done to replenish spent ammunition.

12.7mm British No. 2

 

The .577/500 No 2 Black Powder Express, also known as the 12.7mm British No 2, is a British centerfire fire rifle cartridge.

12.7x99mm NATO (Multi-Purpose)

 

The .50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG, 12.7×99mm NATO and designated as the 50 Browning by the C.I.P.[1]) is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s. Entering service officially in 1921, the round is based on a greatly scaled-up .30-06 cartridge. Under STANAG 4383, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries. The cartridge itself has been made in many variants: multiple generations of regular ball, tracer, armor-piercing (AP), incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds. The rounds intended for machine guns are linked using metallic links.

 

The .50 BMG cartridge is also used in long-range target and anti-materiel rifles, as well as other .50-caliber machine guns.

 

A wide variety of ammunition is available, and the availability of match grade ammunition has increased the usefulness of .50 caliber rifles by allowing more accurate fire than lower quality rounds.[3]

12.7x54mm (subsonic)

 

 

The 12.7×55mm Subsonic cartridge is used in the VKS bullpup sniper rifle. The cartridge can carry a projectile weighing between from 59 grams (911 grains) and 76 g (1173 gr), yielding massive amounts of kinetic energy. The round can penetrate up to 16 mm (0.63 in) of steel at 200 meters or heavy body armor at 100 meters. The accuracy of this cartridge is claimed as to be 1 MOA at 100 meters range.[2]

12.7x108mm

 

The 12.7×108mm cartridge is a heavy machine gun and anti-materiel rifle cartridge used by the former Soviet Union, the former Warsaw Pact, modern Russia, and other countries.

 

It is used in the same roles as the NATO .50 BMG (12.7×99mm NATO) cartridge. The two differ in bullet shape and weight, and the casing of the 12.7×108mm is slightly longer, but smaller muzzle velocity, allowing it to hold slightly more of a different type of powder. The 12.7×108mm can be used to engage a wide variety of targets on the battlefield, and will destroy unarmored vehicles, penetrate lightly armored vehicles and damage external ancillary equipment (i.e.: searchlights, radar, transmitters, vision blocks, engine compartment covers) on heavily armored vehicles such as tanks.[1] Armor-piercing .50 cal ammunition will penetrate around 25 mm of armor. Normal full metal jacket .50 cal ammunition will only dimple tank armor, causing no damage.

13x64B

13.2x92mm

 

 

The Mauser 13.2mm TuF (German: Tank und Flieger; lit. “Tank and Aircraft”, known also as 13.2×92mmSR), was a major step in the development of anti-tank cartridges, being the first cartridge designed for the sole purpose of destroying armored targets.

14.5x114mm

 

The 14.5×114mm (.57 Cal) is a heavy machine gun and anti-materiel rifle cartridge used by the Soviet Union, the former Warsaw Pact, modern Russia, and other countries.

 

It was originally developed for the PTRS and PTRD anti-tank rifles, but was later used as the basis for the KPV heavy machine gun that formed the basis of the ZPU series anti-aircraft guns that is also the main armament of the BTR series of armoured personnel carriers from the BTR-60 to the BTR-80.

 

 

 

14.5 mm JDJ

 

It uses the .50 BMG case with the neck opened up to accept a .585 in (14.9 mm) bullet. It fires the 1,173-grain (76.0 g) bullet at 2,700 ft/s (820 m/s) with the fire-formed load. The Barnes 750-grain (49 g) bullet can also be loaded to 3,000 ft/s (910 m/s). It has a destructive device exemption. Only rifles chambered for the .50 BMG can be converted to this caliber.

15.2 mm Steyr Armor Piercing Fin Stabilized Discarding Sabot (APFSDS)

20 mm caliber

 

 

The 20 mm caliber is a specific size of cannon or autocannon ammunition.

 

There are few weapons (aside from shotguns, large game hunting rifles, and heavy caliber muzzleloading “rampart” or “wall guns” popular in the early mid 19th century European militaries[1]) which have been built that fire projectiles between 12.7mm (such as the 12.7mm NATO) and 20 mm caliber, though there were several 13 mm heavy machine guns used during World War II, such as the MG 131; the 14.5 mm caliber is still used by some Soviet machine guns such as the KPV and anti-tank rifles such as PTRS, PTRD, and NTW-20.

 

Since 20mm is the cutoff point where most nations switch from bullets to shells, it has come to also generally be the cutoff point between weapons classified as a machine gun or a cannon. This can vary, however: for example, in World War II, Japan classified any weapon over 11 mm as a cannon; thus, in Japanese records, their 12.7 mm Ho-103 aircraft gun is classified as an autocannon, as it used explosive shells to overcome its lower muzzle velocity compared to American 12.7mm/.50BMG weapons. A machine gun does not fire shells, so historically a weapon that fires shells below 20 mm can be a cannon. A true definition will always mention whether the weapon fires bullets or shells in addition to its caliber.

 

A very small number of anti-tank rifles have been produced in 20 mm and larger calibers.

 

20 mm caliber cartridges have an outside bullet diameter and inside barrel diameter of 0.787 inches (20.0 mm). Projectiles or bullets are typically 75 to 127 mm (3–5 in) long. Cartridge cases are typically 75 to 152 mm (3–6 in) long. Many but not all 20 mm rounds have an explosive filling and detonating fuze.

 

As an example, the RT-20 (rifle) fires a 20×110mm 130-gram[2] projectile at a muzzle velocity of 850 m/s.[3] For a simple slug this gives a muzzle energy of 47 kilojoules.

20×110 mm USN

 

 

The 20×110mm USN (also known as 20×110mm US Navy and 20mm Mk-100 Series) was developed by the US Navy after World War II for use in Mk 11 and Mk 12 autocannon. They are called the Mk 100 series as they range from Mk 101 to Mk 109.

 

It has the same rim diameter as the 20×102mm but a different length and contour. It is not interchangeable with any other 20×110mm cartridge.[1]

23×115 mm

The 23×115mm round is used by Soviet (USSR)/Russian/CIS aircraft autocannon, most notably by the GSh-23L and GSh-6-23. Although the round has been superseded by the 30×165mm round, the Russian Air Force still uses it in the GSh-23L (in aircraft’s tail turrets and in the UPK-23-250 gunpack/gunpod) and GSh-6-23 (used in Su-24). This round still serves in many countries and is widely available.

23×152 mm

 

The 23×152mmB used by the USSR/CIS in the VYa-23 aircraft autocannon the Ilyushin Il-2 ground attack aircraft and in the 2A7 and 2A14 autocannons on the ZU-23 anti-aircraft gun series and ZSU-23-4 “Shilka”, among others. Note that the ammunition for the VYa-23 uses a brass case and is not functionally interchangeable with the steel-cased ammunition of the modern ZU-23 anti-aircraft gun series. These two weapon systems use different headspace sizes, therefore requiring ammunition of slightly different dimensions. While it is no longer in use in the main anti-aircraft weapons of modern Russia, being replaced by the 30×165mm, it is still in service with the Russian Naval Infantry and many other countries.

25x137mm

 

The 25 mm caliber is a specific size of cannon or autocannon ammunition. It has also been recently used for the anti-materiel rifle. Such ammunition includes the NATO-standard 25×137mm and 25×184mm rounds, as well as the World War II-era French-designed 25×163mm and 25×193.5mmR rounds.

30x165mm

 

The 30 mm caliber is a specific size of autocannon ammunition. Such ammunition includes NATO standard 30×173mm and 30×113mmB rounds and Soviet 30×165mm rounds which are widely used around the world.

30x173mm
The 30 mm caliber is a specific size of autocannon ammunition. Such ammunition includes NATO standard 30×173mm and 30×113mmB rounds and Soviet 30×165mm rounds which are widely used around the world.

Wildcats – Obscure – Proprietary

Inches

.14 Walker Hornet

.14/221

.14-222

 

The .14-222 is a wildcat cartridge that was created in 1985 by Helmut W. Sakschek. It uses a .222 Remington case necked down to accept a .14 caliber bullet.

.17 Ackley Bee

 

 

The .17 Ackley Bee is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge named after its designer, P.O. Ackley, and is a .218 Bee case necked down to .17 caliber with a squarer shoulder and less body taper. Being a rimmed case it was popular with single shot rifles such as the Martini Cadet and Low Wall Winchester.[2] The caliber is well suited to varmint hunting particularly where minimal pelt damage is required.[citation needed]

.17 CCM

 

The .17 CCM (Cooper Centerfire Magnum) is a cartridge. It is a necked down[further explanation needed] version of the .22 CCM. This[which?] cartridge was introduced in 1992 and was originally designed by Mike Hill. Dan Cooper (President of Cooper Arms) further refined the cartridge and chambering to put it into production in the Cooper Model 38 action.

 

The .17 CCM is designed specifically for varmint and small game hunting. Its major benefits are low noise, accuracy and minimal barrel temperature, which makes it a perfect cartridge for prairie dogs. It has an effective range of around 300 yards, but like any other .17 caliber it is sensitive to the wind out past 100 yards.

.17 Hornet

 

The .17 Hornet is a .17 caliber centerfire rifle cartridge originally offered as a “wildcat cartridge” made by P.O. Ackley in the early 1950s. He created this non-factory (wildcat) offering by simply necking-down the .22 Hornet to .17 caliber and fire-forming the resized cases in his new chamber design. The result was a small quiet cartridge capable of high velocity. Ackley mentions it as one of the most balanced of the .17 cartridges of his time; likely, this is still true.[1]

 

Sixty years later, Hornady Manufacturing Company (Grand Island, Nebraska, USA) has taken Ackley’s idea into a commercial product with a similar cartridge; the 17 Hornady Hornet uses a 20 grain (1.3 gram) “Superformance” V-max projectile at a published velocity of 3650fps (1113 metre/second). [2]

 

However, the new standardized ammunition/brass is not built to exactly the same dimensional specifications as the original wildcat or the dimensions listed on this page. Hornady’s standard has a shorter body with less taper and shorter overall case length while the overall loaded length remains that of the original .22 Hornet (in order to fit the standard Hornet Magazines). Shooters wishing to use the .17 Hornady Hornet in a .17 Ackley Hornet chamber will experience the bullet jumping to the rifling and may lose some of the inherent accuracy for which the cartridge has been known.

 

It has been reported the .17 Hornady Hornet uses a thicker rim than the original Hornet case. However, the 9th Edition of the Hornady “Handbook of Cartridge Reloading” shows them to be the same (.065 inches); measuring the rims of actual factory cases shows the Hornady Handbook to be correct. Moreover, Ackley’s “Pocket Manual for Shooters and Reloaders” shows the rim thickness for his wildcat to range between .069″ and .063″ which is consistent with the Hornady Handbook. Both cartridges head-space on this rim.

 

While the Ackley cartridge uses a 30-degree shoulder angle and the Hornady is 25 degrees, its longer shoulder is accommodated by Ackley’s longer case body. Fireforming will move the Hornady’s shoulder forward at the expense of neck length.

 

Yet there is a final size issue: according to Ackley’s Manual, his wildcat cartridge is only .289″ over the shoulder while the Hornady factory round measures .294″. This is the reason the Hornady’s case capacity is almost identical to that of the Ackley. Since there is five thousands less taper in the case body, the new .17 Hornady Hornet cases may not fit an Ackley chamber without full-length resizing.

 

Existing rifles chambered for the Ackley wildcat can have their barrels set back one turn and rechambered to the new .17 Hornady Hornet which meets the SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) standard for the .17 Hornet. This would fix the bullet jump issue and improve ammunition availability with little risk of diminished performance.

.17 Mach IV
The .17 Mach IV is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge, based on the .221 Remington Fireball case, necked down to fire a .172 bullet. The cartridge was introduced in 1962 by Vern O’Brien.[2] The cartridge offered an easy case conversion and good ballistics, but could not compete against the .17 Remington.[3]

 

The name, Mach IV, comes from the claim that the bullets can reach 4,000 ft/s.[4] Due to the relatively small case capacity, even small variations in powder of 0.5 gr (0.032 g) can lead to the difference between a safe and dangerously over pressure load.

 

The .17 Mach IV became very popular with varmint hunters, so much so that in 2007, Remington introduced its own very similar version, the .17 Remington Fireball.

.17 PMC/Aguila

 

The .17 PMC/Aguila or .17 High Standard is a rimfire cartridge formed by necking down the .22 Long Rifle casing to accept a .172″ diameter bullet. This cartridge was developed in 2003 by firearms maker High Standard and ammunition maker Aguila and introduced in 2004. The introduction was ill-timed, however, coming in the middle of the introduction of two major new .17 Rimfires from Hornady, which took over the .17 caliber rimfire market.

 

The .17 Aguila can be shot in a rifle that is chambered for .17 HM2.[2]

.17 PPC

 

.17-06

 

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.17-222

.17-223

 

The .17-223 is a centerfire wildcat rifle cartridge. It is based on the .223 Remington, but the neck is re-sized to accept a .17 caliber bullet.

.17-225 Winchester

.17/23 SMC

.17-357 RG (.172″ Wildcat based on the 357 SIG)

.191 (4.85mm SAA)

.19 Badger

 

Calhoon cartridges are a class of .19 caliber cartridges created by James Calhoon, a firearms designer with an interest in that bore size. Calhoon began working with .19 caliber after his interest was piqued from learning about British sub-caliber rifle trials in the early 1970s. .19 caliber rifles have thicker rifling than .17 and .20 caliber rifles, which helps the barrel stay clean longer and improves barrel life.[2]

.19 Calhoon Hornet

 

Calhoon cartridges are a class of .19 caliber cartridges created by James Calhoon, a firearms designer with an interest in that bore size. Calhoon began working with .19 caliber after his interest was piqued from learning about British sub-caliber rifle trials in the early 1970s. .19 caliber rifles have thicker rifling than .17 and .20 caliber rifles, which helps the barrel stay clean longer and improves barrel life.[2]

.19-223

 

Calhoon cartridges are a class of .19 caliber cartridges created by James Calhoon, a firearms designer with an interest in that bore size. Calhoon began working with .19 caliber after his interest was piqued from learning about British sub-caliber rifle trials in the early 1970s. .19 caliber rifles have thicker rifling than .17 and .20 caliber rifles, which helps the barrel stay clean longer and improves barrel life.[2]

20 BR

 

 

The .20 BR is a centerfire wildcat rifle cartridge. It is based on the .22 BR Remington case necked down to accept a 5.2 millimetres (0.204 in) diameter bullet[1] and maintaining the shoulder angle of 30° and case length of 39 millimetres (1.535 in).[2] The cartridge features a short fat case which is reputed to be both efficient and accurate.[3]

 

The large powder capacity of the case allows it to propel a 2.6 grams (40 gr) bullet at over 1,200 metres per second (4,000 ft/s), however the cartridge is considered overbore and can be expected to have a relatively short barrel life.[1]

 

The inherent accuracy of the BR case design and the high performance of the .20 BR has led to it being adopted by varmint hunters and target shooters.[citation needed]

 

Advantages of this cartridge include; its ability to be chambered in any rifle action which has the .308 Winchester sized bolt face; its short length enables action makers to utilise shorter ports to increase rigidity; and cases are easily formed and loaded.[citation needed]

20 Fergusson Ace

 

 

The .20 Ferguson Ace is one of a family of wildcat centerfire rifle cartridges based upon the 6mm BR. The .20 Ferguson Ace was probably designed and developed around 2002-2003 by gunsmith and varmint hunter Gaylon ‘Ace’ Ferguson.[1]

 

Each cartridge in the Ferguson Ace family shares the same body shape and is necked up and down for calibers from .20 to 6.5mm. The case body is longer and wider than the 6mm BR, has a shorter neck and a shoulder angle of 45 degrees which give it approximately 10% more powder capacity than its parent.[2] This allows higher bullet velocities than an unimproved 6mm BR case. An example round recorded 4220fps with a 40 grain V-Max when fired from a 24″ pac-nor 1-11″ twist barrel.[citation needed] This performance comes at the cost of the barrel with life expectancy in around 500-600 shots.

 

.20 Ferguson Ace cases are usually formed from .22 BR Remington stock, then necked down to .204″ and fire formed in the custom chamber of the rifle. Major drawbacks are the scarcity of both reloading dies and chamber reamers in this format. CH4D offer dies for the .22 Ferguson Ace.[3]

20 Magna

 

20 PPC

 

.20 Tactical

 

The .20 Tactical is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge, based on the .223 Remington case, necked down to fire a 5.2 millimetres (0.204 in) caliber bullet. The .20 Tactical was designed by Todd Kindler and predates the .204 Ruger factory round. The case has approximately 0.2 grams (3 gr) less powder capacity than the popular .204 Ruger. Handloaders can get velocities with 2.1 and 2.6 grams (32 and 40 gr) projectiles that almost match the .204 Ruger. Furthermore, the .20 Tactical is also able to achieve these velocities with less powder than the .204 Ruger by more efficiently using high energy propellants such as Alliant Reloader 7 and Winchester 748. Based on the .223 Remington, a wide selection of brass is available. Lapua produces high quality cases in .20 Tactical sold under the Dakota Arms brand.

.20 VarTarg

 

 

The .20 VarTarg is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge, based on the .221 Remington Fireball case, necked down to fire a 5.2 millimetres (0.204 in) bullet.

 

The name VarTarg is a portmanteau of varmint and target.

 

There is also a .20 VarTarg Turbo based on the .222 Remington

.20-06

 

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.218 Mashburn Bee

 

.219 Donaldson Wasp

 

 

The .219 Donaldson Wasp cartridge was developed during the late 1930s by Harvey Donaldson, and is derived from the .219 Zipper case. Once popular amongst match shooters in the 1940s it has since fallen by the wayside in favor of newer developments. It is however held in high regard for its accuracy and is widely considered the grandfather of benchrest cartridges. Today the round occupies a niche in the falling-block rifle market.

 

There are in fact three notable versions associated with the Wasp name. The first, designed in the mid 1930s and today known as the 219 Gipson Wasp, was named after the gunsmith who chambered the first Wasp rifle for Donaldson. This version has a case length measuring 1.625″ and was formed from rimless 25 Remington brass.

 

Donaldson shifted his experimentation to the 219 Zipper brass soon after the introduction of that cartridge by Winchester in 1937. By approximately 1940 Donaldson had lengthened the body of the Wasp case to increase capacity from around 24 to 28 grains of IMR 3031 powder – to see if velocity could be increased while maintaining accuracy. To Donaldson’s delight, the larger case produced both higher velocity and superior accuracy. This development work is detailed in a series of letters written by Donaldson and collectively published in Yours Truly by Wolfe Publishing Company (1980).

 

Donaldson later lengthened the neck by about 1/32″ so as not to encroach on powder capacity when using a graphite wad behind the bullet. This resulted in a case length of 1.750″. This final design is preserved in a drawing on page 224 of Twenty-Two Caliber Varmint Rifles by Charles S. Landis (1946).

 

During the 1960s an even longer version appeared as a result of measurements referenced from the front of the rim instead of the rear. This design has a case length of 1.813″ (1.750″ plus 0.063″ rim thickness). The same error has occurred on a number of other popular wildcats.

.22 BR Remington

 

 

The .22 Bench Rest Remington cartridge, commonly referred to as the .22 BR Remington, is a wildcat cartridge commonly used in varmint hunting and benchrest shooting. It is based on the .308×1.5-inch Barnes cartridge, necked down to .22 caliber, lengthened by .020 inches and with the shoulder angle increased to 30°. It was first developed in approximately 1963 by Jim Stekl, and in 1978 Remington standardized the dimensions. It is renowned for its high velocities and excellent accuracy.[2]

.22 Cheetah

 

The .22 CHeetah (both C and H are upper-case,[1] referring to Carmichel / Huntington[2]) is a .22 wildcat cartridge developed in the 1970s or 1980s by Jim Carmichel and Fred Huntington.[3]

 

The .22 CHeetah is essentially a Remington 308 BR, modified to fit the 22 caliber,[4] and is the most popular wildcat; two custom gunmakers, Shilen Rifle Company and Wichita Engineering, are now making rifles specifically for the cartridge.[5] The cartridge’s 50-grain .22-caliber bullets have a muzzle speed upward of 4,300 ft/s (4,250 according to some[6]), and the cartridge is known for its long-range accuracy and velocity.[2] Its high intensity is notoriously hard on barrels, which require constant cleaning.[6][7]

.22 Eargesplitten Loudenboomer

 

.22 Eargesplitten Loudenboomer is a cartridge for a rifle.

 

It was invented in the 1960s by P.O. Ackley to set a world record for firing bullets at over 5000 fps (1524 m/s). The round failed to reach the desired velocity, but reached 4600 fps with a 50 grain bullet and 105 grains of H570 powder. It is based on the .378 Weatherby Magnum cartridge case, necked down to .224 calibre.

.22 K Hornet

.22 Newton

.22 PPC

 

The 22 PPC was developed in 1974 by Dr. Louis Palmisano and Ferris Pindell, primarily as a benchrest cartridge. Although originally a wildcat, Sako of Finland introduced commercial rifles and ammunition late in 1987. Norma followed suit in 1993 with loaded ammunition. The cartridge is based on the 220 Russian case which is a necked-down version of the 7.62x39mm Soviet military cartridge. The Wichita Engineering and Supply Co. made the first rifles for both the 22 and 6mm PPC cartridges. Many custom rifles have been turned out in this caliber. In 1993 Ruger announced their No. 1 V and M77 varmint rifles in this caliber.

 

General Comments

 

The originators altered the 220 Russian case by giving it a 10-degree body taper and 30-degree shoulder angle, as well as expanding the neck to accept the standard .224- inch diameter bullet used in the U.S. The cartridge cases are made in Finland by Sako or in Sweden by Norma and use Small Rifle primers. Although the 22 PPC is a short rather stubby case only 1.51 inches long, it nevertheless develops ballistics superior to some larger, longer cartridges such as the 222 and 223 Remington. The 52-grain bullet can be pushed out of the muzzle at over 3500 fps, and this definitely places the 22 PPC in the varmint and small game class. A 1 in 14-inch twist has become pretty much standard for these rifles although 1 in 12-inch twist will sometimes be found.

.22 Savage High Power

 

The 5.6×52mmR cartridge was created by Charles Newton and produced by Savage Arms in 1912. It is also known as the .22 Savage High-Power and .22 “Imp”, and is based upon the .25-35 Winchester cartridge necked down to accept a .227in/.228in diameter bullet. Its original loading was a 70 grain soft point bullet with a velocity of around 2700–2800 feet per second depending on the rifle.

.22 Spitfire

 

The .22 Spitfire (also known as 5.7mm Johnson or MMJ 5.7mm Johnson[1]) is an American rifle cartridge.

 

Designed by Melvin M. Johnson of Johnson Guns Inc. for their conversion of the M1 carbine,[2] this wildcat[3] was introduced in 1963. It was based on the .30 carbine, necked-down to .22 (5.7mm).[4]

 

It is suitable for rabbits, coyotes, or other varmints,[4] and has potential as a military round.[4]

.22 Super Jet

.22 Waldog

.22 WCF

 

.22 Winchester Centerfire (.22 WCF) is a small centerfire cartridge introduced in 1885 for use in the Winchester Model 1885 single-shot rifle. Factory manufacture of ammunition was discontinued in 1936. The .22 WCF was loaded with a 45 grain bullet with a muzzle velocity of about 1550 feet per second, similar to the performance of the .22 Winchester Rimfire (.22 WRF) designed in 1890.[2] [3] [4] [5]

 

Experimentation with the .22 WCF among civilian wildcatters and the U.S. military at Springfield Armory in the 1920s led to the development of the .22 Hornet cartridge.[6]

.22-06

 

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.22-15-60 Stevens

.22-243 Middlestead

.22-284 Winchester

.22/30 (T65 Duplex)

.22/30-30 Improved

.22/303

 

 

The .303/22, sometimes known as the .22/303 is a wildcat centrefire rifle cartridge, based on the .303 British, necked down to fire a .224 projectile, originating in Australia in the 1930s as a cartridge for sporterised rifles, particularly on the Lee–Enfield action, similar versions also appeared in Canada around the same time.[3]

 

The .303/22 was very popular for a number of reasons, one being that the .22 caliber was better suited to small game than the .303, the rifles were cheap and plentiful and in New South Wales ownership of military cartridges was severely restricted. Several versions existed, including the full length Falcon, the shortened Sprinter, the even shorter Wasp, the Varmint-R and many others.[4] Although Lee–Enfields were the most common, conversion of other rifles mostly suited to rimmed cartridges such as P14 Enfield, Martini–Enfield, 1885 and 1895 Winchesters were often seen, as well as 98 and 96 Mausers.[5]

 

Loaded ammunition and brass was produced by the Super Cartridge Company, Riverbrand, ICI and Sportco, some using new Boxer primed cases, others using military Berdan primed cases. Cases can be formed simply by necking down .303 British brass available from Remington, Federal, Winchester, Sellier & Bellot and others. Reloading dies are made by most larger manufacturers, like RCBS, CH[6] and Simplex.[7]

.220 Weatherby Rocket

.222 Rimmed

 

 

The .222 Rimmed is a centrefire rifle cartridge, originating in Australia in the 1960s as a cartridge for single shot rifles, particularly the Martini Cadet action.[3] Performance is similar to the .222 Remington on which it is based however loads should be reduced as the walls of the brass cases are generally thicker.[4] Extraction of cases that have been loaded to higher pressures can be difficult due to the inefficient extraction method utilised by the Martini Cadet.

 

Cases and loaded rounds were originally produced by the Super Cartridge Company.[5] Brass is now available from the Bertram Bullet Company[6] or can be made from 5.6x50mmR RWS cases.[4]

 

The .222 Rimmed has also been used as a parent case for wildcats, similar to ones based on the .222 Remington, such as rimmed versions of the .17 Mach IV, the .17-222, and the .20 VarTarg.[7]

.223 AI

 

The .223 Remington (.223 Rem) is a rifle cartridge. The name is commonly pronounced either two-twenty-three or two-two-three Remington. It is commercially loaded with 0.224 inch (5.56 mm) diameter jacketed bullets, with weights ranging from 40 to 85 grains (2.6 to 5.8 g), though the most common loading by far is 55 grains (3.6 g). A 90 gr Sierra Matchking bullet is available for reloaders. [3] The .223 Rem was first offered to the civilian sporting market in December 1963 in the Remington 760 rifle. [4] In 1964 the .223 Rem cartridge was adopted for use in the Colt M16 rifle which became an alternate standard rifle of the U.S. Army. The military version of the cartridge uses a 55 gr full metal jacket boattail design and was designated M193. In 1980 NATO modified the .223 Remington into a new design which is designated 5.56×45mm NATO type SS109. [5]

.224 Donaldson Ace

.240 Apex (.240 Belted Nitro Express and .240 Magnum Flanged)

 

 

The .240 Holland & Holland Magnum (also known as the .240 Apex, .240 Belted Nitro Express, .240 Magnum Rimless, or .240 Super Express) is a centrefire sporting rifle cartridge developed in England in the 1920s, primarily for use in hunting deer and plains game. This round has always been closely associated with the firm of Holland & Holland, rifle and gun makers of London, England, which has built more magazine and double rifles in this calibre than anyone else. A rimmed variant of this cartridge, known as the .240 Magnum Flanged, was developed for use in double rifles.[1]

.25 Ackley Krag
.25 Gibbs

.25 Krag

.25 Remington

 

The .25 Remington (also known as the .25 Remington Auto-Loading) is an American rifle cartridge. A rimless, smokeless powder design, this cartridge was considered to be very accurate by period firearm experts and suitable for game up to deer and black bear.[1]

 

The .25 Remington cartridge dates to 1906 and its introduction by Remington in the Model 8 rifle. Other rifles chambered for the .25 Remington include the Remington 14 slide-action, Remington 30 bolt action, Stevens 425 lever-action, and Standard Arms rifles. Due to their similar dimensions, the .25 Remington, .30 Remington, and .32 Remington together were known as the Remington Rimless cartridge series.[2] Firearm manufacturers generally offered all three of these cartridges as chamberings in a rifle model rather than just one of the series. The series was competitive with Winchester Repeating Arms Company’s contemporary lever action offerings: .25-35 Winchester, .30-30, and .32 Winchester Special.

 

The .25 Remington case was shortened and necked down to .22 caliber to form Lysle Kilbourn’s wildcat .22 Kilbourn Magnum Junior and the rimless version of Leslie Lindahl’s wildcat .22 Chucker.[3]

 

Harvey Donaldson also used the .25 Remington case in early experiments that would eventually lead to the creation of the .219 Donaldson Wasp. Donaldson later switched his experimentation to Winchester .219 Zipper brass after the launch of that cartridge in 1937.

.25-21 Stevens

 

 

The .25-21 Stevens was an American centerfire rifle cartridge.[1]

 

Designed by Capt. W. L. Carpenter, 9th U.S. Infantry, in 1897,[1] the .25-21 was a bottlenecked round, based on the longer .25-25.[1] It was Stevens’ second straight-cased cartridge (after the .25-25)[2] and would be used in the single shot Model 44 rifle, as well as the Model 44½, which first went on sale in 1903.[2] In addition, it was available in the Remington-Hepburn target rifle.[1]

 

While the .25-25 was popular, the .25-21 offered “practically the same performance and was a little cleaner shooting.”[2] It was also found the usual 20 or 21 gr (1.30 or 1.36 g) black powder charge of the shorter, bottlenecked .25-21 offered “practically the same ballistics” as 24 or 25 gr (1.56 or 1.62 g) in the .25-25. It was highly accurate, reputedly capable of generating .5 in (12.7 mm) groups at 100 yd (91 m).[1]

 

In power, the .25-21 was outpaced by the .25-20 WCF[3] and .32-20 Winchester,[4] while today, even modern pistol rounds such as the .38 Super offer superior performance.[5]

.25-25 Stevens

 

The .25-25 Stevens was an American centerfire rifle cartridge.[1]

 

Designed by Capt. W. L. Carpenter, 9th U.S. Infantry,[2] in 1895,[1] the .25-25 Stevens was the company’s first straight-cased cartridge.[1] It would be used in Stevens’ single shot Model 44, as well as the Model 44½ rifles, which first went on sale in 1903.[1] In addition, it was available in the Remington-Hepburn target rifle.

 

While the .25-25 was popular, the .25-21 offered “practically the same performance and was a little cleaner shooting.”[1] It also suffered a “freakish”[1] appearance, due to its length to diameter ratio.[1] It was also found the usual 20 or 21 gr (1.30 or 1.36 g) black powder charge of the shorter, bottlenecked.[3] 25-21 offered “practically the same ballistics” as 24 or 25 gr (1.56 or 1.62 g) in the .25-25.

 

The switch to smokeless powder only exacerbated the problem, due to the small charge.[1] To cure this, handloaders use a mix of 3 to 5 gr (0.19 to 0.32 g) of bulk shotgun powder and 18 to 20 gr (1.2 to 1.3 g) of black powder, with bullets of between 60 to 86 gr (3.9 to 5.6 g).

.256 Newton

 

 

The .256 Newton is a high-velocity rimless cartridge and was developed by Charles Newton in 1913 in conjunction with the Western Cartridge Company. It is a 30-06 Springfield cartridge, shortened[1] and necked down to .264) with a different shoulder angle. However, the .256 Newton and the .30-06 are not interchangeable. The .256 Newton and the 6.5-06 are not interchangeable.

.256 Winchester Magnum

 

The .256 Winchester Magnum was a firearms cartridge developed by Winchester, and was produced by necking-down a .357 Magnum cartridge to .257 diameter. It was designed for shooting small game and varmints. Introduced in 1960, Winchester offered ammo and reloading components into the early 1990s. The cartridge was first chambered in the Ruger Hawkeye single shot pistol. The next year (1962) Marlin chambered their Model 62 Levermatic rifle for the new Winchester cartridge. These were the two principle firearms chambered for the .256 Win. Mag. It is now obsolete and only offered as a chambering by custom manufacturers of single-shot firearm barrels such as Match Grade Machine and Bullberry. Previously, the T/C Custom Shop had produced some, before closing its doors forever in 2010.

 

From an 8.5 inch pistol barrel the 60 grain .256 Winchester factory load was advertised as having a MV of 2350 fps and ME of 735 ft. lbs. This was 250 fps faster and nearly twice as powerful as the .22 Remington Jet, a varmint cartridge for revolvers that was also based on a necked-down .357 Magnum case.

 

According to data from the fifth edition of the Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading handloaders with a .256 rifle can approximately duplicate the Winchester factory load using the Hornady 60 grain Flat Point bullet in front of 15.5 grains of H4227 powder for a MV of 2700 fps. The trajectory of that load looks like this: +2.3 inches at 50 yards, +4.4 inches at 100 yards, 0 at 200 yards, and -26.2 inches at 300 yards.

 

Winchester offered factory loaded .256 Magnum ammunition (and brass to reloaders) into the beginning of the 1990s. Winchester .256 factory loads used a 60 grain Open Point Expanding bullet at a MV of 2760 fps and ME of 1015 ft. lbs. from a 24-inch rifle barrel. That is about 500 fps faster than Winchester factory loads for the old .25-20 cartridge. At 200 yards the velocity was 1542 fps and the remaining energy was 317 ft. lbs.

.264 LBC-AR

 

The 6.5mm Grendel (6.5×39mm) is an intermediate cartridge designed by Arne Brennan, Bill Alexander, and Janne Pohjoispää as a low recoil, high accuracy, 200–800 yard cartridge specifically for the AR-15. It is an improved variation of the 6.5mm PPC.[4] Since its introduction, it has proven to be a versatile design and is now expanding out into other firearms including bolt-action rifles and the Kalashnikov system.[5]

 

The name “6.5mm Grendel” was a trademark owned by Alexander Arms until it was legally released to allow the cartridge to become SAAMI standardized.[6][7]

.264 warrior magnum (6.5×40 mm)

.25/303

 

The .303/25, sometimes known as the .25/303 is a wildcat centrefire rifle cartridge, based on the .303 British, necked down to fire a .257 projectile, originating in Australia in the 1940s as a cartridge for sporterised rifles, particularly on the Lee–Enfield action; similar versions also appeared in Canada around the same time.[3]

.270 Titus Savage

.275 H&H Magnum

 

The .275 Holland & Holland Magnum is a semi-obsolete rifle cartridge similar to the 7mm Remington Magnum. Essentially the .275 Holland & Holland Magnum is a necked down shortened variant of the .375 Holland & Holland Magnum. It was introduced by the British company Holland & Holland with the .375 Holland & Holland Magnum that was introduced in 1912 as the .375 Belted Rimless Nitro-Express. The .375 Holland & Holland Magnum was intended for dangerous African game animals, while the .275 Holland & Holland Magnum was intended for longer range shooting of antelope in Africa and Red Stag in the highlands of Scotland.

.280 British

 

The .280 British was an experimental rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge. It was later designated 7 mm MK1Z, and has also been known as 7 mm NATO, .280/30, .280 Enfield, .280 NATO, 7 mm FN Short, and 7×43mm.

 

Like most armed forces in the immediate post-World War II era, the British Army began experimenting with lighter rounds after meeting the German StG 44 in combat. The Army began development in the late 1940s, with subsequent help from Fabrique Nationale in Belgium and the Canadian Army. The .280 British was tested in a variety of rifles and machine guns including the EM-2, Lee–Enfield, FN FAL, Bren, M1 Garand and Taden gun.

 

Despite its success as an intermediate cartridge, the .280 British was not considered powerful enough by the U.S. Army and several variants of the .280 British were created in an attempt to appease the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army continued to reject these variants, ultimately adopting the 7.62×51mm NATO.

.276 Enfield
The .276 Enfield was an experimental military rifle cartridge developed in conjunction with the Pattern 1913 Enfield (P’13) rifle. Development was discontinued by the onset of World War I.

.276 Pedersen
The .276 Pedersen (7×51mm) round was an experimental 7 mm cartridge developed for the U.S. Army and used in the Pedersen rifle and early versions of what would become the M1 Garand.

.280 Ross
The .280 Ross, also known as the .280 Nitro, .280 Rimless Nitro Express Ross (CIP) and .280 Rimless cartridge, is an approximately 7mm bullet diameter rifle round developed in Canada by F.W. Jones as a consultant to Sir Charles Ross, 9th Baronet, and his Ross Rifle Company of Quebec, Canada for use as a Canadian military cartridge as a replacement for the .303 British, and in a civilianised and sporterised version of his controversial Mark II and Mk III Ross rifle, and first commercially produced by Eley Brothers of London, England, in late 1907.[1]

.30 BR

.30 USA

.30 Walker

 

This cartridge is an improved version of the PPC cartridge family necked up to accept .308″ bullets. The .30 Walker was designed for 100-300 yard bench rest and f-class shooting using 112-118 grain flat based bullets in slow twist rate barrels.

 

The .30 Walker case may be made by using Lapua 6.5 mm Grendel brass and increasing the caliber to .308 and turning the neck diameter to .330″.

.30-03

 

The .30-03 was a short-lived cartridge developed by the United States in 1903, to replace the .30-40 Krag in the new Springfield 1903 rifle. The .30-03 was also called the .30-45, since it used a 45 grain (2.9 g (0.10 oz)) powder charge; the name was changed to .30-03 to indicate the year of adoption.[2] It used a 220 grain (14 g (0.49 oz)) roundnose bullet. It was replaced after only three years of service by the .30-06, firing a spitzer bullet giving better ballistic performance.[3]

.309 jdj

.30-06 JDJ

 

Compared to a default .30-06 round, the .30-06 JDJ contains has a smaller neck that is at a 60-degree angle. However, the biggest difference is that the .30-06 JDJ has little body taper compared to the original .30-06 cartridge. This allows the .30-06 JDJ to hold an extra 5 grains of water (4.875 cm3) compared to the .30-06 Springfield, allowing one to put more gunpowder into the cartridge.[1]

 

This round manages to replicate in a pistol the ballistics of a .30-06 round fired from a rifle. For example, a .30-06 JDJ cartridge with a 200-grain bullet fired from a custom Contender has a muzzle velocity of 2,504 ft/s (763 m/s), while a regular .30-06 cartridge with a 200-grain bullet with 55 grains of gunpowder has a velocity of 2,558 ft/s (780 m/s).[2]

.309 Bull

.300 Dakota

.300 ICL Grizzly

 

ICL cartridges (ICL stands for Increased Case Load) are rare hunting wildcat cartridges developed by Arnold & Vern Juenke,[2] gunsmiths who owned Saturn Gun Works in Reno, Nevada. ICL cartridges are wildcats based on conventional cases in use at the time. They feature a 45 degree shoulder[3] and the sides are straightened out compared to the parent cartridge. Most of the cartridges are considered improved cartridges since they simply create more powder space while maintaining the same caliber as the parent cartridge. Most of the line of cartridges carries an animal name in addition to a numeric designation. It is one of the most complete lines of wildcats, having a large number of cartridges with a variety of calibers.[4]

 

Quality Cartridge is the only manufacturer making new brass cases correctly headstamped for many ICL cartridges.[5]

.300 Lapua Magnum

 

The .300 Lapua Magnum (7.62×70mm) is a specialized rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed for long-range rifles. The commercially successful .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge has functioned as the parent case for the .300 Lapua Magnum, which is essentially a necked-down version of the .338 Lapua Magnum. The .338 cartridge case was used for this since it has the capability to operate with high chamber pressures which, combined with smaller and hence lighter bullets result in very high muzzle velocities.

.300 Remington American Magnum

.300 Whisper (.300 Fireball)

 

The .300 Whisper is a CIP standard[1] cartridge in the Whisper family, a group of cartridges developed in the early 1990s by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries. It was developed as a multi-purpose cartridge, capable of utilizing relatively lightweight bullets at supersonic velocities as well as heavier bullets (200–250 grains) at subsonic velocities.

 

.300 Whisper is also sometimes known as .300 Fireball or .300-221, but the .300 Whisper is a CIP cartridge and other names are generally known as wildcat cartridges. When compared to .300 AAC Blackout this sentence from Steve Johnson’s article in American Hunter sums it up best, “Given the fact that major manufacturers such as Hornady are building ammunition headstamped .300 Whisper and recommending it for use in either platform—in addition to producing reloading dies that are marked “300 Whisper/Blackout” and Smith & Wesson stamps the barrel of its M&P-15 Whisper barrels with: “300 Whisper/300 AAC Blackout” it is safe to say that differences are minimal. “.[2] CIP has specifications for both .300 Whisper and .300 Blackout cartridges that are very similar, though all manufactures will recommend using the correct ammunition with the correct firearm.

.300-221

 

The .300 Whisper is a CIP standard[1] cartridge in the Whisper family, a group of cartridges developed in the early 1990s by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries. It was developed as a multi-purpose cartridge, capable of utilizing relatively lightweight bullets at supersonic velocities as well as heavier bullets (200–250 grains) at subsonic velocities.

 

.300 Whisper is also sometimes known as .300 Fireball or .300-221, but the .300 Whisper is a CIP cartridge and other names are generally known as wildcat cartridges. When compared to .300 AAC Blackout this sentence from Steve Johnson’s article in American Hunter sums it up best, “Given the fact that major manufacturers such as Hornady are building ammunition headstamped .300 Whisper and recommending it for use in either platform—in addition to producing reloading dies that are marked “300 Whisper/Blackout” and Smith & Wesson stamps the barrel of its M&P-15 Whisper barrels with: “300 Whisper/300 AAC Blackout” it is safe to say that differences are minimal. “.[2] CIP has specifications for both .300 Whisper and .300 Blackout cartridges that are very similar, though all manufactures will recommend using the correct ammunition with the correct firearm.

.303-06

 

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.330 Dakota

.333 Jeffery Flanged

 

The .333 Jeffery and .333 Jeffery Flanged are medium bore centrefire rifle cartridges developed by W.J. Jeffery & Co and introduced in 1908.

.333 OKH

.338-06 A-Square

 

The .338-06 is a wildcat cartridge based on the .30-06. It allows heavier .338 caliber bullets to be used from the .30-06 non-belted case. This is a better choice for heavy bodied game such as moose, elk, and brown bear than the .30-06. 338 caliber bullets became more widely available after the introduction in the late 1950s of the .338 Winchester Magnum cartridge, frequently chambered in the Winchester Model 70 rifle. The .338-06 maintains much of the benefits of the .338 Magnum cartridge but has substantially less recoil, makes more efficient use of powder, and allows use of widely available .30-06 commercial and military cases. It is similar in concept to the .333 OKH as well as the .35 Whelen, which also use the .30-06 brass case as a basis for the cartridge. Thanks to the large number of rifles based on the .30-06 family of cartridges, having a .338-06 made usually only requires a simple barrel change by a competent gun smith. A-Square adopted the caliber as the .338-06 A-Square in approximately 1998, and was approved by SAAMI as a standardized caliber. Weatherby offered factory rifles and ammunition, but has now dropped the rifles from its inventory. The 338-06 A-Square tends to have a velocity advantage over the .35 Whelen and uses bullets that retain velocity and resist wind drift better than similar weight bullets fired from the .35 Whelen.

.338 Hawk/Scoville

.338 Whisper

 

The .338 Whisper is a wildcat cartridge in the Whisper family, a group of cartridges developed in the early 1990s by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries.[1] Unlike the smaller caliber cartridges in the Whisper family, loads for the .338 Whisper are mainly limited to subsonic velocities.[2]

.338 Voschol

.338 x 57 O’Connor

.35 Samba (Also .35 WSM)

.357/.44 B & D (Bain and Davis)

.375 Dakota

 

 

The .375 Dakota is dangerous game cartridge designed by Don Allen, the founder of Dakota Arms of Sturgis, South Dakota.

 

Like the .375 Ruger and the .376 Steyr, the .375 Dakota was designed to compete with the .375 H&H Magnum, yet have the advantage of having a rimless, beltless case and can function through a standard-length rifle action due to a shorter overall length. Like the .375 Remington Ultra Magnum, this cartridge is based on the Canadian Magnum series of rifle cartridges developed by Aubrey White and Noburo Uno, which were based on the .404 Jeffery cartridge. However, unlike the .375 RUM and the .375 Canadian Magnum cartridges which have rebated rims, the Dakota is of a rimless design. Since the .375 Dakota is a proprietary cartridge neither SAAMI or the CIP have provided guidelines or specifications concerning the cartridge.

 

The .375 Dakota is available in the Dakota Model 76 and Model 97 bolt-action riles and the Model 10 and Miller single-shot rifles. Both the Model 76 and Model 97 rifles are based on the Winchester pre-’64 Mauser design while the Model 10 and Miller are falling-block rifles.

.375 Whisper

 

Modern .375 H&H (based on full length 375 Ruger)
.40-65 Winchester

The .40-65 Winchester (also called the .40-65 Winchester and Marlin)[1] was an American rifle cartridge.

 

Introduced in 1887 for the Winchester Model 1886, and available in Winchester single shots and in the Marlin Model 1895, it was “a further effort to put more steam” in repeating rifle cartridges.[2] In the modern era, the cartridge has gained favor for metallic silhouette shooting and Black Powder Cartridge Rifle matches where is serves as a low-recoil alternative to the common 45-70.[3][4]

 

It was commercially available in black and smokeless varieties until around 1935, and can be handloaded by reforming .45-70 brass.[2]

.40-70 Sharps

.400 Whelen

The .400 Whelen cartridge was developed by Colonel Townsend Whelen while he was commanding officer of Frankford Arsenal in the early 1920s.[2] The cartridge resembles a .30-06 Springfield case necked up to .40 caliber to accept bullets manufactured for the .405 Winchester.

.416 Taylor

The .416 Taylor is a rifle cartridge. According to Ken Waters in Pet Loads, it was created by Robert Chatfield-Taylor in the early 1970s, with the first rifle in this caliber being a factory barreled Winchester Model 70.[1] The case is based on the .458 Winchester Magnum necked down to accept .416 caliber bullets.

.416 Whisper

Modern 416 (based on full length 375 Ruger)

.425 Westley Richards

 

It is a cartridge invented by Leslie Taylor of Westley Richards, a gunmaking firm of Birmingham England in 1909 as a proprietary cartridge for their bolt action rifles. Often referred to as the “Poor Man’s Magnum” the round has the unusual characteristic of having a rebated rim, one that is smaller in diameter than the case body. This allowed it to be used in converted Mauser 98 magazine rifles with a standard (.30-06 size) magazine length and bolt face. The rebated rim also allowed Government Game Officers to use stripper clips for rapid reloads when culling rogue animals.

 

The .425 later served as the parent case for the .458 SOCOM.

.44 Henry

 

The .44 Henry, also known as the .44 Rimfire, the .44 Long Rimfire, or the 11x23mmR (11x23mm Rimmed) in Europe, is a rimfire rifle and handgun cartridge featuring a .875 in (22.2 mm)-long brass or copper case. The round has a total overall length of 1.345 in (34.2 mm), with a 200 or 216 gr (12.96 or 14.00 g; 0.46 or 0.49 oz) .446 in (11.3 mm)-diameter cast solid-lead heeled bullet. The original propellant load is 26 to 28 gr (1.68 to 1.81 g; 0.06 to 0.06 oz) of black powder. The round has a muzzle velocity of approximately 1,125 ft/s (343 m/s), giving a muzzle energy of 568 foot-pounds (770 joules ).

Template:.44 –WSP

.45-90 Sharps

 

The .45-90 Sharps cartridge is a black powder round introduced in 1877 by the Sharps Rifle Manufacturing Company. Also known as the .45 2 4/10, the cartridge was developed for hunting and long range target shooting. In the modern day, it is used for Black Powder Cartridge Rifle competitions.[1]

 

While various bullet weights were used, a typical load for the .45-90 was a powder charge 90 grains (5.8 g) gunpowder (black powder) with a bullet weighing 400 grains (26 g). Such a load would have about 1,300 ft/s (400 m/s) muzzle velocity.

.45-110 Sharps

.45-120 Sharps

.450 Watts Magnum

 

The .458 Lott is a .458 caliber belted hunting cartridge designed as a replacement for the less powerful .458 Winchester Magnum. It is based on the full length .375 H&H Magnum blown out and shortened to 2.800 inches (71.1 mm). The cartridge is designed for the purpose of hunting African dangerous game.[1]

The .458 Lott was designed in response to perceived inadequacies and problems encountered with the .458 Winchester Magnum. While the cartridge was slow to gain popularity at first, it is now becoming the standard by which dangerous game cartridges are judged.[citation needed] The cartridge provides a distinct step up in performance over the .458 Winchester Magnum. A-Square, Česká Zbrojovka/Brno, Hornady and Ruger have been instrumental in the cartridge’s rise in popularity.

Modern 450 (2.598″ 404 Case)

Modern 460 (2.850″ 404 Case)

.458 SOCOM

 

The .458 SOCOM (11.63×40mm) is a moderately large round designed for a specialized upper receiver that can be mounted on any AR-15 pattern lower receiver. The 300-grain (19 g) round offers a supersonic muzzle velocity of 1,900 ft/s (580 m/s) and 2,405 ft·lbf (3,261 J),[1] similar to .45-70 but with a much smaller case suited to an automatic type action.

.470 Capstick

 

The .470 Capstick is a rifle cartridge created by Col. Arthur B Alphin from A-Square in 1990, named after writer and hunter Peter Hathaway Capstick.[1] It is based on a .375 H&H Magnum case blown out and necked to accept a .475 inch (12 mm) bullet. With 500 grain (32 g) bullets, it can achieve 2400 feet per second (730 m/s) muzzle velocity from a 26″ barrel.

.475 OKH

 

.475 Ackley

.50 Razor Back

.500 Phantom

.550 Magnum

.600/577 REWA

.700 AHR

.700 WTF

 

Metric Cartridges

Metric
Smaller than 6mm
4.6x30mm

The HK 4.6×30mm cartridge is a type of ammunition primarily used in the Heckler & Koch MP7 Personal Defense Weapon (PDW). It is designed to minimize weight and recoil while increasing penetration of body armor. It features a bottlenecked case and a pointed, steel-core, brass-jacketed bullet.
4.85x49mm

The 4.85×49mm is an experimental intermediate firearm cartridge made by the United Kingdom for the Individual Weapon project, which became the SA80 series of small arms.
4.92x34mm

 

5.45x39mm

The 5.45×39mm cartridge is a rimless bottlenecked Intermediate cartridge. It was introduced into service in 1974 by the Soviet Union for use with the new AK-74 assault rifle. The 5.45×39mm gradually supplemented, then largely replaced the 7.62×39mm cartridge in Soviet and Warsaw Pact service as their primary military service rifle cartridge.
5.56×30mm MINSAS

The 5.56×30mm MINSAS is an ammunition manufactured by the Ordnance Factories Board for close quarter battle use.[1] OFB claims that its penetration rate is better than 9mm caliber.[2]

It’s currently chambered in the Modern Sub Machine Carbine and Amogh carbine.[3]

5.56x45mm NATO

The 5.56×45mm NATO (official NATO nomenclature 5.56 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge family developed in Belgium by FN Herstal.[4] It consists of the SS109, SS110, and SS111 cartridges. Under STANAG 4172, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries.[5] It is derived from, but is not identical to, the .223 Remington cartridge.

5.6x50mm Magnum

The 5.6×50mm Magnum (designated as the 5,6 × 50 Mag. by the C.I.P.[2]) is a centerfire, rimless, bottlenecked rifle cartridge that was developed in 1970 by Günter Frères of the Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM).
5.6x50mm R Magnum

 

5.6 x 52R (.22 Savage Hi-Power)

The 5.6×52mmR cartridge was created by Charles Newton and produced by Savage Arms in 1912. It is also known as the .22 Savage High-Power and .22 “Imp”, and is based upon the .25-35 Winchester cartridge necked down to accept a .227in/.228in diameter bullet. Its original loading was a 70 grain soft point bullet with a velocity of around 2700–2800 feet per second depending on the rifle.

5.6x57mm

The 5.6×57mm cartridge was created by RWS in Germany for hunting small deer such as roe deer, and for chamois. The calibre has a significant following among European sportsmen, and most European mass production riflemakers chamber several models of rifle for this cartridge. During the 1970-1990 period this cartridge was widely and successfully used in the Republic of Ireland for deer shooting, since security considerations at a period of Provisional Irish Republican Army violence had led to a ban on the civilian ownership of calibres larger than .224in. Some British small deer specialist hunters use the 5.6×57mm with great success on roe deer, muntjac and Chinese water deer.

With a factory-load velocity of 3,500 ft/s (1,100 m/s) with a 74-grain, cone-pointed bullet, it is approximately 100 ft/s (30 m/s) faster than the .220 Swift cartridge firing a bullet of equivalent weight. The larger case capacity means that handloaders can produce 50-grain loads that, with velocities in excess of 4,100 ft/s (1,200 m/s), will outpace anything that can safely be achieved by the Swift. The .223 Winchester Super Short Magnum is a 21st-century cartridge that is comparable to the 5.6×57mm. There are no dimensional or ballistic differences between the 5.6×57mm round and the 5.6×57mmR round, other than that the latter is rimmed.

The 5.6×57mm cartridge case has a distinctively thick case wall, and this causes significant problems when handloading, owing to the force that needs to be used through the press when re sizing the case neck. It has been suggested that this unusual neck thickness is the result of the use of .22 rimfire chamber adapters in centrefire rifles chambered for this cartridge.

5.6x57mm R

The 5.6×57mmR cartridge was created by Rheinisch-Westfälische Sprengstoffwerke (RWS) in Germany for hunting small deer. There are no dimensional or ballistic differences between the 5.6×57mmR round and the 5.6×57mm round (q.v.) other than that the former is rimmed.

5.6 x 61 SE (5.6 x 61 Vom Hofe Super Express)

 

5.6 x 61 R SE (5.6 x 61 R Vom Hofe Super Express)

 

MMJ 5.7mm

 

5.7x28mm

The FN 5.7×28mm is a small-caliber, high-velocity cartridge designed and manufactured by FN Herstal in Belgium.[7] It is a bottlenecked centerfire cartridge that is somewhat similar to the .22 Hornet or .22 K-Hornet.[7] Unlike many new cartridges, it has no parent case; the complete package was developed from scratch by FN. The 5.7×28mm was developed in conjunction with the FN P90 personal defense weapon (PDW) and FN Five-seven pistol, in response to NATO requests for a replacement for the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge.[10][11]

In 2002 and 2003, NATO conducted a series of tests with the intention of standardizing a PDW cartridge as a replacement for the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge.[11] The tests compared the relative merits of the 5.7×28mm cartridge and the 4.6×30mm cartridge, which was created by Heckler & Koch as a competitor to the 5.7×28mm.[11] The NATO group subsequently recommended the 5.7×28mm cartridge, citing superior performance in testing, but the German delegation objected and the standardization process was indefinitely halted.[11]

By 2006, FN’s 5.7×28mm firearms—the P90 personal defense weapon and Five-seven pistol—were in service with military and police forces in over 40 nations throughout the world.[12] In the United States, 5.7×28mm firearms are currently used by numerous law enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service.[13][14]

In addition to being used in the FN P90 and FN Five-seven firearms, the 5.7×28mm cartridge has subsequently been used in a number of other weapons, such as the AR-57 and FN PS90 carbines.[15][16] Excel Arms has developed four firearms chambered in 5.7×28mm, and MasterPiece Arms offers three different firearms in 5.7×28mm.[17][18] The 5.7×28mm cartridge itself is produced in a number of varieties, two of which—the SS195LF and SS197SR—are currently offered by FN to civilian shooters.[15]
5.8x42mm DBP87

The 5.8×42mm / DBP87 (“Dàn (弹) Bùqiāng (步枪) Pŭtòng (普通), 1987”; literally “Standard Rifle Cartridge, 1987”) is a military a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge developed in the People’s Republic of China. There is limited information on this cartridge, although the People’s Liberation Army says that it is superior to the 5.56×45mm NATO and 5.45×39mm Soviet cartridges. Another variant called the DBP88 “heavy round” was designed specifically for squad automatic weapons and designated marksman rifles. The 5.8×42mm “heavy round” cartridge has the same dimensions as the standard 5.8×42mm cartridge, but utilizes a longer streamlined bullet with a heavy steel core for increased performance at extended ranges and penetration. As of 2010 all 5.8×42mm cartridge variants are gradually succeeded by the DBP10 variant.
6mm – 7mm
6 x 35 mm
6mm Lee Navy

The 6mm Lee Navy (6×60mmSR), also known as the 6mm U.S.N.[1] or .236 Navy,[2] is an obsolete American rifle cartridge.[3] It was the service cartridge of the United States Navy and Marine Corps from 1895 (replacing the .45-70 Government round) to 1899, when it was replaced by the .30-40 Krag. It was the first small-bore high-velocity smokeless powder cartridge to be adopted by either service.[1]
6mmAR

The cartridge uses a 6.5 Grendel case that has been necked-down to accept a 6 mm (.243 in.) bullet.

The 6mm AR takes advantage of the wide variety of .243 in. caliber bullets. Slim, long bullets with high ballistic coefficient are ideal for energy retention at long ranges.[2]It is similar to the 6PDK which also uses a 6mm bullet and a similar muzzle energy and case capacity to the 6mm AR and 6.5 Grendel, in a casing somewhat popular[3] for the AR-15, a necked-down 6.8mm Remington SPC casing.
6 mm BR Remington

The 6mm BR is a centerfire cartridge created for benchrest shooting. The cartridge is also known as the 6mm Bench Rest or simply 6 BR, and has also developed a following among varmint hunters because of its efficiency.[2] There are two basic variants of very similar dimensions, known as the 6mm BR Remington and the 6mm Norma BR.
6 mm Musgrave

The 6mm Musgrave was the brain child of Ben Musgrave and introduced by Musgrave Rifles in 1955 and can be described as a classic Africa cartridge. It is based on necking down the .303 British with the original intent of it being a Springbok calibre for hunting on open plains in South Africa’s Karoo, Kalahari and Namakwaland. It is also well suited for other smaller antelope where longer shots have to be taken. Although not designed for bushveld conditions, the calibre can be downloaded to drive 100 grainers at 2500 feet per second and makes a very good cartridge for Impala and Reedbuck.

Like the .243 Winchester it has a fast rifle twist of 1-10 inches, however if 105 grain bullets are used it is recommended that a 1-9 or even faster twist is used to stabilise the bullets.

PMP (Pretoria Metal Pressings) is one of the very few ammunition manufacturers of 6mm Musgrave ammunition, but a lot of South African distributors have the ammunition in stock.

Dies for handloading are available from RCBS and Lee Precision.

Most manufactures of bullets (like Hornady, Nosler, Barnes, etc.) manufacture 6mm (.243″) bullets that are suitable for this chambering.
6mm TCU

The Thompson/Center Ugalde, or TCU family of wildcat cartridges, was developed by Wes Ugalde of Fallon, Nevada, by necking up .223 Remington brass to accept larger bullets. The cartridges were developed for the Thompson Center Arms Contender single shot pistol, and are widely used in handgun metallic silhouette competition and handgun hunting.[1]
6 mm PPC

The 6mm PPC (Palmisano & Pindel Cartridge), or 6 PPC as it is more often called, is a centerfire rifle cartridge used almost exclusively for benchrest shooting.[2] At distances out to 300 yards, it is one of the most accurate cartridges available.[3][4] This cartridge’s accuracy is produced by a combination of its stout posture, being only 1.23 inches (31 mm) long, and aggressive shoulder angle of 30 degrees compared to a 30-06’s 17 degrees.[5] Today it is commonly used for railgun shooting matches and has been since the 1980s
6mm-284
6x45mm A.K.A. (6mm-223 Remington)
6x47mm A.K.A. (6mm-222 Rem. Magnum)
6 mm Remington (.244 Remington)

The 6mm Remington rifle cartridge, originally introduced in 1955 by Remington Arms Company as the .244 Remington, is based on a necked down .257 Roberts cartridge using a .24/6mm bullet. Known for a combination of high velocity, long range, and accuracy, it is suitable as a dual use hunting cartridge for both varmints and medium-sized big game. When used in the less common earlier slow twist barrels, it offers exceptional range for varmint applications. While not as commercially popular today as it’s close cousin and competitor, the .243 Winchester, the 6mm Remington enjoys a slightly ballistic advantage and continues to be popular with handloaders and custom rifle builders.

6mm-250 A.K.A. (6mm International) Walker Version
6.5mm TCU

The Thompson/Center Ugalde, or TCU family of wildcat cartridges, was developed by Wes Ugalde of Fallon, Nevada, by necking up .223 Remington brass to accept larger bullets. The cartridges were developed for the Thompson Center Arms Contender single shot pistol, and are widely used in handgun metallic silhouette competition and handgun hunting.[1]
6.5 Creedmoor

The 6.5mm Creedmoor, also called the 6.5 Creedmoor or 6.5 CM for short, is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced by Hornady in 2007[6] as a modification of the .30 TC,[7] which was based on the .308 Winchester. It was designed specifically for rifle target shooting,[6] although it is also achieving success in game hunting.[7] Bullet for bullet, the 6.5mm Creedmoor achieves a slower muzzle velocity than longer cartridges such as the 6.5-284 Norma or magnum cartridges such as the 6.5mm Remington Magnum. However, due to its 2.825 inches (71.8 mm) overall length, it is capable of being chambered in short-action bolt action rifles and AR-10 semi-automatic rifles.
6.5 mm Grendel

The 6.5mm Grendel (6.5×39mm) is an intermediate cartridge designed by Arne Brennan, Bill Alexander, and Janne Pohjoispää as a low recoil, high accuracy, 200–800 yard cartridge specifically for the AR-15. It is an improved variation of the 6.5mm PPC.[4] Since its introduction, it has proven to be a versatile design and is now expanding out into other firearms including bolt-action rifles and the Kalashnikov system.[5]

The name “6.5mm Grendel” was a trademark owned by Alexander Arms until it was legally released to allow the cartridge to become SAAMI standardized.[6][7]
6.5 mm Remington Magnum

The 6.5mm Remington Magnum is a .264 caliber (6.7 mm) belted bottlenecked cartridge introduced in 1966.[1][2] The cartridge is based on a necked down .350 Remington Magnum which on turn is based on a shortened, necked down, blown out .375 H&H Magnum case.[3] The cartridge was one of the first short magnum cartridges.

6.5-06 A-Square

The 6.5-06 A-Square is a centerfire rifle cartridge that originated as a wildcat, based on the popular .30-06 Springfield. A-Square standardized the dimensions of the cartridge and submitted them to SAAMI in 1997.

6.5mm/06 A.K.A. 256/06
6.5-284 Norma

The 6.5-284 Norma originated as a wildcat cartridge based on the .284 Winchester cartridge necked down to 6.5 mm.
6mm/30-30 Improved
6.5x42mm Multi-Purpose Cartride (SSK Industries)
6.5x47mm Lapua

6.5×47mm Lapua (or 6.5×47mm) is a rifle cartridge that was developed specifically for 300–1000 meter competition by ammunition maker Nammo Lapua and the Swiss rifle manufacturer Grünig & Elmiger AG in

6.5x50mm Arisaka

The 6.5×50mm Semi-Rimmed (6.5×50mmSR) Japanese cartridge, currently manufactured under the designation 6.5mm Jap, was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army in 1897, along with the Type 30 Arisaka infantry rifle and carbine. The new rifle and cartridge replaced the 8×52mm Murata round used in the Type 22 Murata Rifle. In 1902 the Imperial Japanese Navy chambered its Type 35 rifle for the cartridge as well. In 1905, the round also came to be offered in the Type 38 Arisaka infantry rifle and carbine, both of which rendered the Type 30 obsolete in Imperial Army service. Type 44 cavalry carbines, first adopted in 1911, were also chambered in 6.5×50mm.

6.5x52mm Mannlicher-Carcano

The 6.5×52mm Carcano, also known as the 6.5×52mm Parravicini–Carcano or 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano, is an Italian military 6.5 mm (.268 cal, actually 0.2675 inches) rimless bottle-necked rifle cartridge, developed from 1889 to 1891 and used in the Carcano 1891 rifle and many of its successors. A common synonym in American gun literature is “6.5mm Italian.” In American parlance, “Carcano” is frequently added to better distinguish it from the rimmed hunting cartridge 6.5×52mmR (U.S. version: .25-35 Winchester). Ballistically, its performance is very similar to that of the 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer.

6.5 x 52R

The .25-35 Winchester, or WCF (Winchester Center Fire) was introduced in 1895 by Winchester for the Winchester Model 1894 lever action rifle. The case was based on the .30-30 cartridge.
6.5x53mmR Mannlicher

 

6.5x54mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

The 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer also known as 6.5×54 Mannlicher–Schönauer Greek is a 6.5 mm (.264″ cal.) rifle cartridge used in the Mannlicher–Schönauer rifle. 6.5 mm bullets are typically known for their high ballistic coefficients and sectional density, which gives them great stability in flight, resistance to wind deflection, and excellent penetration.

6.5x55mm (Also 6.5×55 Swedish Mauser, 6.5 x 55 Mauser)

The 6.5×55mm (designated as the 6.5×55 Swedish by the SAAMI[5] and 6,5 × 55 SE by the C.I.P.[6]) is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. Other, less common names are 6.5×55mm Swedish Mauser, 6.5×55mm Mauser and 6.5×55mm Krag. It was developed in 1891 for use in the new service rifles then under consideration by the United Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway.[7] The two nations had independent armies and consequently the normal procedure at the time was for their respective governments to use the same ammunition and then purchase small arms of their choice. Norway adopted the Krag–Jørgensen rifle, while Sweden adopted a Mauser rifle design.

The 6.5×55mm cartridge has a smaller bullet diameter and lower free recoil than other full-power service rifle cartridges like the .30-06 Springfield and 7.92×57mm Mauser, but thanks in part to its relatively roomy case with an uncommon 12.2 mm (0.480 in) diameter bolt face which was designed for loading long, heavy 6.5 mm bullets, has proven more successful than other first-generation smokeless-powder military cartridges of similar caliber such as the 6×60mm US Navy, 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer, 6.5×53mmR Dutch Mannlicher, 6.5×52mm Carcano and 6.5×50mm Arisaka.

6.5x57mm Mauser

 

6.5x68mm (also known as the 6.5 x 68 RWS, 6.5 x 68 Schüler or the 6.5 x 68 Von Hofe Express)

The 6.5×68mm rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire rifle cartridge (also known as the 6.5×68mm RWS, 6.5×68mm Schüler, or the 6.5×68mm Von Hofe Express) and its sister cartridge the 8×68mm S were developed in the 1930s by August Schüler from the August Schüler Waffenfabrik, Suhl, Germany as magnum hunting cartridges that would just fit and function in standard-sized Mauser 98 bolt-action rifles. This is one of the early examples where a completely new rifle cartridge (the 6.5×68mm and 8×68mm S have no other cartridge as parent case) was developed by a gunsmith to fit a specific popular and widespread type of rifle.

6.8 mm Remington SPC

The 6.8 mm Remington Special Purpose Cartridge (aka 6.8 SPC, 6.8 SPC II & 6.8×43mm) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge that was developed by Remington Arms in collaboration with members of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, United States Special Operations Command[5] to possibly replace the 5.56 NATO cartridge in a Short Barreled Rifle(SBR)/Carbine.

Based upon the .30 Remington cartridge,[6] it is midway between the 5.56×45mm NATO and 7.62×51mm NATO in bore diameter and muzzle energy. It uses the same diameter bullet (not usually the same weight) as the venerable .270 Winchester hunting cartridge.

7mm – 8mm
7mm Shooting Times Easterner (7mm STE)

 

7mm International Rimmed

 

7mm TCU A.K.A. (25 Ugalde)

 

7 mm BR Remington

The 7mm BR Remington, commonly called the 7mm BR or the 7mm Benchrest Remington in long form, was a cartridge developed by Remington for the Remington XP-100 single-shot bolt-action handgun. The cartridge was developed for the Unlimited Class in the sport of Metallic silhouette shooting. Later it was introduced in the Remington Model XB-40 single-shot bolt-action rifle, which was specifically designed for the benchrest shooting community.[1]

The 7mm BR is based on previous Remington benchrest cartridges 6mm BR Remington and the .22 BR Remington cartridges. These cartridges in turn trace their origin to .308 Winchester via the .308×1.5-inch Barnes cartridge. The 7mm BR was designed by merely necking up the pre-existing 6mm BR Remington to accept a .28 caliber (7 mm) bullet. The cartridge is capable of developing 2,200 ft/s (670 m/s) with a 139 gr (9.0 g) bullet or 2,100 ft/s (640 m/s) with a 154 gr (10.0 g) bullet in a 15 in (380 mm) barrel.[1]

As a hunting cartridge it is adequate for smaller deer species and ranges under 150 yd (140 m). With lighter bullets, this cartridge makes an excellent varmint or predator cartridge. The 7mm BR Remington, however, was conceived as a competitive handgun cartridge for Metallic Shooting.[1] It has enough energy and momentum to knock down targets out to 200 yd (180 m) and has had some success in that particular shooting discipline. Later it was also adopted in Benchrest shooting by Remington who introduced the X-40 rifle in that chambering.

At one time Remington produced ammunition and cases for this cartridge. They continued to supply the 7mm BR Remington case though to the early 1990s. Today the cartridge is considered obsolete and no one produces loaded ammunition and Remington no longer manufactures firearms chambered for this cartridge.[citation needed]

7mm IHMSA

 

7 mm Dakota

 

7 mm Gibbs

 

7 mm Remington Magnum

The 7mm Remington Magnum rifle cartridge was introduced as a commercially available round in 1962,[2] along with the new Remington Model 700 bolt-action rifle. It is a member of the belted magnum family that is directly derived from the venerable .375 H&H Magnum.[3][full citation needed] The original purpose of the belted magnum concept taken from the .300 H&H Magnum and .375 H&H Magnum, was to provide precise headspace control, since the sloping shoulders, while easing cartridge extraction, were unsuitable for this purpose. Improved cartridge extraction reliability is desirable while hunting dangerous game, which would be of concern when needing a fast follow up shot. The 7mm Remington Magnum is based on the commercial Winchester .264 Winchester Magnum, .338 Winchester Magnum, and .458 Winchester Magnum, which were based on the same belted .300 H&H Magnum and .375 H&H Magnum cases, trimmed to nearly the same length as the .270 Weatherby Magnum.[3]

On its introduction, the 7mm Remington Magnum substantially usurped the market share held by the .264 Winchester Magnum, which went into sharp decline in popularity and sales after 1962.[4] Remington has recently[when?] offered Managed Recoil ammunition for achieving reduced recoil when shooting and for generating less meat damage when hunting smaller game.

7 mm RSAUM (Remington Short-Action Ultra Mag)

 

7 mm Remington Ultra Magnum

The 7mm RUM was created using the .404 Jeffery case which was also used to develop the .375 RUM .300 RUM, and .338 RUM. By necking down the .300 RUM to suit the .284 or 7mm projectile,

Remington produced a non-belted case with a head diameter that is somewhat larger than belt diameter of original belted numbers. The resulting case has significantly more capacity than any conventional belted magnum. Compared to the 7mm Remington Magnum, top 7mm RUM loads deliver 25% more energy at 300 yards.[citation needed] Such performance demands a price and in this case, that is a large muzzle blast, sharp recoil and short barrel life.[1]

The 7mm Ultra Magnum boasts the largest case of any commercial 7mm cartridge.

7 mm STE (Shooting Times Easterner)

 

7 mm STW (Shooting Times Westerner)

The 7mm Shooting Times Westerner, sometimes referred to as the 7mm STW began as a wildcat rifle cartridge developed by Layne Simpson in 1979.[2] It is an 8mm Remington Magnum case that has been “necked down” (narrowing the case opening) by 1 mm to accept 7 mm (.284 in) bullets. This cartridge is named after the magazine Shooting Times where Layne Simpson is a regular contributor.

7 mm Weatherby Magnum

The 7 mm Weatherby Magnum is a powerful (magnum) 7 mm rifle cartridge offered by the Weatherby firearms company in their Mark V rifles. The cartridge was one of the first cartridges offered by the Weatherby company.[1]

It was developed in the 1940s by Roy Weatherby. The 7 mm Weatherby Magnum did not get a lot of exposure until the early part of the 1950s when the Weatherby rifles became more available. It is a great cartridge for a one-rifle hunter that shoots long distances. It has taken game of all sizes around the world.

7 mm WSM (Winchester Short Magnum)

Winchester Short Magnum, or WSM, refers to a family of rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire short magnum cartridges developed in the early 2000s by the U.S. Repeating Arms Company, the maker of Winchester rifles and one of the oldest firearms manufacturers in the United States. All of the WSM cartridges are based on the .404 Jeffery non-belted magnum cartridge which is shortened to fit a short rifle action (such as a .308 Winchester).

U.S. Repeating Arms Company used the same concept and the same base case in creating its even shorter Winchester Super Short Magnum cartridges, three of which were introduced in 2003 and 2004.

7mm-06 Mashburn

 

7mm-06

 

7 mm-08 Remington

The 7mm-08 Remington is a rifle cartridge that is almost a direct copy of a wildcat cartridge developed around 1958 known as the 7mm/308. As these names would suggest, it is the .308 Winchester case necked down to accept 7 mm (.284) bullets with a small increase in case length. Of cartridges based upon the .308, it is the second most popular behind only the .243 Winchester. However, the .308 is more popular than both.[1] In 1980, the Remington Arms company popularized the cartridge by applying its own name and offering it as a chambering for their Model 788 and Model 700 rifles.
7 mm-300 Weatherby Magnum

7-30 Waters

The 7-30 Waters cartridge was originally a wildcat cartridge developed by author Ken Waters in 1976 to give better performance to lever-action rifle shooters than the parent .30-30 Winchester cartridge, by providing a higher velocity and flatter trajectory with a smaller, lighter bullet. By 1984, Winchester introduced a Model 94 rifle chambered for the 7-30 Waters, establishing it as a commercial cartridge. In 1986, Thompson/Center began chambering 10-inch, 14-inch, and 20-inch Contender barrels for the cartridge.[1]

7.2 SLEC (7.2 SPECIAL LAW ENFORCEMENT CARTRIDGE)

 

7.21 Firebird

7.21 Tomahawk

7.44mm

 

7x33mm Sako

 

The 7×33mm Sako cartridge was created in Finland in 1942 as a small game cartridge for animals such as the Capercaillie and Black Grouse. It is based on a 9×19mm Parabellum case that has been lengthened and necked down to accept a 7.21mm bullet. The cartridge overall length is 44.30mm with a case length of 33.30mm and a base diameter of 10mm. The bottleneck bends at 26.50 mm (dia 9.50 mm) and straightens at 29.12 mm (dia 7.80mm). The Bertram company of Australia makes brass for it. Sako offers two loadings, a 78gr (5.1g) FMJ and a 78gr soft nose.[1]

Rifles chambered in this caliber include the Sako Models L42 and L46.

7×54mm Finnish

The 7×54mm Finnish is a rifle cartridge which was designed by Lapua as a moose hunting cartridge.[1] It was loaded by two factories, Sako and Lapua in Finland from about 1944 until 1974.[1] It is a 6.5×55mm SE necked up to take a 7mm (.285) bullet. It may be loaded with modified 6.5×55mm SE dies drilled to fit 8mm neck diameter. It was usually loaded with a lightweight bullet.

Dimensions were measured from a cartridge loaded by Lapua and from (if two measurements) a case that had been shot with an modified Arisaka. Because caliber is a wildcat, those can vary greatly. Rim diameter of the 6.5×55mm is 0.480″ (12.20 mm).[2]
7×54mm Fournier

Created by the gunsmith Jean Fournier, the 7x54mm Fournier is basically the 7.5x54mm French necked down to 7 mm. The cartridge was designed to be used with the Mas Fournier hunting rifle, which was itself a modification of the MAS-36 rifle.

Since the retirement and death of Jean Fournier, the fabrication of this cartridge has stopped. However, if some original ammos are still available for sale (mainly as collector), reloading dies and tables have been released since then.

7x57mm Mauser (.275 Rigby)

The 7×57mm cartridge, also known as the 7mm Mauser, 7×57mm Mauser, 7mm Spanish Mauser in the USA and .275 Rigby in the United Kingdom is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. It was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company in 1892 and adopted as a military cartridge by Spain in 1893.[2] It was subsequently adopted by several other countries as the standard military cartridge. It is recognised as a milestone in modern cartridge design, and although now obsolete as a military cartridge, it remains in widespread international use as a sporting round. The 7×57mm has been described as “a ballistician’s delight”.[citation needed] Many sporting rifles in this calibre were made by British riflemakers, among whom John Rigby was prominent; and, catering for the British preference for calibres to be designated in inches, Rigby called this chambering the .275 bore after the measurement of a 7 mm rifle’s bore across the lands.[2]
7x61mm Sharpe & Hart

The 7x61mm Sharpe & Hart Magnum belted cartridge (7mm S&H Super) was developed by Philip B. Sharpe and Richard (Dick) Hart in the 1950s and based on the .300 H&H Magnum case. In 1953 Sharpe travelled to Scandinavia and the outcome of this trip was that Schultz & Larsen of Denmark chambered the cartridge in their bolt action rifles. One example being the model 54J, which featured rear locking lugs and a fully enclosed bolt face. while Norma started to manufacture commercial ammunition according to the designers specifications. But today the cartridge requires hand-loading. However hand-loaders have a variety of bullets to choose from, and Hornady lists load data for the cartridge. Brass is still available, or can be fire-formed from 7mm Remington Magnum cases.

7x64mm Brenneke

The 7×64mm (also unofficially known as the 7×64mm Brenneke, though its designer’s name officially never was added as a part of this cartridge name) is a rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed for hunting. As is customary in European cartridges the 7 denotes the 7 mm bullet caliber and the 64 denotes the 64 mm (2.5 in) case length. The 7×64mm is a popular hunting cartridge in Central Europe and can, due to its 11.95 mm (0.470 in) case head diameter and 84 mm (3.3 in) overall length, easily be chambered in Mauser 98 bolt action rifles that were then standard issue in the German military.

7x65mm R Brenneke

 

7x66mm Super Express vom Hofe

7×72 Rimmed

7x75mm R Super Express vom Hofe

7.35x51mm Carcano

After reports of inadequate performance of the 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano at both short and long ranges[1][2] during the campaigns in Italian North Africa (1924-1934), and the Second Italo-Abyssinian War (1935/36), the Italian army introduced a new short rifle in 1938, the Modello 1938, together with a new cartridge in 7.35x51mm caliber. In addition to the slightly larger caliber, Italian ordnance designers introduced a spitzer-type bullet for the new cartridge, with the tip filled with aluminum to produce an unstable (tumbling) projectile upon impact in soft tissue (a design most likely copied from the .303 British Mk VII bullet). Although the intention was to create a more powerful and precise rifle cartridge, the decision to adopt a lighter bullet than in the 6.5 mm Carcano,[3] and various design problems of the 91/38 rifle, did not permit the cartridge to achieve the intended success.
7.5x55mm Schmidt Rubin

The 7.5×55mm Swiss or GP 11 (or unofficially 7.5×55mm Schmidt–Rubin) is a cartridge developed for the Swiss Army by Lt. Col. Eduard Rubin for rifles based on Rudolf Schmidt’s action design. The ammunition used by the Schmidt–Rubin Model 1889 rifle was one of the first to use 7.5 mm copper-jacketed rounds similar to those used today. The GP90 7.5×53.5mm round designed by Colonel Rubin was revolutionary in that the most popular military calibres used in Europe at the time were around 10 to 14 mm as opposed to 7.5 mm of the Schmidt–Rubin ammunition.

7.5x57mm MAS mod. 1924 7.5x54mm MAS mod. 1929

The obsolete 8mm “Lebel” round was powerful and accurate but due to its shape it was particularly poorly suited to automatic weapons with large-capacity magazines.[1] The only weapon ever fielded in 7.5 mm MAS mod. 1924 was the fusil-mitrailleur mle 1924, an automatic rifle sharing similarities with the B.A.R and Bren. Early examples of the FM 24 proved prone to various failures; additionally, it was possible to mistake the new 7.5×57mm for a German 7.92×57mm Mauser round. The new 7.5 mm round was abandoned and replaced by the 7.5×54mm MAS mod. 1929.[2]

7.62 mm caliber

7.62 mm caliber is a nominal caliber used for a number of different cartridges. Historically, this class of cartridge was commonly known as .30 caliber, the Imperial unit equivalent, and was most commonly used for indicating a class of full power military main battle rifle (MBR) cartridges. The measurement equals 0.30 inches or 3 decimal lines, written .3″ and read as Three-Line.[1]

7.62 mm refers to the internal diameter of the barrel at the lands (the raised helical ridges in rifled gun barrels). The actual bullet caliber is normally 7.82 mm (.308 in), although Soviet weapons commonly use a 7.91 mm (.311 in) bullet, as do older British (.303 British) and Japanese cartridges.

7.62x25mm Tokarev

The 7.62×25mm Tokarev cartridge (designated as the 7,62 × 25 Tokarev by the C.I.P.[5]) is a Russian rimless bottlenecked pistol cartridge widely used in former Soviet satellite states, China and Pakistan among other countries. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9×18mm Makarov in Russian service.[6]
7.62x38mmR

7.62×38mmR (also known as 7.62 mm Nagant and Cartridge, Type R) is a unique ammunition cartridge designed for use in the Russian Nagant M1895 revolver.

A small number of experimental submachine guns (e.g., Tokarev 1927), designed by Fedor Tokarev, were also produced in a 7.62 mm Nagant chambering.[1] None, however, were accepted into Soviet service.[2][3]
7.62×35mm

300 AAC Blackout, SAAMI short name 300 BLK, also known as 7.62×35mm is a rifle cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. Its purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacity. Care should be taken not to use 300 BLK ammunition in a rifle chambered for .223/5.56 or 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical.[1]

7.62x39mm

The 7.62×39mm (aka 7.62 Soviet) round is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge of Soviet origin that was designed during World War II. Due to the worldwide proliferation of RPD and RPK light machine guns and SKS and AK-47 pattern rifles, the cartridge is used by both militaries and civilians alike. 7.62×39mm ammunition is purportedly tested to function well in temperatures ranging from −50 to 50 °C (−58 to 122 °F) cementing its usefulness in cold polar or hot desert conditions.

The 7.62×39mm cartridge was influenced by a variety of foreign developments, including the German Mkb 42(H) and the U.S. M1 carbine.[3]

Shortly after World War II, the world’s most widespread military-pattern rifle was designed for this cartridge: the AK-47. The cartridge remained the Soviet standard until the 1970s. It was largely replaced in Russian service by the 5.45×39mm cartridge, which is used by the current-issue AK-74M service rifle and its variants. In the 21st century the 7.62×39mm remains a common service rifle chambering, including for newly developed rifles.

7.62×40 Wilson Tactical

The 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical (7.62×40mm WT) is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced in 2011 by Wilson Combat. The goal was to produce an accurate, low-recoil .30-caliber hunting cartridge that could be used in an AR-15-type rifle using as many standard components as possible.

7.62x45mm vz. 52

The 7.62×45mm (designated as the 7,62 × 45 by the C.I.P.)[2] is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge developed in Czechoslovakia. It is fired by the Czech vz. 52 rifle, Vz. 52 machine gun and ZB-530 light machine gun. The round was later dropped from use when the Czech converted to the standard Warsaw Pact round, the 7.62×39mm (fired by vz. 52/57 rifle and vz. 52/57 light machine gun). Its muzzle velocity and muzzle energy are slightly higher than that of the 7.62×39mm cartridge.

7.62×51mm NATO

300 AAC Blackout, SAAMI short name 300 BLK, also known as 7.62×35mm is a rifle cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. Its purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacity. Care should be taken not to use 300 BLK ammunition in a rifle chambered for .223/5.56 or 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical.[1]

7.62x53mm Rimmed

 

7.62 x 54R (rimmed) (7.62 Russian)

The 7.62×54mmR (aka 7.62 Russian) is a rimmed rifle cartridge developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the bolt-action Mosin–Nagant rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet period to the present day. The cartridge remains one of the few standard-issue rimmed cartridges still in military use and has the longest service life of all military-issued cartridges in the world.[4]

The American Winchester Model 1895 was also chambered for this cartridge per a contract with the Russian government. The 7.62×54mmR is still in use by the Russian military in the Dragunov and other sniper rifles, as well as some modern general-purpose machine guns like the PKM and Pecheneg machine gun. Originally, the round was designated as “Трехлинейный патрон образца 1891 года” – (Three-line cartridge model of 1891). It then became widely known under the designation “7,62мм винтовочный патрон” (7.62mm rifle cartridge). The round has erroneously come to be known as the “7.62mm Russian” (and is still often referred to as such colloquially), but, according to standards, the “R” in designation (7.62×54mmR) stands for Rimmed, in line with standard C.I.P. designations. The name is sometimes confused with the “7.62 Soviet” round, which refers to the rimless 7.62×39mm cartridge used in the SKS and AK-based (AK-47, AK-15, AEK-973) rifles.

7.63x25mm Mauser

The 7.63×25mm Mauser (.30 Mauser Automatic) round was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case.[1] It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in Soviet and Eastern Bloc weapons.
7.65x22mm Parabellum

The 7.65×21mm Parabellum (designated as the 7,65 Parabellum by the C.I.P.[2] and also known as .30 Luger and 7.65mm Luger) is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for their new Pistol Parabellum. The primary designers were firearms designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65×25mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65x53mm Argentine (7.65x53mm Mauser)

The 7.65×53mm Mauser (designated as the 7,65 × 53 Arg. by the C.I.P.)[2] is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge developed for use in the Mauser Model 1889 rifle by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company. It is also known as 7.65×53mm Argentine, 7.65×53mm Argentine rimless, 7.65mm Argentine, 7.65×53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65mm Belgian (in the United States) and 7.65×53mm Mauser (in Belgium).

The 7.65×53mmR is a rimmed variant of the 7.65×53mm Mauser cartridge.[citation needed] Ballistically it is comparable to the also-rimmed .303 British cartridge.[citation needed]

7.65x53mmR

 

7.63x54mm Greek Mannlicher-Schoenauer

 

7.7x58mm Arisaka

The 7.7×58mm Arisaka cartridge, Type 99 rimless 7.7 mm or 7.7mm Japanese was a rifle cartridge which was used in the Imperial Japanese Army’s Arisaka Type 99 Rifle and machine guns, and was the standard light cartridge for the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service, such as the Type 89. The Imperial Japanese Navy (and her Air Service) never shared weapons or ammunition with the Army, instead adopting the 7.7x56mmR, a direct copy of the .303 British round. The cartridge was designed to replace the aging 6.5×50mm Arisaka cartridge after seeing the effectiveness of the 8×57 IS heavy machine gun in action in China during 1937.[2] Due to lack of materials the plan to phase out the 6.5 mm Arisaka cartridge by the end of the war was not completed.

7.8 SLEC (( 7.8 SPECIAL LAW ENFORCEMENT CARTRIDGE))

7.82 Patriot

7.82 Warbird

7.92x33mm Kurz

The 7.92×33mm Kurz (designated as the 7.92 x 33 kurz by the C.I.P.)[4][5][6][7][8] is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge developed in Nazi Germany prior to and during World War II. The ammunition is also referred to as 7.9mm Kurz (German: Kurz meaning short), 7.9 Kurz, or 7.9mmK, or 8×33 Polte. It was specifically intended for development of an automatic carbine (assault rifle). The round was developed as a compromise between the longer 7.92×57mm rifle and the 9×19mm Parabellum pistol rounds, and is known as an intermediate cartridge (German: Mittelpatrone).

7.92x36mm EPK

The 7.92×36mm EPK was an experimental rifle round intended for the Pyrkal light machine gun. The round is essentially a 6.5mm Mannlicher round necked up to chamber a 7.92 mm bullet.

7.92x57mm Mauser (8 mm Mauser or 8×57 JS)

The 7.92×57mm Mauser (designated as the 8mm Mauser or 8×57mm by the SAAMI [2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was adopted by the German Empire in 1903/1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.

8mm – 9mm
8 mm-06

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

8mm Mauser

The 7.92×57mm Mauser (designated as the 8mm Mauser or 8×57mm by the SAAMI [2] and 8 × 57 IS by the C.I.P.[3]) is a rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge. The 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was adopted by the German Empire in 1903/1905, and was the German service cartridge in both World Wars. In its day, the 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge was one of the world’s most popular military cartridges. In the 21st century it is still a popular sport and hunting cartridge that is factory-produced in Europe and the United States.

8 mm Lebel or 8x50R Lebel

The 8×50mmR Lebel (8mm Lebel) (designated as the 8 × 51 R Lebel by the C.I.P.[1]) rifle cartridge was the first smokeless powder cartridge to be made and adopted by any country. It was introduced by France in 1886. Formed by necking down the 11mm Gras black powder cartridge, the smokeless 8 mm Lebel cartridge started a revolution in military rifle ammunition. Standard 8mm Lebel military ammunition was also the first rifle ammunition to feature a spitzer boat tail bullet (Balle D), which was adopted in 1898.[3] The long-range ballistic performance of the 8mm Lebel bullet itself was exceptional. For use in the magazine tube-fed early Lebel rifle, the 8mm case was designed to protect against accidental percussion inside the tube magazine by a circular groove around the primer cup which caught the tip of the following pointed bullet. However, the shape of its rimmed bottle-necked case, having been designed for the Lebel rifle’s tube magazine, also precluded truly efficient vertical stacking inside a vertical magazine. The bolt thrust of the 8mm Lebel is relatively high compared to many other service rounds used in the early 20th century. Although it was once revolutionary, the 8mm Lebel was declared obsolete after World War I and was soon after replaced with the 7.5×54mm French round.

8 mm Remington Magnum

The 8mm Remington Magnum belted rifle cartridge was introduced by Remington Arms Company in 1978 as a new chambering for the model 700 BDL rifle. The 8mm Remington Magnum’s parent case is the .375 H&H Magnum. It is a very long and powerful cartridge that cannot be used in standard length actions, such as those that accommodate the .30-06 Springfield.[3]

8x35mm

8x50mmR Mannlicher

The Austro-Hungarian 8×50mmR Mannlicher or 8×50mmR M93 is a cartridge dating back to the days of semi-smokeless powder.

8x56mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

 

8x56mmR Steyr or Hungarian

The 8×56mmR or 8×56mmR M30S (C.I.P. civil designation) cartridge was adopted in the year 1930 by Austria, in 1931 by the Kingdom of Hungary and in 1934 by the Kingdom of Bulgaria as a replacement for the 8×50mmR Mannlicher cartridge.

8x58mm RD (rimmed danish)

8x60mm S

The 8×60mm S (the S means it is intended for 8.2 mm (.323 in) groove diameter bullets) is an uncommon rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge of German origin, dating back to the interbellum period between World War I and World War II. As is customary in European cartridges the 8 denotes the 8 mm bullet caliber and the 60 denotes the 60 mm (2.362 in) case length. The 8×60mm S can, due to its 83.6 mm (3.291 in) overall length, easily be chambered in standard sized Mauser 98 bolt action rifles.

8x64mm S Brenneke

The 8×64mm S (also unofficially known as the 8×64mm S Brenneke) (the S means it is intended for 8.2 mm (.323 in) groove diameter bullets) is a rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed as a military service round for the German Army who never issued it. As is customary in European cartridges the 8 denotes the 8 mm bullet caliber and the 64 denotes the 64 mm (2.52 in) case length.

The 8×64mm is a hunting cartridge in central Europe and can due to its 87.5 mm (3.445 in) maximal overall length fairly easily be chambered in standard sized military Mauser 98 bolt action rifles. In such military M98 bolt actions the magazine boxes, however, have to be adapted by a competent gunsmith to function properly with the 8×64mm S cartridge, since the M98 internal magazine boxes feature an internal magazine length of 84 mm (3.31 in).

8x68mm S

The 8×68mm S rebated rim bottlenecked centerfire rifle cartridge (the S denoting it is intended for 8.2 mm (.323 in) groove diameter bullets) and its necked-down sister cartridge, the 6.5×68mm (no S, or other modifier required), were developed in the 1930s by August Schüler of the August Schüler Waffenfabrik, Suhl, Germany as magnum hunting cartridges that would just fit and function in standard-sized Mauser 98 bolt-action rifles. This is one of the early examples where a completely new rifle cartridge (the 8×68mm S and 6.5×68mm have no other cartridge as parent case) was developed by a gunsmith to fit a specific popular and widespread type of rifle.

9mm and larger

9x39mm

The 9×39mm is a Soviet / Russian rifle cartridge.[1]

9x45mm

 

9x53mm

The Soviet 9×53mmR rifle cartridge was designed for hunting in the USSR. It is a 7.62×54mmR necked up to accommodate a larger bullet.[5] Two bullet types are available:[6]

9x56mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer

9x57mm Mauser

The 9×57mm Mauser is a cartridge based on the 7.92×57mm Mauser. It uses the identical 57 mm-long cartridge case, with the same shoulder angle, but necked up to accept a 9 mm-diameter bullet. Ballistically – but not dimensionally – it is indistinguishable from the 9×56mm Mannlicher–Schoenauer. It is currently regarded as a semi-obsolete calibre, although hand-loading keeps it alive.
9.3x57mm

9.3 x 57mm Mauser was created by necking up the 7.92 x 57mm Mauser cartridge. The 9.3×57mm (bullet diameter .365 in.), introduced in 1900, is closely related to the 9×57mm Mauser, even though some dimensions of the cartridge case are slightly different. The 9.3×57mm is still fairly popular among moose hunters in Scandinavia (among hunters in Sweden it is affectionately known as “potatiskastaren”, the spud gun, because of the slow and heavy bullet). Factory loaded ammunition with 232 grains (15.0 g) and 285 grains (18.5 g) bullets is available from Norma of Sweden. The 9.3×57mm Norma factory load with a 232 grains (15.0 g) bullet has a muzzle velocity of 2,362 feet per second (720 m/s) for 2,875 foot-pounds force (3,898 J) of energy, which makes it 10-20% more powerful than the 9×57mm.[1]

9.3x62mm

The 9.3×62mm (also known in the USA as the 9.3×62mm Mauser) is an ‘all-around firearms cartridge’ suitable for hunting larger species of animals in Africa, Europe, or North America. It was introduced by Otto Bock in 1905. At a typical 720.0 m/s (2,362 ft/s), its 286 grain standard load balances recoil and power for effective use at up to about 250m (275 yds). The CIP Maximum Average Pressure (MAP) for the 9.3×62mm is 390 MPa (56,500 PSI). [2]

The 9.3×62mm was developed around 1905 by Berlin gunmaker Otto Bock, who designed it to fit into the Model 1898 Mauser bolt-action rifle. [2] African hunters and settlers often chose military rifles for their reliability and low cost, but governments fearful of colonial rebellions often banned military-caliber bolt-action magazine rifles and their ammunition. The 9.3×62mm was never a military cartridge and so never had this problem. Mausers in 9.3×62mm were inexpensive and reliable, too, so their popularity in Africa grew quickly and became widespread.

The 9.3×74R is a rimmed 9.3 mm cartridge that evolved from the 9.3×72R black powder cartridge. The energy levels of the 9.3×62 and 9.3×74R cartridges are similar but in developmental terms are distinct as the cartridges are unrelated. The rimmed cartridge is slightly longer, allowing for lower pressure in the case while retaining muzzle velocity.

9.3x64mm Brenneke

The 9.3×64mm Brenneke (also unofficially known as the 9.3 x 64) is a rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed for big-game hunting. The 9.3 denotes the 9.3 mm bullet diameter and the 64 denotes the 64 mm case length. Using the bullet diameter is unusual in German cartridge designations. Normally the approximate land diameter of the barrel is used for such designations.

The 9.3×64mm Brenneke can be chambered in standard-sized Mauser 98 bolt-action rifles. The M 98 bolt actions and magazine boxes of standard military Mauser 98 rifles, however, have to be adapted by a competent gunsmith to function properly with these magnum cartridges since their cases are longer and have a larger diameter than the 8×57mm IS service cartridges.

9.3x65Rmm Brenneke

 

9.3x65mm Collath

 

9.3x66mm Sako

 

9.3x72mmD

9.3x74mmR

9.3×74mmR is a European medium-bore cartridge invented in Germany around 1900.[1]

9.5x57mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer (.375 Rimless Nitro Express x 2-1/4″)

The 9.5×57mm Mannlicher–Schönauer (MS) cartridge was adopted for the M-1910 MS rifle and carbine in 1910.[2] (Note: The word Schoenauer is often spelled Schönauer with an “umlaut” over the “o”). The 9.5×57mm MS is also known as the 9.5×56mm MS, the 9.5×56.7mm MS, and the .375 Rimless Nitro Express (RNE) × 2¼ (primarily in England). The cartridge may have been created by Westley-Richards and Eley in 1908 (rather than by the Oestereichischer Waffenfabrik-Gessellschaft, Steyr (OWS) (Austrian Arms Manufacturer-Association, Steyr)), but no production rifles in this caliber have been found prior to the M-1910. This development by or on behalf of Steyr was probably an answer to the development by the noted British gunmaking firm of Holland & Holland in 1905 of their .400/.375 Rimless Belted Nitro Express, designed for their specially modified Mannlicher–Schoenauer rifle (they imported the actions from Austria, but built the rifles in house). Whether the development of the 9.5×57mm Mannlicher–Schoenauer cartridge originated with OWS or with Holland’s British competitor, Westley Richards certainly was the principal promoter of the new 1910 Model Mannlicher–Schoenauer rifle as evidenced by catalogs of the time. The 9.5×57mm MS is the last pre-war proprietary cartridge by Steyr and their most powerful until the recent advent of the .376 Steyr, which has its antecedents in the 9.5×57mm.[citation needed]

 

10.75x57mm

 

10.75x68mm

 

10.75x73mm

The .404 Jeffery is a large-caliber, rimless cartridge[4] designed for large, dangerous game, such as the “Big Five” (elephant, rhino, cape buffalo, lion and leopard) of Africa. Other names for this cartridge include .404 Jeffery Rimless, .404 Rimless Nitro Express, and 10.75× 73mm. It was created by W.J. Jeffery & Co of England based on their desire to duplicate performance of the .450/400 (3¼”) cartridge.[5] There are two basically similar sets of dimensions for this case, depending on the manufacturer.[6] The .404 Jeffery as originally loaded fired a .423″ diameter bullet of either 300 gr (19 g) with a muzzle velocity of 2,600 ft/s (790 m/s) and muzzle energy of 4,500 foot-pounds force (6,100 N·m) or 400 gr (26 g) with a muzzle velocity of 2,125 ft/s (648 m/s) and 4,020 foot-pounds force (5,450 N·m) of energy.[7] It is very effective on large game and is favored by many hunters of dangerous game. Performance and recoil are similar to other African dangerous game cartridges. The .404 Jeffery was popular with hunters and game wardens in Africa because it gave good performance with a manageable level of recoil. By way of comparison, the .416 Rigby and .416 Remington Magnum both fire a 400 grain .416 in bullet at 2,400 feet per second (730 m/s) with a muzzle energy of approximately 5,000 foot-pounds force (6,800 N·m), which handily exceeds the ballistic performance of the .404 Jeffery but at the price of greater recoil and, in the case of the .416 Rigby, rifles that are significantly more expensive.

11x60mm Mauser

The 11mm Mauser (also known as the 11x60mmR Mauser or .43 Mauser) was a black-powder cartridge developed for the Mauser Model 1871 rifle, and used later in the 71/84 variant. It is no longer in production, however it is available from custom loaders and handloading can be done to replenish spent ammunition.

12.7mm British No. 2

The .577/500 No 2 Black Powder Express, also known as the 12.7mm British No 2, is a British centerfire fire rifle cartridge.

12.7x99mm NATO (Multi-Purpose)

The .50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG, 12.7×99mm NATO and designated as the 50 Browning by the C.I.P.[1]) is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s. Entering service officially in 1921, the round is based on a greatly scaled-up .30-06 cartridge. Under STANAG 4383, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries. The cartridge itself has been made in many variants: multiple generations of regular ball, tracer, armor-piercing (AP), incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds. The rounds intended for machine guns are linked using metallic links.

The .50 BMG cartridge is also used in long-range target and anti-materiel rifles, as well as other .50-caliber machine guns.

A wide variety of ammunition is available, and the availability of match grade ammunition has increased the usefulness of .50 caliber rifles by allowing more accurate fire than lower quality rounds.[3]

12.7x54mm (subsonic)

The 12.7×55mm Subsonic cartridge is used in the VKS bullpup sniper rifle. The cartridge can carry a projectile weighing between from 59 grams (911 grains) and 76 g (1173 gr), yielding massive amounts of kinetic energy. The round can penetrate up to 16 mm (0.63 in) of steel at 200 meters or heavy body armor at 100 meters. The accuracy of this cartridge is claimed as to be 1 MOA at 100 meters range.[2]

12.7x108mm

The 12.7×108mm cartridge is a heavy machine gun and anti-materiel rifle cartridge used by the former Soviet Union, the former Warsaw Pact, modern Russia, and other countries.

It is used in the same roles as the NATO .50 BMG (12.7×99mm NATO) cartridge. The two differ in bullet shape and weight, and the casing of the 12.7×108mm is slightly longer, but smaller muzzle velocity, allowing it to hold slightly more of a different type of powder. The 12.7×108mm can be used to engage a wide variety of targets on the battlefield, and will destroy unarmored vehicles, penetrate lightly armored vehicles and damage external ancillary equipment (i.e.: searchlights, radar, transmitters, vision blocks, engine compartment covers) on heavily armored vehicles such as tanks.[1] Armor-piercing .50 cal ammunition will penetrate around 25 mm of armor. Normal full metal jacket .50 cal ammunition will only dimple tank armor, causing no damage.

13x64B

13.2x92mm

 

The Mauser 13.2mm TuF (German: Tank und Flieger; lit. “Tank and Aircraft”, known also as 13.2×92mmSR), was a major step in the development of anti-tank cartridges, being the first cartridge designed for the sole purpose of destroying armored targets.

14.5x114mm

The 14.5×114mm (.57 Cal) is a heavy machine gun and anti-materiel rifle cartridge used by the Soviet Union, the former Warsaw Pact, modern Russia, and other countries.

It was originally developed for the PTRS and PTRD anti-tank rifles, but was later used as the basis for the KPV heavy machine gun that formed the basis of the ZPU series anti-aircraft guns that is also the main armament of the BTR series of armoured personnel carriers from the BTR-60 to the BTR-80.

14.5 mm JDJ

It uses the .50 BMG case with the neck opened up to accept a .585 in (14.9 mm) bullet. It fires the 1,173-grain (76.0 g) bullet at 2,700 ft/s (820 m/s) with the fire-formed load. The Barnes 750-grain (49 g) bullet can also be loaded to 3,000 ft/s (910 m/s). It has a destructive device exemption. Only rifles chambered for the .50 BMG can be converted to this caliber.

15.2 mm Steyr Armor Piercing Fin Stabilized Discarding Sabot (APFSDS)

 

20 mm caliber

The 20 mm caliber is a specific size of cannon or autocannon ammunition.

There are few weapons (aside from shotguns, large game hunting rifles, and heavy caliber muzzleloading “rampart” or “wall guns” popular in the early mid 19th century European militaries[1]) which have been built that fire projectiles between 12.7mm (such as the 12.7mm NATO) and 20 mm caliber, though there were several 13 mm heavy machine guns used during World War II, such as

the MG 131; the 14.5 mm caliber is still used by some Soviet machine guns such as the KPV and anti-tank rifles such as PTRS, PTRD, and NTW-20.

Since 20mm is the cutoff point where most nations switch from bullets to shells, it has come to also generally be the cutoff point between weapons classified as a machine gun or a cannon. This can vary, however: for example, in World War II, Japan classified any weapon over 11 mm as a cannon; thus, in Japanese records, their 12.7 mm Ho-103 aircraft gun is classified as an autocannon, as it used explosive shells to overcome its lower muzzle velocity compared to American 12.7mm/.50BMG weapons. A machine gun does not fire shells, so historically a weapon that fires shells below 20 mm can be a cannon. A true definition will always mention whether the weapon fires bullets or shells in addition to its caliber.

A very small number of anti-tank rifles have been produced in 20 mm and larger calibers.

20 mm caliber cartridges have an outside bullet diameter and inside barrel diameter of 0.787 inches (20.0 mm). Projectiles or bullets are typically 75 to 127 mm (3–5 in) long. Cartridge cases are typically 75 to 152 mm (3–6 in) long. Many but not all 20 mm rounds have an explosive filling and detonating fuze.

As an example, the RT-20 (rifle) fires a 20×110mm 130-gram[2] projectile at a muzzle velocity of 850 m/s.[3] For a simple slug this gives a muzzle energy of 47 kilojoules.

20×110 mm USN

The 20×110mm USN (also known as 20×110mm US Navy and 20mm Mk-100 Series) was developed by the US Navy after World War II for use in Mk 11 and Mk 12 autocannon. They are called the Mk 100 series as they range from Mk 101 to Mk 109.

It has the same rim diameter as the 20×102mm but a different length and contour. It is not interchangeable with any other 20×110mm cartridge.[1]

23×115 mm

The 23×115mm round is used by Soviet (USSR)/Russian/CIS aircraft autocannon, most notably by the GSh-23L and GSh-6-23. Although the round has been superseded by the 30×165mm round, the Russian Air Force still uses it in the GSh-23L (in aircraft’s tail turrets and in the UPK-23-250 gunpack/gunpod) and GSh-6-23 (used in Su-24). This round still serves in many countries and is widely available.

23×152 mm

The 23×152mmB used by the USSR/CIS in the VYa-23 aircraft autocannon the Ilyushin Il-2 ground attack aircraft and in the 2A7 and 2A14 autocannons on the ZU-23 anti-aircraft gun series and ZSU-23-4 “Shilka”, among others. Note that the ammunition for the VYa-23 uses a brass case and is not functionally interchangeable with the steel-cased ammunition of the modern ZU-23 anti-aircraft gun series. These two weapon systems use different headspace sizes, therefore requiring ammunition of slightly different dimensions. While it is no longer in use in the main anti-aircraft weapons of modern Russia, being replaced by the 30×165mm, it is still in service with the Russian Naval Infantry and many other countries.

25x137mm

The 25 mm caliber is a specific size of cannon or autocannon ammunition. It has also been recently used for the anti-materiel rifle. Such ammunition includes the NATO-standard 25×137mm and 25×184mm rounds, as well as the World War II-era French-designed 25×163mm and 25×193.5mmR rounds.

30x165mm

The 30 mm caliber is a specific size of autocannon ammunition. Such ammunition includes NATO standard 30×173mm and 30×113mmB rounds and Soviet 30×165mm rounds which are widely used around the world.
30x173mm

The 30 mm caliber is a specific size of autocannon ammunition. Such ammunition includes NATO standard 30×173mm and 30×113mmB rounds and Soviet 30×165mm rounds which are widely used around the world.

Wildcats – Obscure – Proprietary

Inches
.14 Walker Hornet

 

.14/221

.14-222

The .14-222 is a wildcat cartridge that was created in 1985 by Helmut W. Sakschek. It uses a .222 Remington case necked down to accept a .14 caliber bullet.

.17 Ackley Bee

The .17 Ackley Bee is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge named after its designer, P.O. Ackley, and is a .218 Bee case necked down to .17 caliber with a squarer shoulder and less body taper. Being a rimmed case it was popular with single shot rifles such as the Martini Cadet and Low Wall Winchester.[2] The caliber is well suited to varmint hunting particularly where minimal pelt damage is required.[citation needed]

.17 CCM

 

The .17 CCM (Cooper Centerfire Magnum) is a cartridge. It is a necked down[further explanation needed] version of the .22 CCM. This[which?] cartridge was introduced in 1992 and was originally designed by Mike Hill. Dan Cooper (President of Cooper Arms) further refined the cartridge and chambering to put it into production in the Cooper Model 38 action.

The .17 CCM is designed specifically for varmint and small game hunting. Its major benefits are low noise, accuracy and minimal barrel temperature, which makes it a perfect cartridge for prairie dogs. It has an effective range of around 300 yards, but like any other .17 caliber it is sensitive to the wind out past 100 yards.

.17 Hornet

The .17 Hornet is a .17 caliber centerfire rifle cartridge originally offered as a “wildcat cartridge” made by P.O. Ackley in the early 1950s. He created this non-factory (wildcat) offering by simply necking-down the .22 Hornet to .17 caliber and fire-forming the resized cases in his new chamber design. The result was a small quiet cartridge capable of high velocity. Ackley mentions it as one of the most balanced of the .17 cartridges of his time; likely, this is still true.[1]

Sixty years later, Hornady Manufacturing Company (Grand Island, Nebraska, USA) has taken Ackley’s idea into a commercial product with a similar cartridge; the 17 Hornady Hornet uses a 20 grain (1.3 gram) “Superformance” V-max projectile at a published velocity of 3650fps (1113 metre/second). [2]

However, the new standardized ammunition/brass is not built to exactly the same dimensional specifications as the original wildcat or the dimensions listed on this page. Hornady’s standard has a shorter body with less taper and shorter overall case length while the overall loaded length remains that of the original .22 Hornet (in order to fit the standard Hornet Magazines). Shooters wishing to use the .17 Hornady Hornet in a .17 Ackley Hornet chamber will experience the bullet jumping to the rifling and may lose some of the inherent accuracy for which the cartridge has been known.

It has been reported the .17 Hornady Hornet uses a thicker rim than the original Hornet case. However, the 9th Edition of the Hornady “Handbook of Cartridge Reloading” shows them to be the same (.065 inches); measuring the rims of actual factory cases shows the Hornady Handbook to be correct. Moreover, Ackley’s “Pocket Manual for Shooters and Reloaders” shows the rim thickness for his wildcat to range between .069″ and .063″ which is consistent with the Hornady Handbook. Both cartridges head-space on this rim.

While the Ackley cartridge uses a 30-degree shoulder angle and the Hornady is 25 degrees, its longer shoulder is accommodated by Ackley’s longer case body. Fireforming will move the Hornady’s shoulder forward at the expense of neck length.

Yet there is a final size issue: according to Ackley’s Manual, his wildcat cartridge is only .289″ over the shoulder while the Hornady factory round measures .294″. This is the reason the Hornady’s case capacity is almost identical to that of the Ackley. Since there is five thousands less taper in the case body, the new .17 Hornady Hornet cases may not fit an Ackley chamber without full-length resizing.

Existing rifles chambered for the Ackley wildcat can have their barrels set back one turn and rechambered to the new .17 Hornady Hornet which meets the SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) standard for the .17 Hornet. This would fix the bullet jump issue and improve ammunition availability with little risk of diminished performance.

.17 Mach IV

The .17 Mach IV is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge, based on the .221 Remington Fireball case, necked down to fire a .172 bullet. The cartridge was introduced in 1962 by Vern O’Brien.[2] The cartridge offered an easy case conversion and good ballistics, but could not compete against the .17 Remington.[3]

The name, Mach IV, comes from the claim that the bullets can reach 4,000 ft/s.[4] Due to the relatively small case capacity, even small variations in powder of 0.5 gr (0.032 g) can lead to the difference between a safe and dangerously over pressure load.

The .17 Mach IV became very popular with varmint hunters, so much so that in 2007, Remington introduced its own very similar version, the .17 Remington Fireball.

.17 PMC/Aguila

The .17 PMC/Aguila or .17 High Standard is a rimfire cartridge formed by necking down the .22 Long Rifle casing to accept a .172″ diameter bullet. This cartridge was developed in 2003 by firearms maker High Standard and ammunition maker Aguila and introduced in 2004. The introduction was ill-timed, however, coming in the middle of the introduction of two major new .17 Rimfires from Hornady, which took over the .17 caliber rimfire market.

The .17 Aguila can be shot in a rifle that is chambered for .17 HM2.[2]

.17 PPC

.17-06

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.17-222

.17-223

The .17-223 is a centerfire wildcat rifle cartridge. It is based on the .223 Remington, but the neck is re-sized to accept a .17 caliber bullet.
.17-225 Winchester

 

.17/23 SMC

.17-357 RG (.172″ Wildcat based on the 357 SIG)

.191 (4.85mm SAA)

.19 Badger

Calhoon cartridges are a class of .19 caliber cartridges created by James Calhoon, a firearms designer with an interest in that bore size. Calhoon began working with .19 caliber after his interest was piqued from learning about British sub-caliber rifle trials in the early 1970s. .19 caliber rifles have thicker rifling than .17 and .20 caliber rifles, which helps the barrel stay clean longer and improves barrel life.[2]

.19 Calhoon Hornet

Calhoon cartridges are a class of .19 caliber cartridges created by James Calhoon, a firearms designer with an interest in that bore size. Calhoon began working with .19 caliber after his interest was piqued from learning about British sub-caliber rifle trials in the early 1970s. .19 caliber rifles have thicker rifling than .17 and .20 caliber rifles, which helps the barrel stay clean longer and improves barrel life.[2]

.19-223

Calhoon cartridges are a class of .19 caliber cartridges created by James Calhoon, a firearms designer with an interest in that bore size. Calhoon began working with .19 caliber after his interest was piqued from learning about British sub-caliber rifle trials in the early 1970s. .19 caliber rifles have thicker rifling than .17 and .20 caliber rifles, which helps the barrel stay clean longer and improves barrel life.[2]

20 BR

The .20 BR is a centerfire wildcat rifle cartridge. It is based on the .22 BR Remington case necked down to accept a 5.2 millimetres (0.204 in) diameter bullet[1] and maintaining the shoulder angle of 30° and case length of 39 millimetres (1.535 in).[2] The cartridge features a short fat case which is reputed to be both efficient and accurate.[3]

The large powder capacity of the case allows it to propel a 2.6 grams (40 gr) bullet at over 1,200 metres per second (4,000 ft/s), however the cartridge is considered overbore and can be expected to have a relatively short barrel life.[1]

The inherent accuracy of the BR case design and the high performance of the .20 BR has led to it being adopted by varmint hunters and target shooters.[citation needed]

Advantages of this cartridge include; its ability to be chambered in any rifle action which has the .308 Winchester sized bolt face; its short length enables action makers to utilise shorter ports to increase rigidity; and cases are easily formed and loaded.[citation needed]

20 Fergusson Ace

The .20 Ferguson Ace is one of a family of wildcat centerfire rifle cartridges based upon the 6mm BR. The .20 Ferguson Ace was probably designed and developed around 2002-2003 by gunsmith and varmint hunter Gaylon ‘Ace’ Ferguson.[1]

Each cartridge in the Ferguson Ace family shares the same body shape and is necked up and down for calibers from .20 to 6.5mm. The case body is longer and wider than the 6mm BR, has a shorter neck and a shoulder angle of 45 degrees which give it approximately 10% more powder capacity than its parent.[2] This allows higher bullet velocities than an unimproved 6mm BR case. An example round recorded 4220fps with a 40 grain V-Max when fired from a 24″ pac-nor 1-11″ twist barrel.[citation needed] This performance comes at the cost of the barrel with life expectancy in around 500-600 shots.

.20 Ferguson Ace cases are usually formed from .22 BR Remington stock, then necked down to .204″ and fire formed in the custom chamber of the rifle. Major drawbacks are the scarcity of both reloading dies and chamber reamers in this format. CH4D offer dies for the .22 Ferguson Ace

20 Magna

20 PPC

.20 Tactical

The .20 Tactical is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge, based on the .223 Remington case, necked down to fire a 5.2 millimetres (0.204 in) caliber bullet. The .20 Tactical was designed by Todd Kindler and predates the .204 Ruger factory round. The case has approximately 0.2 grams (3 gr) less powder capacity than the popular .204 Ruger. Handloaders can get velocities with 2.1 and 2.6 grams (32 and 40 gr) projectiles that almost match the .204 Ruger. Furthermore, the .20 Tactical is also able to achieve these velocities with less powder than the .204 Ruger by more efficiently using high energy propellants such as Alliant Reloader 7 and Winchester 748. Based on the .223 Remington, a wide selection of brass is available. Lapua produces high quality cases in .20 Tactical sold under the Dakota Arms brand.

.20 VarTarg

The .20 VarTarg is a wildcat centerfire rifle cartridge, based on the .221 Remington Fireball case, necked down to fire a 5.2 millimetres (0.204 in) bullet.

The name VarTarg is a portmanteau of varmint and target.

There is also a .20 VarTarg Turbo based on the .222 Remington

.20-06

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.218 Mashburn Bee

.219 Donaldson Wasp

The .219 Donaldson Wasp cartridge was developed during the late 1930s by Harvey Donaldson, and is derived from the .219 Zipper case. Once popular amongst match shooters in the 1940s it has since fallen by the wayside in favor of newer developments. It is however held in high regard for its accuracy and is widely considered the grandfather of benchrest cartridges. Today the round occupies a niche in the falling-block rifle market.

There are in fact three notable versions associated with the Wasp name. The first, designed in the mid 1930s and today known as the 219 Gipson Wasp, was named after the gunsmith who chambered the first Wasp rifle for Donaldson. This version has a case length measuring 1.625″ and was formed from rimless 25 Remington brass.

Donaldson shifted his experimentation to the 219 Zipper brass soon after the introduction of that cartridge by Winchester in 1937. By approximately 1940 Donaldson had lengthened the body of the Wasp case to increase capacity from around 24 to 28 grains of IMR 3031 powder – to see if velocity could be increased while maintaining accuracy. To Donaldson’s delight, the larger case produced both higher velocity and superior accuracy. This development work is detailed in a series of letters written by Donaldson and collectively published in Yours Truly by Wolfe Publishing Company (1980).

Donaldson later lengthened the neck by about 1/32″ so as not to encroach on powder capacity when using a graphite wad behind the bullet. This resulted in a case length of 1.750″. This final design is preserved in a drawing on page 224 of Twenty-Two Caliber Varmint Rifles by Charles S. Landis (1946).

During the 1960s an even longer version appeared as a result of measurements referenced from the front of the rim instead of the rear. This design has a case length of 1.813″ (1.750″ plus 0.063″ rim thickness). The same error has occurred on a number of other popular wildcats.

.22 BR Remington

The .22 Bench Rest Remington cartridge, commonly referred to as the .22 BR Remington, is a wildcat cartridge commonly used in varmint hunting and benchrest shooting. It is based on the .308×1.5-inch Barnes cartridge, necked down to .22 caliber, lengthened by .020 inches and with the shoulder angle increased to 30°. It was first developed in approximately 1963 by Jim Stekl, and in 1978 Remington standardized the dimensions. It is renowned for its high velocities and excellent accuracy.[2]

.22 Cheetah

The .22 CHeetah (both C and H are upper-case,[1] referring to Carmichel / Huntington[2]) is a .22 wildcat cartridge developed in the 1970s or 1980s by Jim Carmichel and Fred Huntington.[3]

The .22 CHeetah is essentially a Remington 308 BR, modified to fit the 22 caliber,[4] and is the most popular wildcat; two custom gunmakers, Shilen Rifle Company and Wichita Engineering, are now making rifles specifically for the cartridge.[5] The cartridge’s 50-grain .22-caliber bullets have a muzzle speed upward of 4,300 ft/s (4,250 according to some[6]), and the cartridge is known for its long-range accuracy and velocity.[2] Its high intensity is notoriously hard on barrels, which require constant cleaning.[6][7]

.22 Eargesplitten Loudenboomer

.22 Eargesplitten Loudenboomer is a cartridge for a rifle.

It was invented in the 1960s by P.O. Ackley to set a world record for firing bullets at over 5000 fps (1524 m/s). The round failed to reach the desired velocity, but reached 4600 fps with a 50 grain bullet and 105 grains of H570 powder. It is based on the .378 Weatherby Magnum cartridge case, necked down to .224 calibre.

.22 K Hornet

.22 Newton

.22 PPC

The 22 PPC was developed in 1974 by Dr. Louis Palmisano and Ferris Pindell, primarily as a benchrest cartridge. Although originally a wildcat, Sako of Finland introduced commercial rifles and ammunition late in 1987. Norma followed suit in 1993 with loaded ammunition. The cartridge is based on the 220 Russian case which is a necked-down version of the 7.62x39mm Soviet military cartridge. The Wichita Engineering and Supply Co. made the first rifles for both the 22 and 6mm PPC cartridges. Many custom rifles have been turned out in this caliber. In 1993 Ruger announced their No. 1 V and M77 varmint rifles in this caliber.General Comments

The originators altered the 220 Russian case by giving it a 10-degree body taper and 30-degree shoulder angle, as well as expanding the neck to accept the standard .224- inch diameter bullet used in the U.S. The cartridge cases are made in Finland by Sako or in Sweden by Norma and use Small Rifle primers. Although the 22 PPC is a short rather stubby case only 1.51 inches long, it nevertheless develops ballistics superior to some larger, longer cartridges such as the 222 and 223 Remington. The 52-grain bullet can be pushed out of the muzzle at over 3500 fps, and this definitely places the 22 PPC in the varmint and small game class. A 1 in 14-inch twist has become pretty much standard for these rifles although 1 in 12-inch twist will sometimes be found.

.22 Savage High Power

The 5.6×52mmR cartridge was created by Charles Newton and produced by Savage Arms in 1912. It is also known as the .22 Savage High-Power and .22 “Imp”, and is based upon the .25-35 Winchester cartridge necked down to accept a .227in/.228in diameter bullet. Its original loading was a 70 grain soft point bullet with a velocity of around 2700–2800 feet per second depending on the rifle.
.22 Spitfire

The .22 Spitfire (also known as 5.7mm Johnson or MMJ 5.7mm Johnson[1]) is an American rifle cartridge.

Designed by Melvin M. Johnson of Johnson Guns Inc. for their conversion of the M1 carbine,[2] this wildcat[3] was introduced in 1963. It was based on the .30 carbine, necked-down to .22 (5.7mm).[4]

It is suitable for rabbits, coyotes, or other varmints,[4] and has potential as a military round.[4]

.22 Super Jet

.22 Waldog

 

.22 WCF

.22 Winchester Centerfire (.22 WCF) is a small centerfire cartridge introduced in 1885 for use in the Winchester Model 1885 single-shot rifle. Factory manufacture of ammunition was discontinued in 1936. The .22 WCF was loaded with a 45 grain bullet with a muzzle velocity of about 1550 feet per second, similar to the performance of the .22 Winchester Rimfire (.22 WRF) designed in 1890.[2] [3] [4] [5]

Experimentation with the .22 WCF among civilian wildcatters and the U.S. military at Springfield Armory in the 1920s led to the development of the .22 Hornet cartridge.[6]
.22-06

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.22-15-60 Stevens

.22-243 Middlestead

.22-284 Winchester

.22/30 (T65 Duplex)

.22/30-30 Improved

 

.22/303

The .303/22, sometimes known as the .22/303 is a wildcat centrefire rifle cartridge, based on the .303 British, necked down to fire a .224 projectile, originating in Australia in the 1930s as a cartridge for sporterised rifles, particularly on the Lee–Enfield action, similar versions also appeared in Canada around the same time.[3]

The .303/22 was very popular for a number of reasons, one being that the .22 caliber was better suited to small game than the .303, the rifles were cheap and plentiful and in New South Wales ownership of military cartridges was severely restricted. Several versions existed, including the full length Falcon, the shortened Sprinter, the even shorter Wasp, the Varmint-R and many others.[4] Although Lee–Enfields were the most common, conversion of other rifles mostly suited to rimmed cartridges such as P14 Enfield, Martini–Enfield, 1885 and 1895 Winchesters were often seen, as well as 98 and 96 Mausers.[5]

Loaded ammunition and brass was produced by the Super Cartridge Company, Riverbrand, ICI and Sportco, some using new Boxer primed cases, others using military Berdan primed cases. Cases can be formed simply by necking down .303 British brass available from Remington, Federal, Winchester, Sellier & Bellot and others. Reloading dies are made by most larger manufacturers, like RCBS, CH[6] and Simplex.[7]

.220 Weatherby Rocket

.222 Rimmed

The .222 Rimmed is a centrefire rifle cartridge, originating in Australia in the 1960s as a cartridge for single shot rifles, particularly the Martini Cadet action.[3] Performance is similar to the .222 Remington on which it is based however loads should be reduced as the walls of the brass cases are generally thicker.[4] Extraction of cases that have been loaded to higher pressures can be difficult due to the inefficient extraction method utilised by the Martini Cadet.

Cases and loaded rounds were originally produced by the Super Cartridge Company.[5] Brass is now available from the Bertram Bullet Company[6] or can be made from 5.6x50mmR RWS cases.[4]

The .222 Rimmed has also been used as a parent case for wildcats, similar to ones based on the .222 Remington, such as rimmed versions of the .17 Mach IV, the .17-222, and the .20 VarTarg.[7]

.223 AI

The .223 Remington (.223 Rem) is a rifle cartridge. The name is commonly pronounced either two-twenty-three or two-two-three Remington. It is commercially loaded with 0.224 inch (5.56 mm) diameter jacketed bullets, with weights ranging from 40 to 85 grains (2.6 to 5.8 g), though the most common loading by far is 55 grains (3.6 g). A 90 gr Sierra Matchking bullet is available for reloaders. [3] The .223 Rem was first offered to the civilian sporting market in December 1963 in the Remington 760 rifle. [4] In 1964 the .223 Rem cartridge was adopted for use in the Colt M16 rifle which became an alternate standard rifle of the U.S. Army. The military version of the cartridge uses a 55 gr full metal jacket boattail design and was designated M193. In 1980 NATO modified the .223 Remington into a new design which is designated 5.56×45mm NATO type SS109. [5]

.224 Donaldson Ace

.240 Apex (.240 Belted Nitro Express and .240 Magnum Flanged)

The .240 Holland & Holland Magnum (also known as the .240 Apex, .240 Belted Nitro Express, .240 Magnum Rimless, or .240 Super Express) is a centrefire sporting rifle cartridge developed in England in the 1920s, primarily for use in hunting deer and plains game. This round has always been closely associated with the firm of Holland & Holland, rifle and gun makers of London, England, which has built more magazine and double rifles in this calibre than anyone else. A rimmed variant of this cartridge, known as the .240 Magnum Flanged, was developed for use in double rifles.[1]

.25 Ackley Krag

 

.25 Gibbs

 

.25 Krag

 

.25 Remington

The .25 Remington (also known as the .25 Remington Auto-Loading) is an American rifle cartridge. A rimless, smokeless powder design, this cartridge was considered to be very accurate by period firearm experts and suitable for game up to deer and black bear.[1]

The .25 Remington cartridge dates to 1906 and its introduction by Remington in the Model 8 rifle. Other rifles chambered for the .25 Remington include the Remington 14 slide-action, Remington 30 bolt action, Stevens 425 lever-action, and Standard Arms rifles. Due to their similar dimensions, the .25 Remington, .30 Remington, and .32 Remington together were known as the Remington Rimless cartridge series.[2] Firearm manufacturers generally offered all three of these cartridges as chamberings in a rifle model rather than just one of the series. The series was competitive with Winchester Repeating Arms Company’s contemporary lever action offerings: .25-35 Winchester, .30-30, and .32 Winchester Special.

The .25 Remington case was shortened and necked down to .22 caliber to form Lysle Kilbourn’s wildcat .22 Kilbourn Magnum Junior and the rimless version of Leslie Lindahl’s wildcat .22 Chucker.[3]

Harvey Donaldson also used the .25 Remington case in early experiments that would eventually lead to the creation of the .219 Donaldson Wasp. Donaldson later switched his experimentation to Winchester .219 Zipper brass after the launch of that cartridge in 1937.

.25-21 Stevens

The .25-21 Stevens was an American centerfire rifle cartridge.[1]

Designed by Capt. W. L. Carpenter, 9th U.S. Infantry, in 1897,[1] the .25-21 was a bottlenecked round, based on the longer .25-25.[1] It was Stevens’ second straight-cased cartridge (after the .25-25)[2] and would be used in the single shot Model 44 rifle, as well as the Model 44½, which first went on sale in 1903.[2] In addition, it was available in the Remington-Hepburn target rifle.[1]

While the .25-25 was popular, the .25-21 offered “practically the same performance and was a little cleaner shooting.”[2] It was also found the usual 20 or 21 gr (1.30 or 1.36 g) black powder charge of the shorter, bottlenecked .25-21 offered “practically the same ballistics” as 24 or 25 gr (1.56 or 1.62 g) in the .25-25. It was highly accurate, reputedly capable of generating .5 in (12.7 mm) groups at 100 yd (91 m).[1]

In power, the .25-21 was outpaced by the .25-20 WCF[3] and .32-20 Winchester,[4] while today, even modern pistol rounds such as the .38 Super offer superior performance.[5]

.25-25 Stevens

The .25-25 Stevens was an American centerfire rifle cartridge.[1]

Designed by Capt. W. L. Carpenter, 9th U.S. Infantry,[2] in 1895,[1] the .25-25 Stevens was the company’s first straight-cased cartridge.[1] It would be used in Stevens’ single shot Model 44, as well as the Model 44½ rifles, which first went on sale in 1903.[1] In addition, it was available in the Remington-Hepburn target rifle.

While the .25-25 was popular, the .25-21 offered “practically the same performance and was a little cleaner shooting.”[1] It also suffered a “freakish”[1] appearance, due to its length to diameter ratio.[1] It was also found the usual 20 or 21 gr (1.30 or 1.36 g) black powder charge of the shorter, bottlenecked.[3] 25-21 offered “practically the same ballistics” as 24 or 25 gr (1.56 or 1.62 g) in the .25-25.

The switch to smokeless powder only exacerbated the problem, due to the small charge.[1] To cure this, handloaders use a mix of 3 to 5 gr (0.19 to 0.32 g) of bulk shotgun powder and 18 to 20 gr (1.2 to 1.3 g) of black powder, with bullets of between 60 to 86 gr (3.9 to 5.6 g).

.256 Newton

The .256 Newton is a high-velocity rimless cartridge and was developed by Charles Newton in 1913 in conjunction with the Western Cartridge Company. It is a 30-06 Springfield cartridge, shortened[1] and necked down to .264) with a different shoulder angle. However, the .256 Newton and the .30-06 are not interchangeable. The .256 Newton and the 6.5-06 are not interchangeable.

.256 Winchester Magnum

The .256 Winchester Magnum was a firearms cartridge developed by Winchester, and was produced by necking-down a .357 Magnum cartridge to .257 diameter. It was designed for shooting small game and varmints. Introduced in 1960, Winchester offered ammo and reloading components into the early 1990s. The cartridge was first chambered in the Ruger Hawkeye single shot pistol. The next year (1962) Marlin chambered their Model 62 Levermatic rifle for the new Winchester cartridge. These were the two principle firearms chambered for the .256 Win. Mag. It is now obsolete and only offered as a chambering by custom manufacturers of single-shot firearm barrels such as Match Grade Machine and Bullberry. Previously, the T/C Custom Shop had produced some, before closing its doors forever in 2010.

From an 8.5 inch pistol barrel the 60 grain .256 Winchester factory load was advertised as having a MV of 2350 fps and ME of 735 ft. lbs. This was 250 fps faster and nearly twice as powerful as the .22 Remington Jet, a varmint cartridge for revolvers that was also based on a necked-down .357 Magnum case.

According to data from the fifth edition of the Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading handloaders with a .256 rifle can approximately duplicate the Winchester factory load using the Hornady 60 grain Flat Point bullet in front of 15.5 grains of H4227 powder for a MV of 2700 fps. The trajectory of that load looks like this: +2.3 inches at 50 yards, +4.4 inches at 100 yards, 0 at 200 yards, and -26.2 inches at 300 yards.

Winchester offered factory loaded .256 Magnum ammunition (and brass to reloaders) into the beginning of the 1990s. Winchester .256 factory loads used a 60 grain Open Point Expanding bullet at a MV of 2760 fps and ME of 1015 ft. lbs. from a 24-inch rifle barrel. That is about 500 fps faster than Winchester factory loads for the old .25-20 cartridge. At 200 yards the velocity was 1542 fps and the remaining energy was 317 ft. lbs.

.264 LBC-AR

The 6.5mm Grendel (6.5×39mm) is an intermediate cartridge designed by Arne Brennan, Bill Alexander, and Janne Pohjoispää as a low recoil, high accuracy, 200–800 yard cartridge specifically for the AR-15. It is an improved variation of the 6.5mm PPC.[4] Since its introduction, it has proven to be a versatile design and is now expanding out into other firearms including bolt-action rifles and the Kalashnikov system.[5]

The name “6.5mm Grendel” was a trademark owned by Alexander Arms until it was legally released to allow the cartridge to become SAAMI standardized.[6][7]

.264 warrior magnum (6.5×40 mm)

.25/303

The .303/25, sometimes known as the .25/303 is a wildcat centrefire rifle cartridge, based on the .303 British, necked down to fire a .257 projectile, originating in Australia in the 1940s as a cartridge for sporterised rifles, particularly on the Lee–Enfield action; similar versions also appeared in Canada around the same time.[3]

.270 Titus Savage

.275 H&H Magnum

The .275 Holland & Holland Magnum is a semi-obsolete rifle cartridge similar to the 7mm Remington Magnum. Essentially the .275 Holland & Holland Magnum is a necked down shortened variant of the .375 Holland & Holland Magnum. It was introduced by the British company Holland & Holland with the .375 Holland & Holland Magnum that was introduced in 1912 as the .375 Belted Rimless Nitro-Express. The .375 Holland & Holland Magnum was intended for dangerous African game animals, while the .275 Holland & Holland Magnum was intended for longer range shooting of antelope in Africa and Red Stag in the highlands of Scotland.

.280 British

The .280 British was an experimental rimless bottlenecked intermediate rifle cartridge. It was later designated 7 mm MK1Z, and has also been known as 7 mm NATO, .280/30, .280 Enfield, .280 NATO, 7 mm FN Short, and 7×43mm.

Lik  most armed forces in the immediate post-World War II era, the British Army began experimenting with lighter rounds after meeting the German StG 44 in combat. The Army began development in the late 1940s, with subsequent help from Fabrique Nationale in Belgium and the Canadian Army. The .280 British was tested in a variety of rifles and machine guns including the EM-2, Lee–Enfield, FN FAL, Bren, M1 Garand and Taden gun.

Despite its success as an intermediate cartridge, the .280 British was not considered powerful enough by the U.S. Army and several variants of the .280 British were created in an attempt to appease the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army continued to reject these variants, ultimately adopting the 7.62×51mm NATO.

.276 Enfield

The .276 Enfield was an experimental military rifle cartridge developed in conjunction with the Pattern 1913 Enfield (P’13) rifle. Development was discontinued by the onset of World War I.

.276 Pedersen

The .276 Pedersen (7×51mm) round was an experimental 7 mm cartridge developed for the U.S. Army and used in the Pedersen rifle and early versions of what would become the M1 Garand.

.280 Ross

The .280 Ross, also known as the .280 Nitro, .280 Rimless Nitro Express Ross (CIP) and .280 Rimless cartridge, is an approximately 7mm bullet diameter rifle round developed in Canada by F.W. Jones as a consultant to Sir Charles Ross, 9th Baronet, and his Ross Rifle Company of Quebec, Canada for use as a Canadian military cartridge as a replacement for the .303 British, and in a civilianised and sporterised version of his controversial Mark II and Mk III Ross rifle, and first commercially produced by Eley Brothers of London, England, in late 1907.[1]

.30 BR

.30 USA

.30 Walker

This cartridge is an improved version of the PPC cartridge family necked up to accept .308″ bullets. The .30 Walker was designed for 100-300 yard bench rest and f-class shooting using 112-118 grain flat based bullets in slow twist rate barrels.

The .30 Walker case may be made by using Lapua 6.5 mm Grendel brass and increasing the caliber to .308 and turning the neck diameter to .330″.

.30-03

The .30-03 was a short-lived cartridge developed by the United States in 1903, to replace the .30-40 Krag in the new Springfield 1903 rifle. The .30-03 was also called the .30-45, since it used a 45 grain (2.9 g (0.10 oz)) powder charge; the name was changed to .30-03 to indicate the year of adoption.[2] It used a 220 grain (14 g (0.49 oz)) roundnose bullet. It was replaced after only three years of service by the .30-06, firing a spitzer bullet giving better ballistic performance.[3]

.309 jdj

.30-06 JDJ

Compared to a default .30-06 round, the .30-06 JDJ contains has a smaller neck that is at a 60-degree angle. However, the biggest difference is that the .30-06 JDJ has little body taper compared to the original .30-06 cartridge. This allows the .30-06 JDJ to hold an extra 5 grains of water (4.875 cm3) compared to the .30-06 Springfield, allowing one to put more gunpowder into the cartridge.[1]

This round manages to replicate in a pistol the ballistics of a .30-06 round fired from a rifle. For example, a .30-06 JDJ cartridge with a 200-grain bullet fired from a custom Contender has a muzzle velocity of 2,504 ft/s (763 m/s), while a regular .30-06 cartridge with a 200-grain bullet with 55 grains of gunpowder has a velocity of 2,558 ft/s (780 m/s).[2]

.309 Bull

.300 Dakota

.300 ICL Grizzly

ICL cartridges (ICL stands for Increased Case Load) are rare hunting wildcat cartridges developed by Arnold & Vern Juenke,[2] gunsmiths who owned Saturn Gun Works in Reno, Nevada. ICL cartridges are wildcats based on conventional cases in use at the time. They feature a 45 degree shoulder[3] and the sides are straightened out compared to the parent cartridge. Most of the cartridges are considered improved cartridges since they simply create more powder space while maintaining the same caliber as the parent cartridge. Most of the line of cartridges carries an animal name in addition to a numeric designation. It is one of the most complete lines of wildcats, having a large number of cartridges with a variety of calibers.[4]

Quality Cartridge is the only manufacturer making new brass cases correctly headstamped for many ICL cartridges.[5]

.300 Lapua Magnum

The .300 Lapua Magnum (7.62×70mm) is a specialized rimless bottlenecked centerfire cartridge developed for long-range rifles. The commercially successful .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge has functioned as the parent case for the .300 Lapua Magnum, which is essentially a necked-down version of the .338 Lapua Magnum. The .338 cartridge case was used for this since it has the capability to operate with high chamber pressures which, combined with smaller and hence lighter bullets result in very high muzzle velocities.

.300 Remington American Magnum

.300 Whisper (.300 Fireball)

The .300 Whisper is a CIP standard[1] cartridge in the Whisper family, a group of cartridges developed in the early 1990s by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries. It was developed as a multi-purpose cartridge, capable of utilizing relatively lightweight bullets at supersonic velocities as well as heavier bullets (200–250 grains) at subsonic velocities.

.300 Whisper is also sometimes known as .300 Fireball or .300-221, but the .300 Whisper is a CIP cartridge and other names are generally known as wildcat cartridges. When compared to .300 AAC Blackout this sentence from Steve Johnson’s article in American Hunter sums it up best, “Given the fact that major manufacturers such as Hornady are building ammunition headstamped .300 Whisper and recommending it for use in either platform—in addition to producing reloading dies that are marked “300 Whisper/Blackout” and Smith & Wesson stamps the barrel of its M&P-15 Whisper barrels with: “300 Whisper/300 AAC Blackout” it is safe to say that differences are minimal. “.[2] CIP has specifications for both .300 Whisper and .300 Blackout cartridges that are very similar, though all manufactures will recommend using the correct ammunition with the correct firearm.

.300-221

The .300 Whisper is a CIP standard[1] cartridge in the Whisper family, a group of cartridges developed in the early 1990s by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries. It was developed as a multi-purpose cartridge, capable of utilizing relatively lightweight bullets at supersonic velocities as well as heavier bullets (200–250 grains) at subsonic velocities.

.300 Whisper is also sometimes known as .300 Fireball or .300-221, but the .300 Whisper is a CIP cartridge and other names are generally known as wildcat cartridges. When compared to .300 AAC Blackout this sentence from Steve Johnson’s article in American Hunter sums it up best, “Given the fact that major manufacturers such as Hornady are building ammunition headstamped .300 Whisper and recommending it for use in either platform—in addition to producing reloading dies that are marked “300 Whisper/Blackout” and Smith & Wesson stamps the barrel of its M&P-15 Whisper barrels with: “300 Whisper/300 AAC Blackout” it is safe to say that differences are minimal. “.[2] CIP has specifications for both .300 Whisper and .300 Blackout cartridges that are very similar, though all manufactures will recommend using the correct ammunition with the correct firearm.

.303-06

Wildcat cartridges are firearms cartridges whose dimensions have been modified. Usually these modifications are with an eye toward improved performance, either measurable or not. This article deals with wildcat cartridges which result from a simple necking down or up of the original .30-06 Springfield where the overall case length is kept essentially the same. Many of these wildcats were more stages in the development of modern wildcat cartridges than they were a serious chambering in their own right.

.330 Dakota

.333 Jeffery Flanged

The .333 Jeffery and .333 Jeffery Flanged are medium bore centrefire rifle cartridges developed by W.J. Jeffery & Co and introduced in 1908.

.333 OKH

.338-06 A-Square

The .338-06 is a wildcat cartridge based on the .30-06. It allows heavier .338 caliber bullets to be used from the .30-06 non-belted case. This is a better choice for heavy bodied game such as moose, elk, and brown bear than the .30-06. 338 caliber bullets became more widely available after the introduction in the late 1950s of the .338 Winchester Magnum cartridge, frequently chambered in the Winchester Model 70 rifle. The .338-06 maintains much of the benefits of the .338 Magnum cartridge but has substantially less recoil, makes more efficient use of powder, and allows use of widely available .30-06 commercial and military cases. It is similar in concept to the .333 OKH as well as the .35 Whelen, which also use the .30-06 brass case as a basis for the cartridge. Thanks to the large number of rifles based on the .30-06 family of cartridges, having a .338-06 made usually only requires a simple barrel change by a competent gun smith. A-Square adopted the caliber as the .338-06 A-Square in approximately 1998, and was approved by SAAMI as a standardized caliber. Weatherby offered factory rifles and ammunition, but has now dropped the rifles from its inventory. The 338-06 A-Square tends to have a velocity advantage over the .35 Whelen and uses bullets that retain velocity and resist wind drift better than similar weight bullets fired from the .35 Whelen.

.338 Hawk/Scoville

 

.338 Whisper

The .338 Whisper is a wildcat cartridge in the Whisper family, a group of cartridges developed in the early 1990s by J.D. Jones of SSK Industries.[1] Unlike the smaller caliber cartridges in the Whisper family, loads for the .338 Whisper are mainly limited to subsonic velocities.[2]

.338 Voschol

.338 x 57 O’Connor

.35 Samba (Also .35 WSM)

.357/.44 B & D (Bain and Davis)

 

.375 Dakota

The .375 Dakota is dangerous game cartridge designed by Don Allen, the founder of Dakota Arms of Sturgis, South Dakota.

Like the .375 Ruger and the .376 Steyr, the .375 Dakota was designed to compete with the .375 H&H Magnum, yet have the advantage of having a rimless, beltless case and can function through a standard-length rifle action due to a shorter overall length. Like the .375 Remington Ultra Magnum, this cartridge is based on the Canadian Magnum series of rifle cartridges developed by Aubrey White and Noburo Uno, which were based on the .404 Jeffery cartridge. However, unlike the .375 RUM and the .375 Canadian Magnum cartridges which have rebated rims, the Dakota is of a rimless design. Since the .375 Dakota is a proprietary cartridge neither SAAMI or the CIP have provided guidelines or specifications concerning the cartridge.

The .375 Dakota is available in the Dakota Model 76 and Model 97 bolt-action riles and the Model 10 and Miller single-shot rifles. Both the Model 76 and Model 97 rifles are based on the Winchester pre-’64 Mauser design while the Model 10 and Miller are falling-block rifles.

.375 Whisper

Modern .375 H&H (based on full length 375 Ruger)

.40-65 Winchester

The .40-65 Winchester (also called the .40-65 Winchester and Marlin)[1] was an American rifle cartridge.

Introduced in 1887 for the Winchester Model 1886, and available in Winchester single shots and in the Marlin Model 1895, it was “a further effort to put more steam” in repeating rifle cartridges.[2] In the modern era, the cartridge has gained favor for metallic silhouette shooting and Black Powder Cartridge Rifle matches where is serves as a low-recoil alternative to the common 45-70.[3][4]

It was commercially available in black and smokeless varieties until around 1935, and can be handloaded by reforming .45-70 brass.[2]

.40-70 Sharps

.400 Whelen

The .400 Whelen cartridge was developed by Colonel Townsend Whelen while he was commanding officer of Frankford Arsenal in the early 1920s.[2] The cartridge resembles a .30-06 Springfield case necked up to .40 caliber to accept bullets manufactured for the .405 Winchester.

.416 Taylor

The .416 Taylor is a rifle cartridge. According to Ken Waters in Pet Loads, it was created by Robert Chatfield-Taylor in the early 1970s, with the first rifle in this caliber being a factory barreled Winchester Model 70.[1] The case is based on the .458 Winchester Magnum necked down to accept .416 caliber bullets.

.416 Whisper

Modern 416 (based on full length 375 Ruger)

 

.425 Westley Richards

It is a cartridge invented by Leslie Taylor of Westley Richards, a gunmaking firm of Birmingham England in 1909 as a proprietary cartridge for their bolt action rifles. Often referred to as the “Poor Man’s Magnum” the round has the unusual characteristic of having a rebated rim, one that is smaller in diameter than the case body. This allowed it to be used in converted Mauser 98 magazine rifles with a standard (.30-06 size) magazine length and bolt face. The rebated rim also allowed Government Game Officers to use stripper clips for rapid reloads when culling rogue animals.

The .425 later served as the parent case for the .458 SOCOM.

.44 Henry

The .44 Henry, also known as the .44 Rimfire, the .44 Long Rimfire, or the 11x23mmR (11x23mm Rimmed) in Europe, is a rimfire rifle and handgun cartridge featuring a .875 in (22.2 mm)-long brass or copper case. The round has a total overall length of 1.345 in (34.2 mm), with a 200 or 216 gr (12.96 or 14.00 g; 0.46 or 0.49 oz) .446 in (11.3 mm)-diameter cast solid-lead heeled bullet. The original propellant load is 26 to 28 gr (1.68 to 1.81 g; 0.06 to 0.06 oz) of black powder. The round has a muzzle velocity of approximately 1,125 ft/s (343 m/s), giving a muzzle energy of 568 foot-pounds (770 joules ).

Template:.44 –WSP

.45-90 Sharps

The .45-90 Sharps cartridge is a black powder round introduced in 1877 by the Sharps Rifle Manufacturing Company. Also known as the .45 2 4/10, the cartridge was developed for hunting and long range target shooting. In the modern day, it is used for Black Powder Cartridge Rifle competitions.[1]

While various bullet weights were used, a typical load for the .45-90 was a powder charge 90 grains (5.8 g) gunpowder (black powder) with a bullet weighing 400 grains (26 g). Such a load would have about 1,300 ft/s (400 m/s) muzzle velocity.

.45-110 Sharps

.45-120 Sharps

.450 Watts Magnum

The .450 Watts Magnum was designed by Watts and Anderson of Washington State. The .450 Watts Magnum is similar to the .458 Lott with the exception of case length which is 2.850-inch (72.4 mm).[1] While the case capacity is slightly more than that of the Lott cartridge, the maximum overall cartridge length is the same. As this is the case, once the bullet is seated case powder capacity is almost identical. A .450 Watts Magnum chamber will accept the .458 Lott cartridge without issue. The .458 Winchester Magnum can be fired in the chamber if required. The .450 Watts can be fired in the chambers of the .450 Ackley Magnum, .450 Barnes Supreme and the .450 Mashburn Magnum chambers.[36] Firing the case in an improved chambers similar to that of the Ackley or the Barnes cartridges will result in a slight reduction in performance.

Modern 450 (2.598″ 404 Case)

Modern 460 (2.850″ 404 Case)

.458 SOCOM

The .458 SOCOM (11.63×40mm) is a moderately large round designed for a specialized upper receiver that can be mounted on any AR-15 pattern lower receiver. The 300-grain (19 g) round offers a supersonic muzzle velocity of 1,900 ft/s (580 m/s) and 2,405 ft·lbf (3,261 J),[1] similar to .45-70 but with a much smaller case suited to an automatic type action.

.470 Capstick

The .470 Capstick is a rifle cartridge created by Col. Arthur B Alphin from A-Square in 1990, named after writer and hunter Peter Hathaway Capstick.[1] It is based on a .375 H&H Magnum case blown out and necked to accept a .475 inch (12 mm) bullet. With 500 grain (32 g) bullets, it can achieve 2400 feet per second (730 m/s) muzzle velocity from a 26″ barrel.

.475 OKH

 

.475 Ackley

.50 Razor Back

.500 Phantom

.550 Magnum

.600/577 REWA

.700 AHR

.700 WTF

Metric
4.5mm mkr

The 4.5mm MKR cartridge was a prototype Swedish rifle cartridge.
5mm Craig

When Remington discontinued production of 5mm RRM ammunition, owners of Remington 591 and 592 rifles were left with excellent rifles but no ammunition for them. Mike Craig in 1994 in Seattle began work on a centerfire conversion of the 5mm RRM, the 5mm Craig.[12][13] His company, Certech, also performed conversions of 5mm rifles from rimfire to centerfire by altering the bolt and installing a new firing pin, restoring them to use. Craig has since sold all the rights to the 5mm Craig to Eagle View Arms of Shelton, WA.[13]

5mm/35 SMc

SMc cartridges were developed in an attempt to produce an efficient cartridge combining low recoil, low heat, and high velocity.[3] The 5 mm/35 SMc has produced velocities in excess of 4,800 ft/s (1,500 m/s) shooting a 30-grain (1.9 g) molybdenum disulfide-coated Berger bullet from a 28 inches (71 cm) Pac-Nor barrel, far higher than its commercial counterpart the .204 Ruger.

Although it is a wildcat cartridge, rifles chambered for 5mm/35 are available from the custom shop at Savage Arms.[4]

The patents for the cartridge are US 7210260, US 7086336 and US 2003079639.

6-06

 

6-284

6mmAR

The cartridge uses a 6.5 Grendel case that has been necked-down to accept a 6 mm (.243 in.) bullet.

The 6mm AR takes advantage of the wide variety of .243 in. caliber bullets. Slim, long bullets with high ballistic coefficient are ideal for energy retention at long ranges.[2]

It is similar to the 6PDK which also uses a 6mm bullet and a similar muzzle energy and case capacity to the 6mm AR and 6.5 Grendel, in a casing somewhat popular[3] for the AR-15, a necked-down 6.8mm Remington SPC casing.

6mm BRX

6mm Dasher

6mm XC

6mm XC (also known as 6XC) is a rifle cartridge, similar to the 6x47mm Swiss Match, that was developed specifically for NRA High Power match shooting by 11-time NRA High Power National Champion David Tubb. It is touted as being one of the most accurate long-range 6 mm rounds in the world that is designed for repeating rifles.

Originally, the case for this wildcat cartridge had to be formed from .22-250 brass, but it is now commercially available.

6×45 mm

The 6×45mm is a rimless, bottlenecked cartridge based on the .223 Remington or 5.56 NATO cartridge necked up to .243 (6mm). The cartridge is also known as the 6mm-223 Remington or 6mm/223.

6 x 47 Swiss Match (6mm/222 Mag)

6.5-06

The 6.5-06 A-Square is a centerfire rifle cartridge that originated as a wildcat, based on the popular .30-06 Springfield. A-Square standardized the dimensions of the cartridge and submitted them to SAAMI in 1997.
6.5 Grendel (6.5x39mm)

The 6.5mm Grendel (6.5×39mm) is an intermediate cartridge designed by Arne Brennan, Bill Alexander, and Janne Pohjoispää as a low recoil, high accuracy, 200–800 yard cartridge specifically for the AR-15. It is an improved variation of the 6.5mm PPC.[4] Since its introduction, it has proven to be a versatile design and is now expanding out into other firearms including bolt-action rifles and the Kalashnikov system.[5]

The name “6.5mm Grendel” was a trademark owned by Alexander Arms until it was legally released to allow the cartridge to become SAAMI standardized.[6][7]

6.5 CSS

6.5 PPCX

6.5 BPC

6.5 BR

 

6.5x40mm (.264 warrior magnum)

6.5 x 47 Lapua

6.5×47mm Lapua (or 6.5×47mm) is a rifle cartridge that was developed specifically for 300–1000 meter competition by ammunition maker Nammo Lapua and the Swiss rifle manufacturer Grünig & Elmiger AG in 2005.[1]

6.5 x 57

6.5 Jonson

6.5 Wby Mag

6.5/.243 WSSM

7mm Dakota

7mm Gradle Express

7x54mm Fournier

Created by the gunsmith Jean Fournier, the 7x54mm Fournier is basically the 7.5x54mm French necked down to 7 mm. The cartridge was designed to be used with the Mas Fournier hunting rifle, which was itself a modification of the MAS-36 rifle.

Since the retirement and death of Jean Fournier, the fabrication of this cartridge has stopped. However, if some original ammos are still available for sale (mainly as collector), reloading dies and tables have been released since then.

7.62 Jonson

 

7.62 Thumper

7.62mm Thumper is a barrel specification optimized to run larger bullets out of standard 7.62×39mm cases.[1] Barrels are cut to a standard 7.62×39mm “Russian” chamber but the bore ideally uses a faster 1:8″ rifling twist rate in order to stabilize bullets heavier than 200gr at subsonic speeds.[2] (Standard 1/10″ twist barrels seem to be adequate for bullets up to 220gr.) Bores are also cut to .308″ instead of the wider .311″ diameter standard for 7.62×39mm,[3] which allows reloaders to accurately employ the much more common and diverse .308 bullets, which are widely available in weights up to 240gr.

The problem with .311 bores is that they do not shoot .308 bullets accurately. .311 bullets are typically only found in weights up to 180gr,[4] which is more difficult to run at subsonic speeds in the 7.62×39mm case.

The largest advantage of the 7.62mm Thumper is that the underlying case is common and, unlike most subsonic rifle cartridges, does not require modifications for subsonic loadings. Also, when loaded with heavier bullets it employs enough propellant to reliably cycle gas-operated semiautomatic firearms designed for the 7.62×39mm.

7.82 Lazzeroni Patriot

7.82 Lazzeroni Warbird

8mm-06 Ackley Improved

10,4 x 38 Vetterli (US: “.41 Swiss”)

10,4 x 47 Italian Vetterli

Bore/Gauge
12 bore

The gauge of a firearm is a unit of measurement used to express the inner diameter (bore diameter) of the barrel. Gauge is determined from the weight of a solid sphere of lead that will fit the bore of the firearm, and is expressed as the multiplicative inverse of the sphere’s weight as a fraction of a pound, e.g., a one-twelfth pound ball fits a 12-gauge bore. Thus there are twelve 12-gauge balls per pound, etc. The term is related to the measurement of cannon, which were also measured by the weight of their iron round shot; an 8 pounder would fire an 8 lb (3.6 kg) ball.

Gauge is commonly used today in reference to shotguns, though historically it was also used in large double rifles, which were made in sizes up to 2 bore during their heyday in the 1880s, being originally loaded with black powder cartridges. These very large rifles, sometimes called elephant guns, were intended for use in India and Africa for hunting dangerous game.

Gauge is abbreviated “ga.”, “ga”, or “G”. The space between the number and the abbreviation is often left out, as in “12ga”.

10 bore

The gauge of a firearm is a unit of measurement used to express the inner diameter (bore diameter) of the barrel. Gauge is determined from the weight of a solid sphere of lead that will fit the bore of the firearm, and is expressed as the multiplicative inverse of the sphere’s weight as a fraction of a pound, e.g., a one-twelfth pound ball fits a 12-gauge bore. Thus there are twelve 12-gauge balls per pound, etc. The term is related to the measurement of cannon, which were also measured by the weight of their iron round shot; an 8 pounder would fire an 8 lb (3.6 kg) ball.

Gauge is commonly used today in reference to shotguns, though historically it was also used in large double rifles, which were made in sizes up to 2 bore during their heyday in the 1880s, being originally loaded with black powder cartridges. These very large rifles, sometimes called elephant guns, were intended for use in India and Africa for hunting dangerous game.

Gauge is abbreviated “ga.”, “ga”, or “G”. The space between the number and the abbreviation is often left out, as in “12ga”.

 

 

 

8 bore

The 8 bore, also known as the 8 gauge, is an obsolete caliber used commonly in the 19th-century black-powder firearms.

Six bore

The 6 bore, also known as the 6 gauge, is an obsolete caliber that was used commonly in 19th-century black-powder firearms.

4 bore – approx. 25mm

Four bore or 4 bore is an almost obsolete black powder caliber of the 19th century, used for the hunting of large and potentially dangerous game animals. The specifications place this caliber between the larger two bore and the lesser six bore. This caliber was the quintessential elephant gun caliber of the black powder safari rifles.[1]

2 bore – 33.6mm

Two bore or 2 bore is a mostly obsolete firearm caliber.